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Full text of "Current Sauce (Volume 1988-1989)"


JUNE 7, 1988 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 
OF LOUISIANA 



VOL. 77, NO. 1 



tteel Magnolias attracts big stars, dollars to Natchitoches area 



, SONY A RIGAUD 
Hot 

The Rastar Production of Steel 
ignolias will bring Sally Field, 
jUy Parton, Shirley MacLaine, 
ympia Dukakis, Daryl Hannah and 
% Roberts to Natchitoches this 
juner along with an estimated $2.5 
llion. 

Filming of the movie will run 
|y 12 through Sept. 15, with two 
«ks of rehearsals beginning June 

Herbert Ross will direct the 
ivie, which is being produced by 
y Stark for Tri-Star Pictures re- 
se. Stark, a long-time giant in the 
ition picture industry, has produced 
merous pictures, including Funny 
& Ross has directed a number of 
ijor films, including Funny Lady, 
}tocol,Footloose, The Secret of My 
tcess, Pennies From Heaven and 
t Turning Point, for which he re- 
ved an Oscar nomination. 

Victoria White is executive 
xlucer, James Glennon is director 
photography and Andrew Stone is 
associate producer. 

Unit production manager Dean 
Brien said the picture has "a block- 
iter cast, and casting is not com- 
te. This picture has already attracted 
ae of the industry's biggest stars, 
I others are interested in the proj- 

O'Brien said Steel Magnolias is 
lajor film because of the impres- 
s credits of the cast as well as those 



of the producer, director and others 
involved with the film. 

Three of the stars who signed 
with the picture have won Academy 
Awards. Field won two Oscars for 
bestactress ioxNormaRae and Places 
in the Heart, MacLaine won best ac- 
tress for Terms of Endearment, and 
Dukakis received an Oscar this year 
for best supporting actress in Moon- 
struck. 

Country.music superstar Parton 
appeared in 9 to 5 and Best Little 
Whorehouse in Texas. Hannah has 
starred in numerous films including 
Splash, Legal Eagles, Roxanne and 
Reckless. Roberts has appeared in such 
movies asBaja Oklahoma, Blood Red 
and Satisfaction. 

Louisiana Gov. Buddy Roemer 
said, "Filming of this major motion 
picture in Natchitoches will not only 
have a positive impact on the econ- 
omy of the community and the state, it 
will also focus favorable nationwide 
and even international attention on 
Louisiana." 

Roemer continued: "This pic- 
ture is especially significant for Lou- 
isiana because it was written by a 
young man from Natchitoches, and it 
is about Louisiana people. The film- 
ing will focus attention on the unique 
resources of Louisiana for such artis- 
tic and entertainment projects, and the 
picture itself will reflect the character, 
talents and strengths of the people of 
our state." 

More than 100 cast and crew 



members will be in Natchitoches when 
filming starts in mid-July. The Steel 
Magnolias production staff is housed 
in Northwestern ' s Physical Education 
Majors Building. 

The building's gymnasium will 
serve as a soundstage. Several layers 
of plywood are being used to protect 
the hardwood floor. Eventually the 
gymnasium will be divided into sev- 
eral sets for interior filming. 

Several homes in Natchitoches 
have been selected as film sites and 
living quarters. In addition, producers 
have also booked about 80 rooms at 
the Holiday Inn in Natchitoches. 

Most of the filming will take 
place in Natchitoches. A segment 
featuring a football game will be filmed 
in Mansfield. Mansfield was selected 
because its stadium had a "country 
look." 

The Christmas Lights Festival 
will be filmed sometime in August. 
AccordingVoTheNatchitochesTimes, 
the city of Natchitoches passed an 
emergency resolution to purchase 
$37,509 worth of lights. The lights 
will be placed by Augustl. 

The screenplay by Robert Har- 
ling, aNatchitoches native and North- 
western alumnus, is based on his 
popular Off-Broadway stage play of 
Steel Magnolias. The story was in- 
spired by Harling's sister and grow- 
ing up in Natchitoches. Steel Magno- 
lias is Harling's first writing effort. 

In the Thursday, May 23rd edi- 
tion of The Natchitoches Times, 



Maxwell Thomas said, 'Through the 
show, the viewer gains a private in- 
sight into the lives of six women and 
their personal strength to overcome 
the hardships of life, in spite of the 
stereotypical image of a beauty par- 
lor. Harling ingeniously transforms 
the parlor into a camouflaged bastion 
of human pride and courage in which 
the women reign from inside and the 
men stumble beyond its walls. 

Parton will portray Truvy, the 
owner of the beauty shop while Han- 
nah will portray Truvy's assistant, 
Annelle, a shy, quiet girl stranded by 
her husband. 

Clairee, widow of the late mayor 
whoowns half the town, will be played 
by MacLaine. Dukakis will portray 
Ouiser, the old, stingy woman who 
seemingly knows no kindness. 

The fifth character, Shelby, will 
be played by Roberts. Shelby, the 
center of the production's theme and 
action, is a diabetic determined to live 
a "normal"life. The role is based on 
Harling's sister who died of diabetes. 

M'Lynn is Shelby's mother. 
Portrayed by Field, the role demands 
a sensitivity that can convey the three 
fold scenario of M'Lynn's personal 
struggle, her daughter's difficulties 
and her indelible strength of charac- 
ter — otherwise known as steel mag- 
nolia. 

The production crew for Steel 
Magnolias is grateful for the coopera- f| 
tion given by the people of Natchito- 
ches and Northwestern. 



Sports Hall of Fame induction fete scheduled 



LISA DARDEN 
tfWrUer 

Northwestern plays host to a 
iety of events and activities during 
summer months including a folk 
•ival, athletic and cheerleader 
nps and summer school. 

One of the highlights of the 
!8 summer term is the Louisiana 
orts Hall of Fame's induction cere- 
nies to be held June 25 on 
thwestem's campus. 

The 1988 induction marks the 
h anniversary of the Hall and will 
'or 1 1 of the most celebrated adi- 
ts and coaches in the state's his- 
f. 

To be inducted into the shrine 
football greats Archie Manning, 
Jy Bradshaw and the late Tommy 
'% LSU national football cham- 
11 coach Paul Dietzel, Olympic track 
Imedal winners Willie Davenport 
1 Rod Milburn, long-time North- 
'Louisiana basketball coach Lenny 
"i major league pitching star J.R. 
tard and basketball standouts Elvin 
»es, Bill Reigel and Greg Procell. 
of the inductees will attend the 
'•■nonies except Davis, who will be 
5 gnized posthumously. 

The 1988 induction will in- 
^ membership in the Hall of Fame 
'18. The Hall of Fame is consid- 
% the Louisiana Sports Writers 
^iation the highest honor avail- 
• to coaches and athletes in Louisi- 



The Louisiana Sports Hall of 
Fame was established in 1958 by the 
Louisiana Sports Writers Association 
to honor outstanding athletic figures. 
The Hall was moved to Natchitoches 
in 197 1 . Since the move, 66 of the 107 
members were inducted at Northwest- 
em. ' * 

The induction is expected to 
draw coaches, athletic directors, sports 
media representatives and Hall of 
Famers inducted in previous years to 
Northwestern 's campus. 

Throughout the years, the Hall 
of Fame inductions attracted such 
nationally-accalimed sports stars as 
Pete Maravick, Billy Cannon, Joe 
Adcock, John David Crow, Max 
McGee, Johnny Robinson, Willie 
Davis, Tommy Mason, Mel Pamell, 
Bob Pettit, Willie Reed, Jerry Stovall, 
Y.A. Tittle, Jimmy Taylor, Tank 
Younger, Charley McClendon, Ralph 
Garr, Eddie Robinson, Willie Brown, 
Tommy Casanova, Bert Jones and 
Buck Buchanan. 

Despite the bright past, few 
induction programs have featured a 
more impressive collection of hon- 
oreesasdoes 1988's. Bradshaw guided 
the Pittsburgh Steelers to four Super 
Bowl championships, and Manning 
was Player of the Year and Most 
Valuable Player in the National Foot- 
ball Conference in 1978 while quar- 
terbacking the Saints. Manning also 
played in two Pro Bowls. 



Davis made 99.4 percent of his 
extra points in 1 1 years as a kicker in 
the NFL, and his career punting aver- 
age of 44.6 was second on the all-time 
NFL list at the time of his retirement. 
He played on the 1958 LSU team 
coached by Dietzel that won the na- 
tional championship. In seven years 
as coach at LSU, Dietzel guided the 
Tigers to an 18-game win streak and 
three finishes in the top three in the 
nation. 

Hayes was the Sporting News' 
college basketball Player of the Year 
at Houston in 1968. He was later 
named All-NBA six times and played 
in 12 NBA All-Star games. Reigel, 
who led McNeese to a 50- 1 5 record in 
two years, was the nation's top colle- 
giate basketball scorer as a senior with 
a 33.9 average. Procell is the nation's 
top high school basketball scorer of 
all time. He had a 37.2 per game 
average at Ebarb High. 

Milburn was the Olympic 
Games high hurdles gold medalist in 
1972 at Munich after an All-America 
career at Southern. He was named 
MostOutstandingAthletein the World 
in 1971. Davenport competed in four 
Olympic Games and at one time held 
the Olympic record in the high hurdles. 
He won the gold medal in the 120- 
yard high hurdles in the 1968 Olym- 
pic Games in Mexico City. Davenport 
later attended an Olympic Games 



series as a member of the American 
bobsled team. 

Richard pitched in the major 
leagues for 15 years and had 1,498 
strikeouts in 1 .606 innings. He led the 
National League in ERA in 1979 with 
2.71 and set a modern league record 
for most strikeouts by arighthander in 
a season with 313 in 292 innings. 
During his career with the Houston 
Astros, Richard compiled 107 games 
in his favor. Fanl, head coach at North- 
east for 22 years, had 18 consecutive 
winning seasons. His Northeast teams 
won eightconfercnce championships, 
12 tournament championships and 
helped make basketball a major sport 
in Louisiana. 

In addition to the induction 
ceremonies, day-long activities have 
been scheduled for the event. The day 
will kick off with an 8:30 a.m. conti- 
nental breakfast at the Natchitoches 
Country Club followed by a 9 a.m. 
news conference with the inductees. 

A Hall of Fame Golf Tourna- 
ment is slated for 10:30 a.m. at the 
Natchitoches Country Club and 
Northwestern ' s Recreation Complex . 
Entry fee is $30. The entry fee in- 
cludes the continental breakfast and 
news conference. 



See Fame 

Page 2 




emon pitchers drafted by Astros, Indians for minor play 





#11 ill 



Kenny Morris 



Bob Kairis 



By TOM WANCHO 
Contributor 

Northwestern's pitching staff, 
considered the best in the Southland 
Conference last year, will have twoof 
its members pitching in the minor 
leagues this summer after both Kenny 
Morris and Bob Kairis were selected 
in Thursday's major league draft. 

Morris, arighthander from Bul- 
lard, Texas, was the 22nd round selec- 
tion of the Houston Astros. Morris 
was the workhorse of the Demon staff, 
going to the mound for 85 innings of 
work. His five wins ranked second on 
the squad and his 56 strikeouts were 
the third most by a Demon pitcher. 

Kairis, who went in the 23rd 



round to the Cleveland Indians, is 
Northwestern's season record holder 
for strikeouts after sending 103 bat- 
ters back to their dugouts this year. 
The native of Country side, 111. , fanned 
1 02 batters in 1 987 and fell one strike- 
out shorts of setting a new career 
whiff mark. 

Kairis led the Demons this year 
in wins with seven and was one of just 
two pitchers to register an earned run 
average under the 4.00 mark with a 
3.72 effort. 

Morris will report to Auburn, 
New York, and Kairis goes to B urling- 
ton, N.C. , later this week. Both will be 
involved in rookie league ball this 
summer. 




Sally Field 



Dolly Parton 

VSR ' 1 "<» 




Shirley MacLaine 



Olympia Dukakis 




Daryl Hannah 



Julia Roberts 




Ray Stark 
Producer 



Herbert Ross 
Director 



Northwestern newscast 
to air here Wednesday 



By LISA DARDEN 
Staff Writer 

Northwestern students are mak- 
ing the news — literally. 

Tune in 6 p.m. Wednesday on 
Channel 2 for a first at Northwestern. 
The first campus news broadcast to be 
aired on television. 

The broadcast, created and pro- 
duced by students, features changes at 
Northwestern during the 1 987-88 year. 
The show's format includes such 
changes as dorm renovations, enroll- 
ment, Scholars' College and sports 
facility improvements. 

The Northwestern broadcast will 
be aired on a local time slot of the 
Christian Broadcast Network (CBN). 
Natchitoches Cable Television is not 
charging Northwestern for air time. 

Work on the 30 minute news- 
cast began last semester. Students 
enrolled in Advanced Television 
Production 3460 worked toward cre- 
ating a half hour newscast including 
original interviews and footage. All 
scripts for the newscast were written 
and edited by students. 



Under the guidance of adjunct 
professor Connie LeDoux, the stu- 
dents implemented four remote cam- 
eras and editing equipment recently 
purchased by the Journalism Depart- 
ment 

The purpose of the newscast was 
to let students experience firsthand 
the journalistic responsibility of re- 
porting news seen by the public. 

Of the production LeDoux said, 
"Some parts are shakey but it is a good 
first effort. Things can only get better 
from here." 

LeDoux, who produced the 10 
p.m. news for WAFB-TV in Baton 
Rouge prior to returning to school, 
said the newscast was the testing 
waters for Northwestern and cable 
television. Most major universities 
with broadcast journalism programs 
offer students practical experience 
through the production and airing of a 
weekly or monthly newscast show. 

"We're looking for feedback on 
our first try," LeDoux said. LeDoux 
hopes that Northwestern may some- 
day acquire a regular newscast pro- 
duction. 



Page 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



June 7, 



une 7, 



NEWS 




EDIT 



Media Board selects 1988-89 editors, manager for publications, radio Sor 



By H. SCOTT JOLLEY 
StaffWriter 

The Northwestern Media Board 
has recently selected four students as 
heads of the student media here on 
campus. They are Scot Jenkins for 
KNWD, the campus radio station; 
Gynger Ingram for Argus, 
Northwestem'sannual literary maga- 
zine; Tina Dutile for NSU's year- 
book, the Potpourri; and Sonya Ri- 
gaud for the Current Sauce, the cam- 
pus paper. 

Jenkins, a senior from Many, is 
now KNWD' s station manager. He's 
not sure how KNWD will manage this 
summer, due to lack of personnel. 
"We have only a few guys working 
now, but if we get some of the people 
who have had some experience with 
the station, we'll go on air." 

The station's weekly air time 
will be somewhat limited, with broad- 
casts beginning at noon and ending at 
midnight. KNWD's format will also 
undergo slight changes. "We won't 
have as much progressive music as we 
have had in the past. KNWD will play 
AOR (album oriented rock), with some 
progressive shows. We want to move 
towards more AOR than anything 
else." 

He hopes that, after summer, 



KNWD will be able to hold fundrais- 
ers and special events that will benefit 
the station. "I'm looking for another 
KNWD Week, with the live band and 
party outside the station," said Jen- 
kins. "It will increase campus aware- 
ness of KNWD." 

Ingram, a senior from Shre- 
veport, has been named editor of Ar- 
gus and has a 'Ten Point Plan" for the 
magazine's improvement. One of her 
main points is "computerization. I 
understand that a Macintosh computer 
has been ordered for use by the Argus 
staff." Familiar in its use, Ingram 
plans to use the new system to its 
fullest potential. 

Some of her other points in- 
clude improved relations with the 
student media, early solicitation of 
judges, and the organization of files 
and old manuscripts. Ingram also 
plans to provide both the university 
and public libraries with copies of the 
literary magazine: "Argus is an exten- 
sion and a representation of North- 
western State University. Boxes of 
old magazines sit in piles in the Argus 
office. I would like to see those 
magazines speaking for our univer- 
sity. Let the public see the talents of 
Northwestern." 

Ingram hopes to make Argus a 
"clean, quality, professional publica- 
tion that truly reflects high standards 



of both content and production. My 
magazine will be a proud representa- 
tion of Northwestern." 

A junior from Natchitoches, 
Dutile will be editor for the 1988- 
1989 Potpourri. Despite several prob- 
lems, she has high hopes for the coming 
year. "First, I want to feature this 
summer's events in the book." she 
said. "Thethingswe'redoingnoware 
important, but sometimes they get left 
out" 

Having no staff to work with, 
Dutile still expects the best. "I was 
named editor right before finals and 
after that, everybody had left for home. 
I'm still working on getting some 
people, however." Formerly section 
editor of the campus book, she was 
also editor of the Chinquapin , Natchi- 
toches Central High School's year- 
book 

As of now, several plans are in 
motion, namely one to create a theme 
(oTthe Potpourri. "I haven't come up 
with one yet, but I'm still trying. I 
want to have almost total coverage on 
campus, so I'm working on that as- 
pect." 

Editor of the Current Sauce, 
Rigaud is a senior from Morgan City. 
She hopes to make major changes in 
the campus paper. "I'm changing the 
whole paper, basically. I've changed 
the paper's masthead, the typeface, 



and even totally redesigned the edito- 
rial page." 

She also plans to assign differ- 
ent pages to different staffers, which 
will sp eed up the paste-up process. "I 
hope to limit the procrastination this 
year,' said Rigaud, who was both a 
staff writer and managing editor on 
last year's Current Sauce. "As editor, 
I have a chance to work with layout 
more than in the past" 

Rigaud hopes that this year's 
paper may attract more Scholar's 
College students. She plans to work 
with Counselor Don Barker in recruit- 
ing Scholar' s College students as staff 
members. "In the past, there has been 
a lot of conflict between us and the 
Scholar's College. I hope to change 
all that" 

The four students had to submit 
applications to the Northwestern 
Media Board, which is comprised of 
three faculty members and three stu- 
dents. The Media Board then held 
personal interviews with each appli- 
cant and later made recommendations 
to the Student Government Associa- 
tion (SGA). The SGA has yet to 
approve the recommendations given 
to them by the Media Board. While 
members of the Media Board, Jour- 
nalism coordinator Tommy 
Whitehead and Media Board head 
Jerry Pierce did not vote on the appli- 
cants. 




Scot Jenkins 
KNWD-FM 



Gynger Ingram 
Argus 




NSU summer session, workshops gets underway 

Companies who supply edu- 
cational materials are taking advan- 
tage of the situation and setting up 
tables to exhibit their products. Puzzles 
and computers are on display for teach- 
ers to consider taking home to class- 
rooms iii their parish. 

Residing in Natchitoches Hall, 
Gremillion said she was ready to come 
back to school. 



Tina Dutile 
Potpourri 



By CONNIE LEDOUX 
StaffWriter 

Books bought and suitcases 
unpacked, Michelle Gremillion is 
ready for the summer session at North- 
western. 

"I tried to get a summer job, 
but plans fell through, so my second 
choice was coming to school," Gre- 
million said. 

Enrollment figures aren't of- 
ficial yet, but hundreds of other stu- 
dents are on campus attending classes. 
Northwestern's summer session be- 
gan June 3rd and runs through the end 
of July. During the eight week term, 
two workshops of intensive study will 



be held. Workshops run three weeks 
and meet four days a week for several 
hours. 

At the Housing Office, Direc- 
tor Harold Boutte is busy. His office 
reported more than 200 students liv- 
ing on campus. Boutte said Natchito- 
ches Hall is housing undergraduate 
students, while Boozman Hall resi- 
dents are graduate students. The other 
housing facilities on campus are being 
used by high schools from across the 
state for cheerleading cl inics and lead- 
ership workshops. Boutte said the 
activity calendar for his department is 
full during the summer months. 

"The campus and the facili- 



ties we have here are excellent for 
these high school clinics. Young 
people come on campus and have a 
good time.If they like it here, they 
may decide to attend college here, and 
that's what we want" Boutte said. 

Across campus in the Teacher 
Education Center the parking lot is 
full of cars bumper to bumper. Louisi- 
ana teachers, on break from their own 
jobs, are in the classroom continuing 
their education. 

Other education officials will 
be on campus this summer. Superin- 
tendents and principals from across 
the state will meet and exchange ideas 
in conferences. 



"It was nice having a break 
for a few weeks, but I was getting 
bored. The walls in my dorm room are 
thin so I'm going to have to find a 
place where I can study and get my 
work done," Gremillion said. 



ALV1N DHBLIEUX, R.PH. 




UNIVERSITY PHARMAC 
AND GIFTS 



Hours:8a.m. to 6p.m. 
Monday-Saturday 



Writer 

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Sonya Rigaud 
Current Sauce 



926 College Avenue, Natchitoches LA 71457 
352-9740 



Demon Olympic hopefuls capture honors 



After Hours:352-492$ket. I can ji 
or352-424toningfort 

, iace a year i 

A gre 
tlieve sumr 
ent doing 
ever yc 



ByTOMWANCHO 
Contributor 

Llewellyn Starks introduced a 
new training method and Brian Brown 
passed a gut check as ihe two most 
prominent jumpers in Northwestern 
State track and field history claimed 
all- America honors for the second time 
in three months at last week's NCAA 
outdoor trackand field championships. 

Not as fortunate was the De- 
mons' 400 meter relay team, com- 
posedof Al Edwards, Kenneth DeWitt, 
Edgar Cooper, and Chester Davis. 
Trying to win all-America recogni- 
tion for the second time in as many 
years, the NSU foursome failed to 
qualify for the finals, falling three one 
hundredths short after a time of 39. 82. 
It was a small consolation to know 
that the Demons were running in the 
fastest preliminary, a race won by 
eventual national champion Texas 
A&M. 

Starks, who severely pulled a 
hamstring in the Southland Confer- 
ence meet on April 29, hadn't jumped 
competitively in over a month. After 



Fame 

continued from page 1 

A reception in the Hall of Fame 
area of Northwestern's Prather Coli- 
seum is schedule for 5:30 p.m. with 
the induction banquet beginning 7 p.m. 
in the Friedman Student Union Ball- 
room. Banquet tickets are $15 and 
allow admission to the reception, 
banquet and a post-banquet reception 
with the new inductees at the Holiday 
Inn. 

For ticket information and res- 
ervations write: Louisiana Sports Hall 
of Fame, Northwestern State Univer- 
sity, Natchitoches, LA 71497. Checks 
should be made payable to the Louisi- 
ana Sports Hall of Fame. 

Both the induction banquetand 
the golf tournament have attracted 
capacity crowds over the years and 
reservations for both events are ac- 
cepted on a first-come, first-served 
basis. 



qualifying on Wednesday evening, the 
Jonesboro native unleashed a school 
record jump of 27-7 3/4 inches on 
Friday to place third in the nation and 
ahead of arch-rival Andre Ester of 
Northeast Louisiana University. 

"What's amazing is that three 
quarters of an inch separated second 
through fifth place," said assistant 
coach Steve Thomas. "Llewellyn is 
ready to pop a 27 foot jump. His speed 
down the runway is unbelievable." 

Starks, who is just a sophomore, 
already had two indoor all-America 
certificates in his possession before 
addi^s his outdoor award last week- 
end. 

Something else that was unbe- 
lievable-sort of — was Brown's per- 
formance. "Considering what he was 
up against, he did well just to qualify 
for li;e finals," Thomas reported. 
Brown has been bothered by a deeply 
bruised heel, a condition made worse 
after a callus decided to take up resi- 
dence, making walking a tough task 
and jumping an unthinkable one. 



Brown, who last year finished 
fifth in the nation outdoors, jumped 
higher at 7-3 3/4 in finishing sixth, 
achieving all- America status for the 
third time (once indoors, twice out- 
doors). 

Thanks solely to Starks and 
Brown, NSU finished in a tie for 3 1st 
as a team with nine points, ahead of 
such nationally known powerhouses 
as Alabama, Georgia, Baylor, and 
Ohio State. Northeast Louisiana was 
easily the highest ranked Southland 
Conference school, finishing in 11th 
place overall. 



Starks and Brown, both of whom 
have qualified for the United States 
Olympic Trials, will be in action next 
at the Track Athletics Congress Sen- 
iors meet, to be held in Tampa, Flor- 
ida, on June 16-18. Also on the sched- 
ule before the mid- July trials is a stop 
at the Steve Prefontaine Classic on 
July 2, which will be run on the same 
track in Eugene as the NCAA's. 






Llewellyn Starks 



Brian Brown 



Needed: 
Writers for summer 
Current Sauce 
Contact: 
Steve Horton, Kyser 103, 357-5213 
or 

Sonya Rigaud, 357-5456 



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ne 7,1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



editorial 



r 



o Northwestern summer fun activities outlined 




USA DARDEN 
Writer 



It's "the good ole summertime" 
western and students enrolled 
jltie summer term can expect to see 
jvie stars, producers and camp kids 
«ring the campus. 
However, for those students 
ig more than stargazing and 
itseeing, Northwestern offers 
er and leisure activities. 
Although the Student Activities 
d (S AB) will be spending most of 
time and energy on planning 
ts for the fall and spring semes- 
SAB has tentatively planned 
kjviues for the summer term, ac- 
''ng to Carl Henry, director of 
uzations and Activities. 
Tentative summer activities 
i several ice cream parties and 
in Friedman Student Union. 
iB will set dates for the activities in 
peering later this week. Each event 
J be publicized. 



For those with free time, North- 
western also offers a variety of leisure 
activities. Perfect for summer, all one 
needs in order to enjoy the activities is 
a Northwestern student ID. The fol- 
lowing facilities are deigned for stu- 
dents and require presentation of stu- 
dent ID: 

—Robert W. Wilson, Sr. Rec- 
reation Complex , located on the High- 
way 1 Bypass, offering four tennis 
courts, Olympic-sized swimming 
pool, driving range and nine-hole 
golf course. (Small green' s fee charged 
for golf). Also available at the Com- 
plex are water aerobics. For additional 
information call 352-6134. 

— Canoe Shed, on Chaplin's 
Lake, offering canoes, pedal boats 
and wind surf boards. Weather per- 
mitting, the Canoe Shed is open 2:30 
to 5:30 every day of the week except 
Friday. 

— Recreation and Intramural 
Building offering basketball, volley- 
ball, racquetball, pool and a variety of 



indoor games for those desiring in- 
door activities. Open throughout the 
summer term. For additional informa- 
tion call 357-5461. 

— Ski boat on Sibley Lake, 
scheduling and use guidelines cur- 
rently being established. Contact the 
Division of Leisure Activities and 
Recreational Sports, 357-5461. 

For students living on campus 
this summer, dorm life itself offers a 
break from studies. On-campus stu- 
dents living in Natchitoches Hall can 
enjoy volleyball in the courtyard or 
Ping-pong and foosball in the lobby. 
And then there's always the great 
American pastime — TV. Summer is 
the best time to catch up on all the 
soaps and the Andy Griffith reruns 
you might have missed during the 
busy spring semester. If you're lucky 
enough to know someone with a VCR, 
you can always enjoy a weekend long 
movie marathon. 

For students with meal tickets 



or a little cash, an af ternoon or eve- 
ning meal in Itza Pizza, located on the 
first floor of the Student Union is a 
great way to spend time. Students can 
enjoy a number of video games, pool 
or the big screen TV while waiting for 
their pizza. 

And for the health conscious, 
there's nothing like an early morning 
or late evening stroll or bike ride 
around Northwestern 's beautiful 
campus. One can visit the historic 
columns, stroll along Chaplin's Lake 
or plan a walk around the perimeter. 



Although the university offers a 
variety of events, some students like 
nothing better than grabbing a book 
and blanket, heading down to 
Chaplin ' s Lake and spending a restful 
day sunning or studying. Whatever 
the occasion and whatever the mood, 
students are bound to find something 
pleasant about summer at Northwest- 
ern. 



f SU vacation education 
\rime time to get ahead 



AN DA HAMILTON 
(fWriter 

Summertime. What is it for? I 
among the few people who don't 
bow exacdy what to do during the 
unmer. I am always in a hurry for 
inmer vacation and then when it 
■ones I try and find ways to make the 
lyspass. 

My idea of the perfect summer 
R, R Pfculd be an all expense paid vacation 
some far away place where every- 

\ /pi* y° u ^ ' oves to near vour ^ e 

\\j uryandtreatyoulikethequeenyour 
mily overlooks. 

So far no one has presented me 



r| 457 iiih an airline ticket or told me to get 
« passport so maybe that's next 
miner's vacation. Yeah, that's the 

1- 492%et I can just see my family busily 

2- 424(bming for the trip of my life to take 
bee a year from now. 

A great majority of people 
elieve summertime is meant to be 
je nt doing nothing of importance. 
>jiliatever you can do that requires 



litde thought or planning is what a 
summer vacation is made of. For 
those of you who don't know what I 
am talking about, read on. 

You should fill your days with 
meaningless activities like watching 
All My Children, eating everytime you 
yawn, putting another roll of tissue on 
the holder and filling up the ice trays. 
With the right sort of mind, the above 
activities could fill up 12 hours of a 
day. 

Another way of spending your 
summer vacation would be to attend 
summer school. Yes, summer school. 
I know this isn't the dream vacation 
you've been waiting for all semester, 
but it's not the end of the world. This 
gives a lot of people a chance to get 
ahead, or retake the course they lost 
interest in towards the end of last 
semester. 

Whatever you decide to do with 
your summer vacation, get started. 
S ummer will be over before you know 
it 





Natchitoches . . . 
the RIGHT choice 




•s. 

I. 



ARGUS 

As many of you may know, Argus was a bit delayed 
is year. However, the magazines are on campus and 
tdily available. Anyone who was unable to get a copy 
before the end of the spring but would like one now may 
Pick one up at the Argus office, 3rd floor of Kyser Hall or 
media boxes located in Kyser and the Student Union. 



By SONYA RIGAUD 
Editor 

Well, it's about time! They fi- 
nally made the choice, and in my 
opinion that choice is the RIGHT 
choice. 

So many minds have been 
wondering and hoping these past few 
weeks and now . . . their wishing is 
over. Those "movie people," as ev- 
eryone is calling them, decided after 
careful observation and study to film 
Robert Harling's Steel Magnolias in 
Natchitoches. 

Just think of the star-studded 
cast being here . . . right in our own 
back yard. 

I can remember when Long Hot 
Summer was filmed near my home in 
South Louisiana. And I also remem- 
ber when Bo and Hope from daytime 
soap opera Days of Our Lives also 
came down to shoot a few scenes at 
Oak Alley. It was really exciting, but 
this is a heck of a lot better. 

Sure, Don Johnson and Cybil 
Sheppard were really popular back 
then, and perhaps still are. And Bo 
and Hope were the most loved couple 
in daytime television back then. 

We've got a cast full of great 
actresses who appeal to people of all 
kinds. And personally, my favorite of 
the group is Daryl Hannah. I've never 
seen her in a movie I didn't like. 

This isn ' t a soap opera that only 



housewives can view and this isn't a 
Sunday night movie. It's a motion 
picture, and Natchitoches is the center 
of attention. 

Steel Magnolias can and will be 
a great asset to this community and 
this university. It will generate a great 
sum of money in our area and may 
even attract more students, which will 
generate even more money. And we 
all know how much Natchitoches and 
Northwestern need that. 

There is one thing about the 
movie which is kind of bothersome 
however. E ve heard that everyone who 
attends die Natchitoches Christmas 
Lights Festival will be asked to wear 
sweaters and coats. You know, stuff 
for winter. 

Well, we'd better hope for an 
early winter, because they plan to film 
the festival sometime in August. But 
to tell you the truth, I've never worn a 
sweater or a coat in the past three 
years at the normal time, the first 
weekend in December. 

Oh, I guess I can suffer a litde in 
the hope of maybe, just maybe, hog- 
ging a litde bit of space on that silver 
screen. 

All in all, I think that the movie 
will have a positive effect on the 
Natchitoches community and North- 
western. And after all, what better 
place is there to film a movie based in 
Natchitoches than in . . . yes, you 
guessed it, . . . Natchitoches? 



Write a letter to the editor 



Current Sauce 




The Current Sauceis published weekly during the 
ol and springsemesters by the students ofNorthwest- 
rn State University of Louisiana, ft is not associated 
fith any of the University's departments and Is fi- 
nanced independently. 

The Current Sauce is based in the Office of 
tudent Publications located in Kyser Ha8. The office 
f the ediforiaUtaff is 225H, telephone (3 1 8) 357-5456. 
he adviser's office is 103 Kyser He*, telephone 357- 
'13. 

The mailing address for the Current Sauceis P.O. 
8ox 5306, NSU, Natchitoches, LA 71497. 

All correspondence, including letters to the edl- 
rfe welcome. Material submitted for consideration 
lust be moiled to the above address or brought to 
office. 

The deadSne for ail advertisement and copy a 3 
•m. each Friday, Inclusion of any and all material is 
ft to the discretion of the editor. 

Letters to the editor shouid be typed (double- 
oced). signed and should incfejde a telephone 
srnber where the writer can be reached. No anony- 
ous letters will be printed. 

Current Sauce subscription rates are jSTl per 
ademic year (28 issues) or S6 per semester (14 
ues). The paper is entered as second-class mail at 
Natchitoches. LA. The USPS number is 140-66C. 



SONYA RIGAUD 

Editor 

LISA DARDEN 
SCOTT JOLLEY CONNIE LEDOUX 
WANDA HAMILTON 

Staff Writers 

ALLEN EVANS 
Advertising Manager 

DAN DUPRE JOE ROBERTSON 
Photographers 

EDD LEE 

C irculationinistribution 

STEVE HORTON 
Adviser 



Summer 9 88 



WE HAVE A COLLECT 
CALL TO ANYONE FROM 
A MR. yCQUBS (JDOS70AU! 
^WiLL VOU ACCEPT 
THE CHARGE 5 ? 




How do you think the filming of 
Steel Magnolias will affect North- 
western and the Natchitoches 
community? 





Mark Mayfield 

Senior 

Shreveport 

"/ believe that this movie 

venture will give much needed 

summer jobs to university stu- 
dents." 



Emilyn Matthews 
Graduate student 
Natchitoches 

"/ believe that Steel 
Magnolias coming to Natchitoches 
and Northwestern will have one of 
the greatest economic impacts that 
we have ever felt." 





Angela Gentry 

Senior 

Many 

"Steel Magnolias will boost 
Natchitoches economically and 
socially. I think Northwestern will 
benefit from the movie's national 
attention it is bound to receive." 



Paul Price 
Senior 
Cloutierville 

"/ believe the movie Steel 
Magnolias will be one of the great- 
est economic boosts that Natchito- 
ches has ever felt. Also, I think this 
movie will bring summer jobs to the 
college students." 





Allen Evans 

Junior 

Natchitoches 

-. & 

"I think the filming of this 
movie inNatchitoches will not only 
have a great economic impact hut it 
will also add some excitement to 
this boring community and give 
people here something to talk 
about." 



Brenda Winbarg 
Graduate student 
Natchitoches 

"I believe that the filming of 
Steel Magnolias in the Natchito- 
ches-Northwestern community will 
be well received by everyone and 
will boost the economic situation in 
our parish." 



Page 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



June 7, 19 8i 



CAMPUS LINE 



— - 



Academic scholarships 

Eighty-seven academically-tal- 
ented high school seniors from Lou- 
isiana and Texas have been awarded 
four-year, $5,000 academic scholar- 
ships to enroll this fall as freshmen at 
Northwestern State University. 

The Northwestern Academic 
Scholarship, awarded for eight semes- 
ters or until the student receives the 
bachelor's degree, is the university's 



Football grades 

Twelve Northwestern State 
football players have made the Dean ' s 
List for the 1988 spring semester, 
academic coordinator Donnie Cox 
reported. The dozen Demon Dean's 
Liststudents include: Darryl Andrews, 
3.06 in business; Milton Constran- 
sitch, 4.0 in zoology/pre-med; Ran- 
dolph Hayes, 3.0 in biology; John 
King, 3.0 in general curriculum; Orlan 



most prestigious award and is granted Lockhart, 3.18 in physical therapy; 
to high school seniors with superior MarkMayfield,3.0in journalism; Jay 

Roy Mount, 3.5 in physical educa- 
tion; Mike O'Neal, 3.5 in physical 
therapy; Andrew Roach, 3.06 in gen- 
eral curriculum ; Billy S tevens, 3 .33 in 
computer science; Leonard Parker, 3.7 
in physical education; Adam Pierre, 



academic potential 

NS U president Dr. Robert Alost 
said the recipients of academic schol- 
arships to Northwestern were selected 
on the basis of their excellent aca- 
demic record, extra-curricular activi- 
ties, and service to their school and 3.0 in nursing. 



community. 



The academic turnaround at 
Northwestern State during headcoach 
Sam Goodwin's tenure is a remark- 
able one. Just three years ago, some 
44 players were enrolled in summer 
school. This year, ten Demons are 
attending summer sessions, along with 
many others who are taking summer 
classes not to become eligible but to 



Nursing scholarships 

Eleven graduating high school 
seniors have been awarded $500 
Freshman Nursing Scholarships for 
the 1988-89 academic year at North- 
western State University. 

The scholarship recipients, who pick up extra courses that will permit 
will enroll this fall as first-year stu- an on time graduation date, 
dents in the four-year baccalaureate 
degree program in nursing, were se- 
lected on the basis of academic rec- 
ord, extra-curricular activities and 
service to their school and commu- 
nity. 

Recipients are Kimberly Akin 
and Shannon Stringer of South wood 
High School in Shreveport; Jennifer 
Boulet of the Academy of the Sacred 
Heart in Grand Coteau, Rebecca Davis 
of O. Perry Walker High Schpol in 
New Orleans, Lesia Fleming of 
Haughton High School, Daniel Green 
of Capt. Shreve High School in Shre- 
veport, Melinda Parker of Natchito- 
ches Central High School, Shavannia 
Smith of Leesville High School, 
Tommy Stainbrook of Huntington 
High School in Shreveport, Miranda 
Tingle of Ringgold High School and 
Freda Toms of Saline High School. 



Dunagan 

A retirement reception honor- 
ing Northwestern State University 
professor Dr. Tommy S. Dunagan will 
be held today from 2:30 p.m. until 4 
p.m . at the Orville Hanchey Gallery in 
the A.A. Fredericks Creative and 
Performing Arts Center at Northwest- 
ern. 

Dunagan has served Northwest- 
em for 25 years as a professor of 
industrial technology and the director 
of University Printing Services. 



Cheerleader clinic 

The first of three five-day ses- 
sions of the 34 th annual Northwestern 
State University Cheerleader Clinic 
began Sunday, June 5, on the NSU 
campus. 

The Universal Cheerleader 
Association is conducting the clinic, 
which is being coordinated by the 
Northwestern Office of Admissions 
and Recruiting. 

Sessions are scheduled for June 
5-9, June 12-16, and June 19-23. 

For further infoi mation , call the 
Northwestern Office of Admissions 
and Recruiting, (318) 357-4503. 



Auxiliary camp 

Northwestern State University ' s 
Auxiliary Camp for drum majors, 
twirlers and members of rifle and flag 
corps will be conducted June 19-24 
under the sponsorship of 
Northwestern's Departmentof Music 
and Theatre Arts. 

The six-day camp will offer 
instruction in beginner, intermediate 
and advanced levels of flag and twirl- 
ing performance, as well as all-pur- 
pose instruction for drum majors and 
rifle corps members. 

The Northwestern Auxiliary 
Camp will include fundamentals in- 
struction, group and school routine 
performances, competitions, recrea- 
tional activities, swimming, cook-outs, 
movies and a Friday morning exhibi- 
tion performance and awards cere- 
mony. 

The cost to participate is $150 
per student for on-campus stay, $75 
per student for commuters, and $50 
for a non-participant sponsor. 

For further information, call 
camp director Trish Crowder at (3 1 8) 
357-8677 or Pam ela Towry , assistant 
director of bands at Northwestern, 
(318)357-4522. 

Art exhibit 

Twenty-five Caddo Parish pub- 
lic school art teachers will be exhibit- 
ing more than 100 art works in a 
variety of media June 5-24 at the 
Orville Hanchey Gallery in the A.A. 
Fredericks Creative and Performing 
Arts Center at Northwestern State 
University. 

The three-week show officially 
opened Sunday, June 5, with a recep- 
tion honoring the artists and educators 
from 2 p.m. until 4 p.m. in the gallery 
under the sponsorship of the North- 
western Department of Art. 

Rivers Murphy, professor and 
chairman of the department* said many 
of the exhibitors in the show are gradu- 
ates of North western ' s undergraduate 
and graduate degree programs in art. 



1 1 ii 'in 



Demon baseballers 
named to SLC team 



By BRUCE GROEN 
Contributor 

Two members of NSU's base- 
ball team, which finished with a23-26 
overall mark, were named to the 
Southland Conference first team, 
while two others were listed as honor- 
able mention, according to confer- 
ence officials. 

Pitcher Bob Kairis joined out- 
fielder Dickey Marze on the first team , 
while pitcher Bob Ayo and second 
baseman John Surane were honorable 
mention. 

"It certainly is a great honor for 
us for them to be recognized," com- 
mented head coach Johnnie Emmons. 
"It really speaks high for the baseball 
program at NSU and shows the im- 
provement we've made through the 
year." 

Kairis was the team's leading 
winner from the mound, finishing his 
senior season with a 7-4 record. In the 
last game of the season vs. Northeast 
Louisiana, Kairis struck out eight 
batters and surpassed his own record 
for strikeouts in a season, finishing 
with 103, while walking only 24. 
Kairis concluded his two-year NSU 



Program begins 



career just one strikeout short of tying 
the career record of 206 "K's." 

"Bob is deserving of the honor ," 
added Emmons. "He will definitely 
be a tough one to replace." (Only six 
players graduated from the 1988 is- 
sue, but four of them were pitchers.) 

Marze finished his junior sea- 
son as the team's leading hitter, driv- 
ing 13 homers (second highest in a 
single season) and an incredible .657 
slugging percentage. Marze tied the 
season stolen base record, getting 
caught only once in 25 attempts. At 
one point in the season, Marze hit 
safely in 1 1 consecutive games, and 
finished the season with a .321 batting 
average. 

Ayo, a junior college transfer 
out of New Orleans had the squad's 
best ERA at 3.46. He finished with a 
4.6 record, but two of those losses 
came in extra innings. Ayo struck out 
61 while walking 24. 

Surane committed only seven 
errors in 235 chances at second base 
for a fielding percentage of .970. His 
.286 batting average was third best on 
the team, and he led the squad with 
three triples. Only a sophomore, Sur- 
ane was second with 17 stolen bases. 



A. Cu t *4bove 

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Mike 

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air 



SONYA RIC 
or 

More than 
jeered the oper 
pne 16-18 and J 
jjscovered. Indii 
forking as extra 
(action of Steel 
rill begin filmir 
jvited to attend 
ke A.A. Fredei 
WformingArts( 
fcstern. 



JloffCer 'Enchant 
Matrix Scruples 
217 Htvy. 1 South 
(across from Haqqio's) 
Natchitoches, LA 



S I like tc 
irtist. Yoi 
ilm that c 



Northwestern Abroad 
draws French students 



NEWS BUREAU— A group of 
11 high school students from the 
Bordeaux region of France will be in 
Natchitoches July 2-27 to participate 
in a "home stay" program that will 
expose them to the American way of 
life and the historically-rich cultures 
of the South. 

Northwestern Abroad, an inter- 
national travel-study experience of- 
fered by Northwestern State Univer- 
sity, is sponsoring the program in 
cooperation with the London, Eng- 
land-based Anglophiles Academic, an 
organization which helps European 
students travel to Great Britain and 
the United States for "home stay" 
programs scheduled during holidays 
and the summer. 

Dr. Grady Harper, Northwest- 
ern professor of art and acting director 
of Northwestern Abroad, said Jan 
Frederick of Natchitoches is coordi- 
nating the program with Ralph Sutton 
of London, president of Anglophiles 
Academic. 

According to Harper, each of 
the 1 7-year-old high-academic achiev- 
ers are staying in the homes of Natchi- 
toches host families and are given the 



opportunity to experience and partici- 
pate in the host family's normal, daily 
routines for work and play. 

Field trips have been scheduled 
for the students to visit major indus- 
tries in Baton Rouge and other cities 
in Louisiana. Lafayette will also be 
visited to expose the students from 
France to traditional Cajun culture. 

Harper said the students have 
completed six years of English lan- 
guage studies and have previously 
participated in two "home stay" pro- 
grams in Great Britain. 

The high school students are the 
children of parents who are employed 
in France's astronautical industry. 

"The students selected to come 
here," said Harper, "are from families 
which work for large corporations in 
France. A unique feature of the sys- 
tem in France are the fringe benefits 
workers receive for their children, 
whether educational or cultural." 

Harper said that through the 
North western Abroad program , plans 
are being made to establish an ex- 
change program which would send 
several students from Natchitoches to 
France for "home stay" experiences. 



WE WORK AS 
LATE AS YOU DO 




Whenever you need clear, quality copies, come to 
Kinko's. We're open early, open late, and open 
weekends. 



The session: 
hursday, June I 
ine 17, at 2 p.m. 
t9 a.m.; and Mc 
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eople 18 years c 
line 20 session v 
asting call for ch 
The June ] 
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Steel Magnolia extras, send 
photo and vital statistics to: 
Steel Magnolias, Extra Casting 
205 Highway 6 West 
Natchitoches, LA, 71457 



Coaching staffs to conduct summer camps 



ByTOMWANCHO 
Contributor 

Northwestern's various coach- 
ing staffs will be conducting numer- 
ous summer camps during the upcom- 
ing months. 

Northwestern men's basketball 
coach Don Beasley will be conduct- 
ing his camp from Sunday, June 26 
through Thursday, June 30. Beasley 
and his staff will hold three different 
workout sessions per day, with the 
first slated for 9:30 until 11 a.m. 
Another session goes from 2 until 4 
p.m. and the last session of the day 
gets underway at 7:30 and lasts until 
9:30 p.m. 

The camp is open for boys who 
are in the fourth through twelfth 
grades. Camp enrollment is limited to 
150. The cost to those staying on 
campus is $150 ($125 for each boy 
from the same family) and $135 for 
any 10 boys (or more) from the same 
school. Commuters pay $85 per boy. 

Softball Coach Rickey McCal- 
ister will be running the first annual 
Lady Demon sof tball camp during the 
same week as Beasley's basketball 
camp, June 26th through the 30th. At 
a cost of $75 for commuters and $140 
for those choosing to reside on cam- 
pus, McCalister and pitching instruc- 



tor Charles Dil will instruct on all 
facets of college softball, including 
base running, fielding, hitting, pitch- 
ing and fundamentals. 

McCalister will also be assisted 
by former Lady Demon standouts 
Ginger Craig, Missy Landreneau and 
Jeanne Di Vittorio, along with current 
players Anne LaHaye and Kellie 
Shotwell. 

Sam Goodwin will be running 
the Demon football camp from July 
10 through July 13. Many former 
Demons currently in the NFL will be 
on hand to assist Goodwin and Com- 
pany at this year's camp, the bulk of 
which will be held in Northwestern's 
astroturfed Turpin Stadium. 

Special instruction will be given 
in the areas of running, passing, punt- 
ing, place kicking, blocking, tackling, 
strength building, agility, quickness, 
theory, rules, play patterns, game 
films, leadership and sportsmanship. 

The registration fee for a resi- 
dent camper is $150 per person. The 
commuter fee is $75. 

The Lady Demon basketball 
camp will run from July 17 through 
July 21 at Northwestern's Prather 
Coliseum. Head Coach James Smith 
and his staff will conduct three daily 
sessions, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., 1 



until 3 p.m. and the last session from 
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. 

An added feature to the Lady 
Demon camp this year is that each girl 
will have the opportunity to have her 
shot analyzed by video tape. 

Any girl from the sixth through 
twelfth grades can attend at a cost oi 
$160 for those staying on campus. 
The cost to commuters is $90. Groups 
of 10 or more girls from the same 
school pay $150 apiece. 

All of those attending any of the 
Northwestern camp sessions receive 
a camp T-shirt and will have at their 
disposal the Northwestern Olympic- 
sized swimming pool, tennis courts, 
weight room and training room. 

All campers are covered by a 
specially set-up Northwestern insur- 
ance plan and those residing on cam- 
pus receive three meals a day at the 
Northwestern training table. 

For more information on the 
football camp, contact Don Shows at 
357-525 1 . More information can be 
obtained on both the Demons and 
Lady Demon basketball camp by call- 
ing Don Beasley or James Smith at 
357-5891. McCalister can also be 
reached for additional information on 
the Lady Demon softball camp at 357- 
5891. 



WHY GO TO SHREVEPORT OR 
ALEXANDRIA FOR EYEGLASSES? 



Is there another optical store in Natchitoches 
where you don't have to pay extra for ... 

1. oversize lenses 

2. extra charge for rimless 

3. extra charge for scratch coating 

4. extra charge for facet grinding 

5. extra charge for special base curves 



NO! 



ANTI-SCRATCH COATED 


Single Vision Plastic Lenses 


$4400 


Flat Top 28 Bifocals 


$5400 


7/28 Trifocals 


$7400 


Super No Line Lenses 


$9^00 


(The No Line, No Image Jump Lens) 






ByDAYNAD 
Staff Writer 

Members 
Fraternity have 
move into their 
across from 
Construction o 
during spring b 
planning. The h 
completed at the 
but furnishing ; 
still in progress 
Joe Robei 

BOS3IEHi AllenEvans - ai1 

packed up and a 

^residence on th 
f son and Caspar 
Having eij 
house can sleep 
■There are also 
jone complete \ 
stalls, akitchen, 
Shd storage roo 
Jonathan 
Member of Kap 
P a mass of ar 
•hat others cai 
achieve." 

When aske 
,*ould affect fall 
re positive. 
"Thehous 
use it is m 
Meeting place, 1 
»een successful 
jtouse anyway," 
J^appa Sigma all 
Repp said, 
kapart of then 



3 HOUR SERVICE ON MOST 
PRESCRIPTIONS 



* DIVISION Of Vf 0**«tHM,MlCS 



Exchange^ 




over 1000 

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ON DISPLAY! 

318-352-1056 

Call for appointment 
M-F 9am-5pm Sat. 9am 3pm 
walk-ins accepted, contact lens fittings 
by appointment only 




220 Keyser Avenue 
Natchitoches,. LA 



1 




7.1' 





JUNE 21, 1988 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 
OF LOUISIANA 



VOL. 77, NO. 2 



16 



Campus swarms with hopefuls answering movie casting call 



SONYA RIGAUD 
jitor 

More than 9,500 people an- 
gered the open casting calls held 
pie 16-18 and June 20 hoping to be 
jscovered. Individuals interested in 
working as extras in the Rastar Pro- 
jpction of Steel Magnolias, which 
fill begin filming on July 12, were 
ivited to attend the casting calls in 
A.A. Fredericks Creative and 
erforming Arts Center here at North- 
ptern. 



es 



Bill Dance.extras casting direc- 
tor for the picture, used the open cast- 
ing calls to look for people of varied 
ages and characteristics. 

Dance said the purpose of the 
calls was to allow him to begin devel- 
oping files on individuals who are 
available to serve as extras for the 
picture. 

The sessions were informative, 
with Dance outlining the procedures 
of working as extras and summarizing 
the plot of the movie. Those individu- 



I like to term what I cast as a background 
itist. You are the breath that comes out of the 
ilm that does not speak." 

—Bill Dance 

Extras Casting Director 



9 



« } The sessions were scheduled for 
hursday, June 16, at 9 am.; Friday, 
ine 17, at 2 p.m.; Saturday, June 18, 
[9 am.; and Monday, June 20, at 3 
jn. The June 16-18 sessions were for 
eople 18 years of age or older. The 
ine 20 session was a separate open 
asting call for children only. 

The June 16-18 sessions at- 
acted about 4,700 people, while 
bnday ' s session attracted over 5 ,000 
others and children. Of Monday's 
tssion Tommy Whitehead, local 
ontact, said, "It's one of the biggest 
rowds in the history of Northwestern 
r a non-athletic event" 



- 



als who attended were informed of 
responsibilities as extras, pay scale 
and other useful information. 

Dance had all applicants in the 
auditorium fill out forms during the 
June 16-18 sessions. Usual informa- 
tion such as name, address, phone and 
social security number was asked to 
be reported. Applicants were asked to 
give shoe, waist and bust sizes along 
with information on formal wear, 
casual wear and sports wear. 

Dance started each session by 
giving background information about 
himself, the movie, the actresses and 
the production team. 




'ampus fraternity house 
welcomes first residents 



not 



OS9IER 
8155 



!? 




VI 



ByDAYNADOOLEY 
Staff Writer 

Members of Kappa Sigma 
Fraternity have already begun to 
move into their new house located 
across from Chaplin's Lake. 
Construction of the house began 
during spring break after a year of 
planning. The house was basically 
completed at the beginning of June, 
but furnishing and landscaping is 
Still in progress. 

Joe Robertson, John Evans, 
Allen Evans, and Scott Repp have 
packed up and are now at their new 
residence on the corner of Jeffer- 
pi and Caspari. 

I Having eight bedrooms, the 
house can sleep sixteen members, 
phere are also three bathrooms; 
(one complete with three shower 
stalls , a kitchen , living room , study , 
|nd storage room. 
Hp Jonathan Tabor, an active 
Member of Kappa Sigma said, "It 
a mass of architectural genius 
others can only strive to 
fchieve." 

When asked how the house 
puld affect fallrush, the responses 
jtere positive. 

"The house will help at rush 
*6cause it is new and a central 
Meeting place, but we've always 
successful at rush without a 
£>use anyway," said Scott Repp, 
^appa Sigma alumnus. 
I Repp said, "We're proud to 
8? a part of the new fraternity row 



(as the first fraternity house), and 
are excited about making the house 
an attractive part of the NSU cam- 
pus." 

According to John Evans, Kappa 
Sigma social chairman, "The house 
at rush will show new people 
coming in how strong Kappa Sigma 
is, with not only its numerous 
members, but also with its new 
facilities." 

The new house can offer broth- 
ers and pledges major advantages. 
Allen Evans said, "Our new house 
will help immensely because it will 
cutdownon the expense of renting 
places for exchanges with sorori- 
ties and it will serve as a place 
where all of the members of Kappa 
Sigma can feel free to go and have 
fun or whatever." 

One other advantage of having a 
new house is the effect it will have 
on Kappa Sigma rush. Trey Duke, 
fall pledge trainer, feels, 'The new 
house will be a big plus for future 
rushes because it is at a great loca- 
tion on campus." 

Many alumni are excited 
about having aplace to come home 
to that is all theirs, unlike the 
Alumni Center, which members 
used as a meeting place for the past 
year and a half. 

There's alotofexcitementin 
the air, especially where Kappa 
Sigma Fraternity is concerned. 
They are all looking forward to a 
new school year in their new home. 




Kappa Sigma house 



"Don't call us, we'll call you." These infamous words didn't deter over 9,500 would-be actors and actresses as they waited in line 
at the A. A. Fredericks Creative and Performing Arts Center at the "Steel Magnolias" casting calls held June 16-18 and June 20. 



He studied music and English at 
UCLA and was a member of the New 
York City Ballet. Before spending the 
last 10 years casting, Dance did some 
acting and singing. 

He worked with such films as 
Being There, Back to School, Out on a 
Limb, Raging Bull and Smoky Moun- 
tain Christmas. 

Dance told applicants, "Every 



project is a beginning and I never take 
for granted my background. I always 
go back to the basics." 

Dance also said, "I'm good at 
what I do. I work hard; nobody works 
harder." 

He said the people he casts are 
not extras, but are "background art- 
ists." Dance said, "I like to term what 
I cast as a background artist. You are 



the breath that comes out of the film 
that does not speak." 

He feels his casting is like paint- 
ing. "I am an artist; I paint," Dance 
said, adding, "Art reflects life. It re- 
flects the madness. It reflects the 
confusion." 

Dance said his background art- 
ists should be real and should be them- 
selves. He eased a few nerves by 



saying, "I'm a real person, i have 
feelings; you have feelings." 

Dance pointed out that he has a 
certain bond with people he casts. He 
is drawn to them and that' s what makes 
him choose them. "No matter where 
I've been i n the world , we still touch ." 

"The people here have been so 
helpful to me and so loving," said 
Dance. 



NSU mar ma offers cool summer alternative 




By SONYA RIGAUD 
Editor 

Northwestern waterskiing buffs 
now have access to ski while using 
university facilities. The Northwest- 
ern marina located on Sibley Lake is 
now open for students to enjoy its 
recreational advantages. 

The marina was established by 
the Division of Leisure Activities and 
Recreational Sports and is open 
Monday-Wednesday 2 p.m. to 4:30 
p.m. 

Gene Newman, division direc- 
tor, said the marina facilitates two ski 
boats, along with sailboats, windsur- 
fers, canoes and paddleboats. 

Newman said WSI lifeguards 
will beon duty at all times. Workersat 
the marina include Dave Ferguson, 
Bill Friedman, Jack Jenkins, Jay 
Mount and Doug Sands. 

Newman said a van is available 
to bring students who do not have 
means of transportation. This van picks 
up students at Natchitoches Hall, 
which is the only residence hall open 
to Northwestern students this sum- 
mer. 

Van departure time Monday- 
Thursday is 1 p.m. from Natchitoches 
Hall to the Robert W. Wilson, Sr. 
Recreation Complex where students 
may swim in the Olympic-sized pool 
or play tennis or golf. Monday- 
Wednesday the van leaves at 2 p.m. 
for the marina on Sibley Lake. 

The van returns to Natchitoches 
Hall from Sibley Lake at 4:30 p.m. 
Monday- Wednesday and from North- 




Making a big splash, a Northwestern student enjoys the use of a skiboat offered by NSU's 
Division of Leisure Activities and Recreational Sports. The Division recently opened Sibley 
Lake to all students during the hours of 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Monday-Wednesday. 



western Recreation Complex at 5 p.m. 
Monday-Thursday. 

Newman said the marina was 
opened June 13. 

"This is part of the overall plan 
to get students involved," Newman 
said. 

According to Jay Mount, leisure 
activities worker, the marina should 
be open until September and students 
should take advantage of the opportu- 



nity. "It's there if they want it," Mount 
said. 

Newman also said the Intramu- 
ral Building is also open this summer 
and houses four racquetball courts 
and a game room complete with pool 
tables, ping pong, video games and a 
fooseball table. There are also many 
other varied activities available. The 
IM Building is open Monday-Thurs- 
day, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. and Friday, 8 a.m.- 



3 p.m. and is the only gymnasium 
available on campus at this time. 

The Canoe Shed on Chaplin's 
Lake also offers canoeing, sailing and 
paddleboating. The shed is open 
Monday-Thursday, 2:30-5:30 p.m. 
and Saturday and Sunday, 2:30-5:30 
p.m. 

Newman said, "Let's just enjoy 
ourselves. Let's enjoy what the sum- 
mer has to offer." 



Varnado project continues, fall completion nears 



By WANDA HAMILTON 
Staff Writer 

Varnado Hall, one of the oldest 
dormatories on Northwestern's cam- 
pus will reopen this fall. Northwestern 
began a major reconstruction process 
on Varnado Hall in March 1988 ac- 
cording to Loren Lindsey, physical 
plant director. 

In an attempt to recreate the 
original atmosphere of the dorm, most 
of the furniture, dating back tol939, 
will be refinished. Made of pecan 
wood, all pieces are considered an- 
tiques. 



The completion date has not 
been announced at this time. How- 
ever, Lindsey stated that there should 
be certain pieces of furniture and wings 
of Varnado Hall ready by August 10. 
Students will be able to occupy the 
hall on August 21. 

Residents will be upperclass- 
men although is has not been decided 
whether they will be male or female. 

Tours of Varnado Hall will be 
available after August 10. Those inter- 
ested should call Harold Boutte at 
357-6703, or Loren Lindsey at 357- 
5581. 




The interior of Varnado Hall 



Page 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



June 21 





Three Lady Demons 
capture Softball honors* 5 ?;"; 



By TOM WANCHO 
Contributor 

Northwestern State University 
Softball players Ginger Craig and 
SonjaOlsen were honored recently by 
the Louisiana Sports Writers Asso- 
ciation (LSWA) for their play last 
season. 

For the third consecutive year, 
Craig was named to the LSWA's first 
team as an outfielder. In the three year 
history of the LSWA team, only Craig 
and Louisiana Tech outfielder Chris 
Sherman have been first team choices 
each time out 

Craig earned this year's award 
based on her .443 slugging percentage 
and team-high 36 runs. The four year 
starter topped the Lady Demons in 
home runs for the fourth consecutive 
year and was also the squad leader in 



President discusses fall SGA plans 



11 Louisiana sports greats 
will be inducted into the Sports 
Hall of Fame 7 p.m. Saturday 
at Northwestern. Those being 
honored are (top from left) 
Terry Bradshaw, Willie Daven- 
port, Tommy Davis, Paul 
Dietzel, (second row) Lenny 
Fant, Elvin Hayes, Archie Man- 
ning, Rod Milburen, (third row) 
Greg Procell, Bill Reigel and 
J.R. Richard. Induction ceremo- 
nies will be held in the Fried- 
man Student Union Ballroom. 
Tickets are $15 for the banquet 
and induction ceremonies. For 
more information, contact the 
Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame. 



By KAREN ENGERON 

Staff Writer 

Micheal McHale, Student Gov- 
ernment Association President re- 
cently discussed higher education, 
economic effects on Northwestern and 
his future plans for campus improve- 
ment. 

"As we all know, higher educa- 
tion is in a critical stage right now. I 
have been spending quite a bit of time 
in Baton Rouge making sure the 
student's voice is heard and that the 
state does not forget about the small 
schools," said McHale. 

McHale said he urges all stu- 
dents to write their legislators in sup- 
port of higher education and as an 
investment for a better Louisiana fu- 
ture. 

Northwestern, which recently 
was in a state of financial exigency, 
has made all possible cuts from the 
university budget. Cutting any more 
would hinder the education of 
Northwestern's students, McHale said. 
"Louisiana Governor Buddy Roemer 
has made many budget cuts and 
changes within the system. I want to 
make sure Northwestern does not 
suffer any more cuts," McHale said. 

"Students in small schools 
should not have to suffer from the cuts 
because they can not afford the cost of 
a bigger school like Louisiana State 
University," McHale said. "All of the 
SGA presidents serve as representa- 
tives for students of their university, 
and we are doing our best for the 
students and their needs. We are 
coming together with the problems, 
hoping to find the solution." 

McHale is using the summer 
session to work with upcoming fall 
projects. According to McHale, 
Northwestern's SGA is currently 
composing a student telephone book. 
To cover costs, ads are being sold, 
freeing student fees for other pur- 
poses. 

McHale also has plans to secure 
an automatic bank teller on campus. 
He is currently negotiating with a bank 
in Natchitoches. In addition, a filing 
system for the new and old bills has 
been established. 

Commissioner of Elections 
Michael Mason and McHale have been 
setting dates for SGA elections in the 
fall semester. Commenting on 
Mason's work, McHale said, "He's 



doing a fine job. Getting the work 
done early will help us concentrate on 
other things in the fall semester." 

Fall 1988 elections include two 
senator positions from each class and 
a secretary. Appointed positions rang- 
ing from city governmental liaisons to 
homecomingcommitteechairmenwill 
also need to be filled. 

"Anyone who wants to get in- 
volved, SGA will find something for 
you to do; there is room for every- 
one," McHale said. 

In addition to the fall term elec- 
tions, McHale is hoping to make the 
State Fair Game a big rivalry. "I have 
things up my sleeve that will make 
Northeast rue the day they decided to 
play Northwestern at State Fair," 
McHale said. The 1988 season will be 
the first that Northwestern has not 
faced Louisiana Tech in the tradi- 
tional State Fair match. 

In the line of an eventful fall, 
McHale said he even has surprises for 
other fall football games. 

A SGA meeting will be held 7 
p.m. Tuesday, June 21 in room 222 of 
the Student Union. All students are 
encouraged to attend. 



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triples (five) and stolen bases (six). ft tS . V 
Olsen was named Freshman of.* 10 ^ 111111 

theYearaftercollecting45hits,aneWT a ' ce 
record for a first year player at North! Doesr 
western. The Lady Demon shormofWs smil 
for the next three years, Olsen leac -i t h ev 
Northwestern in hitting with a 21i 
average, striking out just six times ^ 
despite a team-high 164 trips to th^dOlymp 
plate. The native of San Diego, Calf.W? . . Reli 
hit safely in 31 of the 49 contests iiL, ce 
which she appeared with 14 of thosg 
games featuring multi-hit efforts. W 
Lady Demon third basemai/fi na ^y 8 
Tammy Mros was named honorablqe sitting 
mention by the LSWA. Mros, a juniotogll^ J (J 
college transfer from Sierra Vist^ Don't 
Ariz., was second among all player! 
in rbi's with 27 and compiled 37 hit}" 1 ™NAI 
to go along with a .257 batting aventO- But, n 
age. And d 

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CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 




EDITORIAL 



SONYA RIGAUD 
Wot 

"Take 76 — ACTION! " How many times are they going to film 

f)|*c 1* scene? 

o| If you were one of the thousands of would-be actors and 

ses presses who stampeded to the A.A. Fredericks Fine Arts Audito- 
eshman of" 01 ^ urin § °P en cas & n g calls, you may be lucky enough to hear 
hits,ane°wfak e 76 " or tetter yet, "Take 99." 

*atNorth-j Doesn't that sound simply marvelous, standing around for 
1 shons toa, u rs smiling that same fake smile over and over and over again 
^ufa they get " right • • • ? No ' U ' s Probably not that bad. 
■ six timea NoW what if y0U were the reason for escalating to "Take 99," 
trips to th^d Olympia Dukakis is giving you a go-to-hell stare for screwing 
iego, Calf -? . . . Relax, that's only her part. She may not stare, she might only 

efforts 1 And while y° u ' re waiting for your chance to shine, just think 
1 basemai/fi nall y § ettm § t0 rea£i y° ur favorite piece of Shakespeare all in 
I honorablie sitting for a change. "Will it really take that long?" you ask . . 
ros.ajuniofeil, I don't know, but it's probably not that boring. 

^piayw Don ' 1 for § et y° ur a PP le - You ma y starve to death by the time 
liled 37 hit ^ FINALLY get to eat (about six hours after you arrive on the 
atting avertt). But, hey, with all the excitement, who can eat ... ? 

And don't— I repeat— DON'T BE LATE! If your car breaks 
own, I hope you had your Wheaties. "I don't eat Wheaties," you 
I Well, honey, you'd better start. But don't worry, NOTHING 
going to happen to your car (I hope). 

Just imagine walking in with your head held high just thinking 
fall those great shots you're going to get to impress all of your 
I lends. HaHa, you thought you were going to be popular, . . . sorry, 
» cameras (or was that a gun you were going to get great shots 
ith?). 

Most importantly, do not ask anyone for autographs. That is, 
e director or principal actors. But that's okay, if I'm co-extra-ing 
ith you, you can ask for MY autograph. 

And at the end of the day when it is all over with, you finally 
:t your reward. Noooo, it's not a date with Daryl Hannah for all 
you sex-crazed thespians. It's a total of $50, but you may have 
stand in line like a bunch of desperate vagrants to get your money, 
h, well, money IS money. 



* 




Now from the producers of Bwana Devils ofCoushatta Comes a major motion picture £ 



The 



Can the Flying Nun's habit fit under a hair dryer? 



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See Shirley Machine return to Natchitoches 
as St. Denis in another life 



Watch as Daryl Hannah trades in her 
flippers and fins for peroxide and permrods 



Cheer as Tommy Whitehead gets a lesson from 
the pros in "How to manipulate rich people " 




That 



Natchitoches 



It wms m StiesE MmsvanpEMi! 



See Julia Roberts, whoever the hell she is 




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Needed: 
Writers for summer 
Current Sauce 
Contact: 

Steve Horton, Kyser 103, 357-5213 
or 

Sonya Rigaud, 357-5456 



Northwestern Nancy offers helpful advice 



»LISA DARDEN 
tiff Writer 

Dear Readers, 

Originally Ann Landers was 
sposed to write a special column for 
s addition of the Current Sauce. 
iwever, due to a hectic schedule and 
upcoming holiday, she was unable 
io so. The editor asked me to fill in. 

Giving it some thought, I solic- 
Iquestions from students at North- 
stem in order to complete the as- 
fiment. These were some of the 
re popular questions: 
Dear Nancy Northwestern, 
What happened to all the cheer- 
fers that usually swarm the campus 
ring the first three weeks of summer 
ool? Is the interest in cheering 
lining? If so, what's happening to 
American society? 

Sign me, Charley Missing 
»e Cheers. 
Dear Charley, 

Both the American society and 
Pleading are alive and doing well. 
: decline in camp enrollment can 
1y be explained. In the interest of 
Equality cheering, Northwestern 
"ehed from the NCA camp to the 



UCA camp. This switch, according to 
a Demon cheer — , I mean yell leader, 
was designed to offer a higher "qual- 
ity" camp. However, it seems that not 
all Louisiana high school cheerlead- 
ers know what's best for them. You 
can probably expect to see poor qual- 
ity cheering statewide this next year. 

And, while we're on the subject, 
I strongly urge you to stay inside'your 
dorm with the shades drawn as the 
cheerleaders walk to their practice 
sessions. Although the number of 
campers has declined, security has 
increased. In order to keep your name 
(and Northwestern's) clean, it is best 
that you don ' t even look at the campers. 
Nancy. 

Dear Nancy Northwestern, 

How can I make my $200 meal 
ticket last through the summer ses- 
sion? 

Hungry Harold. 

Dear Hungry Harold, 

Don't eat in the Student Union 
Cafeteria. Nancy. 

And another letter on that sub- 
ject 

Dear Nancy Northwestern, 
I knew the drought was serious, 



but 25 cents for a glass of water? And 
how can we warrant charging for a 
small glass of water when the campus 
sprinklers are going full fire? 

Confused Chad. 

Dear Confused, 

I suppose you're referring to the 
price of water in the cafeteria when 
you say 25 cents a cup. As most busi- 
ness majors know, the 25 cents is 
charged not for the water but for the 
cup — for inventory purposes. I sug- 
gest you carry your own cup to the 
cafeteria if you want free water with 
your meals (the straw is extra). 

And a gentle reminder: it is not 
the fault of the lady behind the counter 
or cash register. If you have a valid 
complaint, go to the manger. More 
than likely he' s in charge of prices and 
offerings. Nancy. 

Dear Nancy Northwestern, 

When I was in the third grade I 
played a little teapot in the school 
play. My mother said I was the best 
teapot she's ever seen. Although 1 
have grown and several years have 
passed, I still believe I'm qualified to 
play a major role in the movie being 
filmed in Natchitoches. What do you 
think my chances are? 



Gorgeous Gail, 
Dear Gail, 

It's too bad you're no longer 
short and stout It seems the script 
specifically called for a teapot in the 
kitchen scene. Better luck next time. 
Nancy. 

Dear Nancy Northwestern, 

When is Itza Pizza open for 
Northwestern students? 

Pepperoni Patty. 

Dear Pepperoni, 

Oooooh ! That' s a tough one. I ' m 
not for sure of the real hours but I 
know your chances of getting a pizza 
are much higher when there is a camp 
on campus. Nancy. 

Dear Nancy Northwestern, 

Is Mark Russo really a cab driver 
from the Bronx? 

Sign me, Wanna Know. 

Dear Wanna, 

Where y'at? Listen to him talk 
and you be the judge. Nancy. 

Dear Nancy Northwestern, 

Are you a real person? 

Just Wondering. 

Dear Wondering, 

Shouldn't you be more con- 
cerned with the theory of evolution or 
your math homework? Nancy. 



Write a letter to the editor 




— . 



— 



Current Sauce 



The Current Sauce's published weekly during the 
follandspringsemestersbythestudentsofNorthwest- 
Sr A State University of Louisiana. It is not associated 
^ith any of the University's departments and is fi- 
^nced independently, 

The Current Sauce is based ri the Office of 
Student Publications located in Kyser Hall. The office 
?f the editorid staff is 225H, telephone (3 1 8) 357^5456. 
?te adviser's office is 103 Kyser Hall, telephone 357- 
s 2l3. 

The mailing address for the Current Saucels P.O. 
5306, NSU, Natchitoches, LA 71497. 

1 All correspondence, including letters to the edi- 
° r is welcome. Material submitted for consideration 
^Jst be mailed to the above address or brought to 
"ta office. 

The deadline for all advertisement and copy is 3 
^•rn. each Friday. Inclusion of any and all material Is 
to the discretion of the editor. 
Letters to the editor should be typed (double- 
JpQced), signed and should 'nclude a telephone 
jjurnber where the writer can be reached. No anony- 
ms letters will be printed. 

Current Sauce subscription rates are $ 1 1 per 
? c ademic year (28 issues) or $6 per semester (14 
t? u ®s). The paper is entered as second-class mail at 



Qtchitoches. LA. The USPS number is 140-660. 



LISA DARDEN 
H. SCOTT JOLLEY 



SONYA RIGAUD 
Editor 

KAREN ENGERON 
CONNIE LEDOUX 
Staff Writers 

ALLEN EVANS 
Advertising Manager 



DAN DUPRE JOE ROBERTSON 
Photographers 

DAMIAN DOMINIQUE 
Cartoonist 

EDD LEE 
Circulation/Distribution 

STEVE HORTON 
Graduate Adviser 

TOM WHITEHEAD 
Adviser 



DAYNA DOOLEY 
WANDA HAMILTON 



Summer '88 



Current Quotes 



Do you think the food in the 
Student Union cafeteria is 
worth the price? 




Iliiisiil 





Charlotte Rush, 3-2 
Natchitoches 



Jennifer Bridges, 1-1 
Alexandria 



"No, the food is not worth the "The price of the food is too 

price. It is definitely cheaper to eat much. By the middle of July, no- 

in town or even go home and cook body will have any money to eat 

lunch." anyway." 






Tanya Stevens, 1-2 
Coushatta 

'Wo, / don't think the food is 
worth the price is costs. To get a 
refill of Coke costs the same prior 
as the Coke. The food is good but 
it's too high and for the amount of 
food they give you, the price isn't 
worth eating in the cafeteria." 



Michael Mason, 4-3 
Shreveport 



"The food in the Union is far 
too high when the quality is not that 
good. Students here should not 
have to pay for the same food two 
times a week, either. The variety 
should be upgraded and the prices 
should be lowered. It would seem 
as if the salaries for the ARA people 
were coming straight from the prices 
we pay to eat the meals." 





Frederick Perkins, 2-1 
Pineville 

"I think the food could defi- 
nitely stand some improvement. The 
prices, however, are ridiculous. 
They even charge 25( for water!" 



Scott Repp, 4-2 
Natchitoches 

"Yes. The prices here are 
comparable to most fast food places 
taking both quantity and quality 
into consideration." 



Page 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



June 21, 19qj 




Plantation homes provide 
"true history" of the South 



By CONNIE LEDOUX 
Staff Writer 

The plantation homes bordering 
the Natchitoches area are more than 
scenes from "Gone With The Wind" 
according to Barbara Bacot, architec- 
tural historian. 

"We want people to have a real- 
istic education about homes in the 
south, not a Tara education from 
Warner Brothers. People need to be 
educated by true history," Bacot said. 

Bacot is one of several preser- 
vationists attending a first time, three 
week seminar at Northwestern. The 
course is offered through the Louisi- 
ana Folklife Center and features ex- 
pert lecturers talking about the topics 
they know best 

Students are hearing from teach- 
ers not only about how old the build- 
ings are and their architectural influ- 
ences, but about the literature being 
written during the time of construc- 
tion and the philosophy held by the 
owners of plantations across the south . 

Lectures are held in the morning 
and on site applications are done in 
the afternoons. Students are digging 
in the ground, inspecting the planta- 
tions for decay, and studying the de- 
signs of plantation homes in the area. 
A focus is being paid to Magnolia 
Plantation where several buildings 
beyond the main house are still in tact. 
Students are searching through old 
slave quarters, inspecting blacksmith 
shops, and even still standing barns of 
a hundred years ago. 

Step by step, Dr. Donald Hatley, 
director of the Louisiana Folklife 
Center, is following the progress of 
his newly acquired seminar course. 

"The students are learning what 
to look for when they visit plantation 
homes. Instead of just seeing a beau- 
tiful home, they are noticing the black 
spots on the ground where old cook- 
ing fires used to burn," Hatley said. 

The architectural desgins of the 
plantation homes are studied from top 
to bottom. Lecturing to students this 
week is Maximillian Ferro. His spe- 



cialty is the wood, brick, and stone of 
yesterday. On site he's pointing out 
the foundations of the buildings, not- 
ing which ones have lasted longer and 
which ones were not built to last 

"Right here in this area, you 
have a very rare home built in the sty le 
of greek temples. Four logs are placed 
upright in the ground, aroof is added, 
and then the sides are constructed. It 
was built by the French and there are 
only five in the country still in tact. 
You have one of them," Ferro said. 

"Partof having apreserved home 
worth preserving is being proud of 
what you have. If the community is 
educated at the artifacts surrounding 
them, then they can become your 
greatest sales people. Hasn't some- 
one ever told you, 'you've just gotta 
see this place...' Well, what do you 
do? You go and visit," Ferro said. 

The three week seminar, which 
is filled with students who want to one 
day be Historical Preservationists 
themselves, is made possible by the 
Office of Cultural Development. 
Through efforts by Bacot and Hatley, 
a proposal for the course caught 
enough attention to raise federal fund- 
ing. 

"The future is where we come 
from. If we don't connect with our 
past, we will never understand why 
we do what we do. It's important for 
people to know and understand all of 
what they are seeing when they look at 
the homes of their ancestors and heri- 
tage." Bacot said. 



Sports honors announced 

NSU Tracksters named to 
LWSA Track and Field team 



By TOM WANCHO 
Contributor 

Seven individual men, two male 
relay teams and four individual women 
have been named to the 1988 Louisi- 
ana Sports Writers Association 
(LWSA) Track and Field team. 

Speedy Al Edwards, whose 
10.39effortinthe 100 meter dash was 
the third best in the state this year, 
made the team in that event and as part 
of Northwestern 's 400 meter relay 
team. Other quarter mile relay mem- 
bers include Kenneth DeWitt, Edgar 
Cooper and Chester Davis. 

Northwestern ' s mile relay four- 
some, composed of Tommy Thomas, 
Lawrence Chatman, Ronald Wilkins 
and Charles Woods had the fifth fast- 
est time in the state this year after a 
3:09.75 clocking to gain all-state 
status. 

Freshman Gerard Semien was 
named to the team in the 10,000 meter 
run and junior Jamie Hom, who came 
close to qualifying for the NCAA's in 
the 1 10 meter hurdles, earned a spot 
on the team with his 1 3.88 time in that 
event 

All- Americas Llewellyn Starks 
and Brian Brown were shoe-ins for 
the squad. Starks finished third in this 
year's NCAA outdoor meet with a 
school record jump of 26-7 3/4 . Brown 
took home sixth place nationally with 
a 7-3 3/4 high jump. 

Discus thrower Paul Oenbrink 



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for a final mark of 176-0, the fourth 
best mark in Louisiana. Pole vaulter 
Richard Whitaker earned his LSWA 
certificate with the state's fifth best 
vault of 1988. 

Yetta James made two appear- 
ances on the women's best perform- 
ance list. The sophomore from Natchi- 
toches had a fourth best 13.80 in the 
100 meterhurdlesandher4.452 points 
in the heptathlon represented the sec- 
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this year. 

High jumper Sonja Dale and 
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distance in the state after her heave of 
45-4 1/4. 



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JSA DAI 
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Northw( 
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Located 
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Waskorr 
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ook list ii 
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b? 8g0ner 
^onteam 

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* 1982. 







JULY 5, 1988 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 
OF LOUISIANA 



VOL 77, NO. 3 



fat's Economy offers students alternative in book sales 



I LISA DARDEN 
Writer 

Northwestern students buying 
ooks this fall will have a choice, 
aits can choose to purchase text- 
s from either the University 
Store or Pat's Economy Store. 

Located on College Avenue 
ss from Watson Library, Pat's 
iomy will enter the college text- 
3 business in August, according to 
Waskom, part owner and man- 



rs 



Waskom said he will offer 
listed on the official university 
ook list in the fall. "We will 
e books directly from pub- 
or wholesalers, a standard 
jce," Waskom said. 
Waskom said he believes the 
petition will help Northwestern 
sots. "It will definitely be benefi- 
the students. Our competition 
icquire Wallace's to serve stu- 
better," Waskom said. "I will 



have to keep an edge on Wallace's in 
order to attract students." Pat's Econ- 
omy intends to have better prices foi 
students in most cases and compa- 
rable prices in others, according to 
Waskom. 

Waskom said he became inter- 
ested in Northwestern 's textbook 
business when he was approached by 
Current Sauce editor Greg Kendrick 
andStudentGovernment Association 
(SGA) representative Michael 
McHale last spring. Kendrick and 
McHale expressed an interest in of- 
fering students an alternative to the 
University Bookstore. 

"The reason I got in it (college 
textbook business) in the first place 
was in answering the student call," 
Waskom said. 

Kendrick said he became inter- 
ested in the bookstore issue after the 
appearance of a petition on campus. 
Co-authored by Byron McKinney. 
junior sociology major from Logans- 
port, and Brian Durnell, junior jour- 



nalism major from Fort Wayne, Ind., 
the petition first appeared on campus 
during registration of the 1988 spring 
term. 

Dated Dec. 16, 1987, and ad- 
dressed to President Robert Alost, the 
petition stated, "We feel that the 
bookstore, under the management of 
Wallace Bookstore (sic), has been 
unfair to the students in its book return 
policy. The bookstore seems to have 
very little interest in how the students 
are treated. Most of the books are very 
expensive and some students have 
received as little as 10 percent of theii 
cost upon return. Many of the books 
are only used for a short time and the 
same book you paid full amount foi 
only four months before now has nc 
value. However there is no list of 
books that will not be bought back anc 
students loss (sic) valuble (sic) study 
time waiting in lines to find out they 
cannot sell back their books. We real- 
ize you are very busy, but if you could 
just look into this matter students as a 



whole would benefit. Thank you foi 

your time." 

McKinney and Durnell set a 
goal of 1,000 signatures and planned 
to submit the petition and signatures 
to Alost and Dr. James Haley, vice 
president of Student Affairs, by the 
end of the semester. According to 
Haley, no petition had been submitted 
to his office by June 30. 

Of the complaints listed in the 
petition, the University Bookstore 
solved the issue of providing a list of 
books being purchased back from 
students. The list was made available 
during the spring 1988 buy back ses- 
sion due to computer system installed 
by Wallace's Bookstores, Inc. 

Wallace's began leasing the 
University Bookstore from Northwest- 
ern on Aug. 1, 1987. Since the lease 
agreement began, Wallace's has in- 
stalled not only a computer system but 
has also renovated the store and up- 
dated merchandise selection. 

Darlene Rachal, director of 



Northwestern 's University Bookstore 
for 16 years, addressed other petition 
issues in a Feb. 2, 1988, edition of the 
Current Sauce. In the issue, Rachal 
explained buy back and wholesale 
pricing procedures. 

Despite student complaints, 
Waskom said Northwestern was at 
first reluctant to cooperate with him in 
establishing a textbook competitor for 
the University Bookstore. Waskom 
said when he requested the textbook 
list he met some resistance. "I con- 
tacted the Board of Trustees, who 
contacted the State Attorney General." 
Eventually the Board of Trustees made 
the decision allowing Waskom to have 
access to the textbook list and to sell 
and buy back books to Northwestern 
students. Alost had also contacted the 
State Attorney's Office. 

Despite delays, Pat' s Economy 
was purchasing used books from stu- 
dents prior to receiving the textbook 
list. The list was made available to 
Waskom on May 22. 



Of his first buy back, Waskom 
said: "We did very well. We had a 
better tharl expected response." Wa- 
skom, however, declined to release 
the number of books purchased from 
students. 

Rachal said of the University 
Bookstore spring buy back session: 
"For the record, since I have been 
manager of the University Bookstore, 
spring 1988 wasourlargestbuy-back." 

For expected sales of the fall 
1988 term, Rachal said: "Atthis point, 
it would be premature for me to make 
a statement regarding fall rush since I 
am not familiar with any of the details 
of the textbook operation of Pat's 
Economy Store." 

Rachal did say, however, that 
merchandise sales have been good 
throughout the summer semester.. 

Waskom said in the future he 
hopes the two stores will be able to 
work together in providing the best 
service for the students of Northwest- 
ern. 




rts, 
mil, 
Idren 



or 

goals 



Starks 




Brown 



Waggoner dismissed due 
o administrative decision 




Belt) 





its 
ait 
i) 



MICHELLE WEEGO 
vributor 

Northwestern State University athletic officials confirmed last 
fey that assistant basketball coach Wayne Waggoner will not have his 
«« renewed for the 1988-89 fiscal year. 

The Northwestern administration gave no official reason for 
Oner's dismissal but claimed it was an administrative decision. 

Waggoner, who has served six years with Northwestern said offi- 
ce him no reason for the decision. Waggoner also stated that he was 
'told his performance was poor during his years with the Demon 

Head coach Don Beasley expressed surprise at the announcement 
•8ft another official claimed Beasley was present during the meeting 
Hie decision was made. 

ferry Pierce, Northwestem's athletic department's executive assis- 
tive president explained that all members must be reviewed by the 
tion in order for contracts to be renewed. He stated that the 
^native decision was to dismiss Waggoner. 
|Botn Pierce and Tynes Hildebrand, Northwestem's Athletic Direc- 
ed to comment on the reason for Waggoner's dismissal. Sympa- 
with Waggoner, Beasley said he had no part in the decision saying 
, a 8goner had been an asset to the team. 
, Be asley pointed out that since Waggoner's arrival in 1982, the 
P^econ! improved from 3-25 in 1984-85 to last season's 6-12. In 
Beasley said Waggoner was a major factor in the improved 
!^ ent program at Northwestern. Beasley became head coach after 
"5-86 season. 

u t according to Pierce, Beasley was in the meeting when this 
n fo r Waggoner's dismissal was reached. 
)*nfused by the decision, Waggoner commented that he was never 
J*ut anything he had done wrong. He later stated that he thought he 
Jto things a good assistant would do and could not understand why 
* ^ e stern would take such actions, 
^hough Beasley said he did not know the reason of Waggoner's 
dismissal, he refused to divulge what information he did know 
e decision. He later stated that no one would get the answer to why 
■sion was made. 

'toebrand also refused comment saying he was not sure how to 
^ne questions concerning this decision. 

a 8goner, 28, is a native of Logansport. He played basketball with 
" °n team for two years following the tradition of his father. Bernard 
.^rplayedatNorthwestern during the late 1940's and early 1950's. 

er Waggoner was later selected to the prestigious Graduate 'N' 

m i 982 



Demon jumpers compete in Olympic trials 



By TOM WANCHO 
Contributor 

The moment of truth has arrived 
for Northwestern State University's 
pair of Olympic hopefuls, high jumper 
Brian Brown and long jumper Lle- 
wellyn Starks. 

Brown and Starks will be in In- 
dianapolis, Indiana from Friday, July 
15 through Monday, July ^.compet- 
ing at the United States Olympic Track 



and Field trials. The two jumpers hope 
to earn a spot on the 1988 US Olympic 
team. 

Brown, the Demons school rec- 
ord holder in the high jump, opens the 
qvnlifying round on July 15 while 
Starks gets his first shot at qualifying 
on Sunday. If he makes it past the first 
round, Brown will jump on Saturday 
and Starks, provided he makes it past 
the first round, will jump in Sunday's 
finals. 



The top three in each event 
qualify for the Olympics. The Olym- 
pics are to be held this fall in Seoul, 
Korea. 

Both Starks and Brown have 
achieved all-America status in their 
respective events. 

Starks, one of the nation's pre- 
mier long jumpers, finished third in 
the nation at last month's NCAA 
Outdoor Track and Field Champion- 
ships and has been fifth in the nation 
during the indoor championships each 



of the last two years, bringing un- 
precedented recognition to the North- 
western State University track pro- 
gram. 

Brown is just about in the same 
boat, winning all-America honors 
three times, including two in the out- 
door season and once during last 
March indoors. Bothered by a 
calloused heel most of the outdoor 
season, Brown competed in Indian- 
apolis this past weekend as a warmup 
to the Olympic Trials next week. 



Greek rush begins a week early to avoid conflicts 



By DAYNA DOOLEY 
StaffWriter 

Greek Rush at Northwestern 
State University will begin Thursday, 
August 18 and will continue through 
Tuesday, August 23. Rush is being 
held a week earlier than usual this fall, 
due to the request of the Northwestern 
administration. 

About administration discus- 
sions, Fred Fulton, director of Student 
Life, said "We felt it was in the best 
interest long term, to have rush sev- 
eral days earlier before all students 
were on campus, so rush activities and 
campus activities would not conflict" 

Fulton also stated, "The admini- 
stration felt we could give more assis- 
tance to fraternities and sororities 
during rush, if rush was earlier." 

Two major reasons for holding 
rush earlier are because larger univer- 
sities were scheduling rush earlier, 
and rush conflicted with 
Northwestem's annual Welcome 



Week. Thus, students participating in 
rush would not attend some Welcome 
Week activities planned by student 
organizations. 

Benefits for Greeks, as well as 
rushees, include the following: Greeks 
would have the entire campus to them- 
selves, rush would not have to com- 
pete with other organizations and 
workshops and more rushees could 
participate in rush, even if they are 
involved in band, danceline or cheer- 
leading. 

Two large organizations whose 
schedules often coincide with rush are 
the "Spirit of Northwestern" Demon 
Marching Band and the Louisiana 
Scholars' College. 

The music department con- 
firmed the only events they have 
planned during rush week are a sec- 
tion leader camp Thursday, August 

18 at 8 a.m. and a "get together" for 
incoming freshmen Friday, August 

19 at 6 p.m. 



director of the Scholars ' College, said, 
"The Scholars' College is trying to 
work out a series of activities that will 
not conflict with Greek rush. How- 
ever, we will not have anything defi- 
nite planned until after July 6. At this 
time, Kim Johnson, the administra- 
tive assistant, will announce events 
planned for the Scholars' College." 

One event that might coincide 
with rush would be the recognition 
ceremony for the Scholars' College 
freshman class. The date of this event 
is totally dependent on Governor 
Buddy Roemer, who is to conduct the 
ceremony. 

Sorority rush consists of basi- 
cally four parties. Friday, Aug. 19, at 
2 p.m. are the open house parties. 
Mini-theme parties are Saturday, Aug. 
20 at 2 p.m., major theme parties are 
Sunday, Aug. 21, at 2 p.m. and Mon- 
day, Aug. 22 at 7 p.m. are preferential 
tea parties. Tuesday, Aug. 23, rushees 
will pick up their bids at noon. 



Fraternity rush consists of night- 
time parties which will again be dry 
this year. 

Panhellenic, who governs the 
sororities, send out a brochure on rush 
the second week in June. Another 
brochure will follow when more names 
are received as potential rushees. 

Reatha Cole, Panhellenic advi- 
sor said, 'This year's Panhellenic is 
making many new changes. We have 
been updating information on the 
brochures for rush, Panhellenic will 
go to the University Day at Pierre 
Bossier Mall to set up a display pro- 
moting rush, and we are having a 
Panhellenic pledging to promote 
Greek unity." 

"In the past, rushees after pick- 
ing up their bids had to walk to the 
sorority house they had pledged, which 
could be very intimidating to the 
rushees. This year, after Panhellenic 
pledging, a few girls from each soror- 
ity house will bring their new girls up 
to their respective houses." 



Magnolias take root in Natchitoches 







Julia Roberts, Olympia Dukakis, Dolly Parton, Shirley MacLaine, Sally Field, and Daryl 
Hannah pose for the press at the conference held on June 28 . (photo by H. Scott Jolley) 



The Current Sauce staff 
feels that it is important that the 
students of Northwestern and the 
people of Natchitoches realize the 
significance that the past experi- 
ences of the actresses, producer, 
director and screenwriter have 
on the outcome of the production 
of Steel Magnolias. The great 
amount of hard work and dedica- 
tion of each person involved will 
stand to make Steel Magnolias a 
success in the movie industry. 
Pages 2 and 3 contain an indep Ji 
account of the background of each 
actress, the producer, the director 
and the screenwriter. 




PAGE 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



JULY 5, 1988 



FEATURE 

















"Hi, y'all!" Steel Magnolias meet press at NSU 



By SONYA RIGAUD 
Editor 

"Howdy! We're all so proud to be here! ," exclaimed Dolly Parton at the 
Steel Magnolias press conference last Tuesday which was held at Northwest- 
ern State University's Student Union Ballroom. 

Jerry Pierce of the News Bureau started off the conference by welcoming 
the stars and saying how proud the people of Natchitoches and Northwestern 
are to have the cast and crew of Steel Magnolias here. 

Along with Parton were the other five actresses to star in Steel Magnolias: 
Olympia Dukakis, Sally Field, Daryl Hannah, Shirley Maclaine and Julia 
Roberts. Producer Ray Stark and Director HerbertRoss were also available for 
comments. 

Along with approximately 100 members of the local and statewide press 
(including the Califomia-basedZs/ifertam/ranf Tonight), several local dignitar- 
ies were present "Boy, I didn't have this many people at my last concert," 
kidded Parton. 

Steel Magnolias author Robert Harling, his parents, Lt.Gov. Paul Hardy, 
who heads the Office of Film and Video, and Tesa Laviolette, executive 
director, were also present. 

When Stark was asked why he chose to use Natchitoches at the film 's site, 
he laughed and said, "There's no place but Louisiana to make a hot picture." 

Adding to his thoughts, Field said, "I wish it would cool down just a touch. 
It will break, won't it? Tell me it will." The answer to this was "Not until 
December." 

Parton said she warned the others about the weather, but they wouldn't 
listen. "I'm glad they didn't," she said. 

When the group of stars was asked if they had any superstitions coricem- 
ing the start of a new film, all answered "no" except for Stark: 'To stay on 
budget!" he said emphatically. 

Announcing that she had already found out that everyone in Natchitoches 
knew everyone else's business, Maclaine said, "so from now on, I'm keeping 
my mouth shut." 

Hannah, who brought her dog with her to the press conference, said she 
has been horseback riding and she can't wait to see an alligator. 

Roberts, the newcomer of the group, looks up highly to her fellow 
workers. "It doesn't get any better than this," said Roberts. 

Since both the setting and roles of Steel Magnolias are Southern, the 
actresses were asked to give examples of Southern accents. Hannah startedoff 
the group with a shy "Hi, y'all." 

"You don't need to ask me that question, just pass me by," said Parton as 
Dukakis eased back with her plantation Southern drawl. "'Peel me a pear' is 
my favorite Southern saying," remarked Dukakis. 

Director Ross said, "We not only have wonderful actresses, but wonder- 
ful actresses for these parts." 

Dukakis was attracted to the movie by the courage in Harling 's play and 
said she will try to work around her schedule to help in the campaign for 
presidential candidate Michael Dukakis, her cousin. "I plan to go to take off 
from the set for two days to go to Atlanta to the Democratic Convention." 

' Field said she was attracted to the movie by the chance of working with 
director Ross. She signed without knowing who the other five would be. 

"I got fired from ABC, so I took the part," Parton joked. Afterwards, she 
said that she had decided to join the Steel Magnolias cast before her variety 
show was cancelled. 

Maclaine said she likes the way Harling takes the characters to the edge 
of caricature, but never crosses the line. 

"The play is rare in that it is so well written," said Hannah. 

Stark said, "The truth of this film is embedded in Natchitoches, thepeople, 
the events and the town. Robert Harling grew up in and was nurtured by 
Natchitoches. That makes it work for us." S tark announced that a documentary 
on the filming would be put together with Harling acting as narrator. 

When asked if he had a release date and if he had plans for a premiere near 
Natchitoches, Stark said, "Yes, to both questions." 



Roberts proud of role 



Julia Roberts, who plays 
Shelby , theill-fated daughter, began 
her career in regional theater, ap- 
pearing onstage with the Atlanta 
Repertory Theater, playing Emily in 
Our Town and Cecily in The Impor- 
tance Of Being Earnest. 

Her screen roles included lood 
Red and Satisfaction and the 



"It doesn't get any better 
than this," says Julia 
Roberts of the prestigious 
company she keeps in 
Steel Magnolias. 



upcoming Mystic Pizza. She has 
appeared on television as the epi- 
sodic lead in NBC's Crime Story and 
inRastar' sBaja Oklahoma for HBO, 
appearing with Leslie Ann Warren 
and Peter Coyote. 

Baja Oklahoma is now avail- 
able for rental at The Movie Store in 
Pat's Ecomony on College Avenue. 




FEZ 







Stars deal with life, death, marriage in "Magnolias" 



Steel Magnolias, which centers around six women in a small 
southern town, who come to terms with life, death and marriage, is being 
filmed as a Rastar Production for Tri-Star Pictures release, starring Sally 
Field, Dolly Parton, Shirley MacLaine, Daryl Hannah, Olympia Dukakis 
and Julia Roberts. 

HerbertRoss is directing with Ray S tark producing. The film will be 
shot in its entirety on locations in and around Natchitoches where the story 
is set. The film is based on the hit Off-Broadway play by Robert Harling, 
who also wrote the screenplay. 

Victoria White is executive producer and Andy Stone, Associate 
Producer. The director of cinematography is James Glennon, Paul Hirsch 
is editor and Dean O'Brien is Production Manager. 

When the play opened in New York in 1987, critics were unanimous 
in lauding the diversity of the women characters, the feeling of the com- 
munity, and the easy acceptance of the varying social groups. 

While the story is an ensemble piece the drama bounces off the young 
Shelby, who is soon to be married, the crisis that follows the marriage and 
the gathering together of the wdmen to deal with an irreversible tragedy. 



Field will play M'Lynn, who must confront the illness of her daugh- 
ter, Shelby, to be played by Roberts. Parton, as Truvy, presides over the 
beauty parlor where the women gather; MacLaine is the acerbic neighbor 
Ouiser, Hannah is Annelle, the young woman who comes to apprentice at 
the beauty shop and Dukakis is cast as Clairee, the late mayor's wife. 

Director Ross and Producer Stark have teamed in seven previous 
films, all highly successful, including last year's box office hit, The Secret 
of My Success, starring Michael J. Fox. Others include Funny Lady, 
Sunshine Boys, Goodbye Girl, California Suite, Owl And The Pussycat, 
and Funny Girl, in which Ross directed the musical numbers only. 

The production is renting the gymnasium on the campus of Natchi- 
toches' Northwestern Stale University for its interiors, building its sets 
there. 

Production is set to start July 12, running through Sept 15. The prin- 
cipal actors and staff have already arrived in Natchitoches for rehearsals 
prior to production. There was an earlier week of rehearsals in Los Ange- 
les. 

Many extras will be recruited from the area for crowd scenes. 



"Bobby 
I edge of 

Magnolias begin to bloom: Julia Roberts, Olympia Dukakis, Dolly Parton, Shirley MacLaine, Sally Field, and Daryl MacLaii 
Hannah stand in front of the movie's logo during the Steel Magnolias press conference. 

Sta 
ref 

Ray 
ducer slice 
and persoi 
sense of si 
is his eight 
Ross, and 
films with 
Barbara S 
Gleason, f 
three with 
Stark 
tremely su 
ring Matth 
lows Stark 
Secret Of 
chael J. Fc 
Ross. Am 
films are , 
starring Ka 
In Commoi 
Jackie Glei 
His p 
Funny Gir 

Heartbreaker, among others. Were, The 
Her occasional teaming m&Electric H 
Kenny Rogers have provided a num-The Bandit 
ber of hit television specials and all Ray 5 
bums, including the album and TVieflect cari 
show, Once Upon A Christmas. Anjjelationshi] 
other award winner was her teaminjjihat Stark \ 
for Trio, with Linda Ronstadt awiheAcaden 
Emmylou Harris, which won 1988|nd Scienc 
Grammy and Country Music AssoUward for 
ciation honors. Her most recent album jj films 
was Rainbow as the start of her new Stark 
CBS Records contract ture produc 

Parton is the guiding force bej 
hind Dollywood, an 87-acre them* *•» 
park that combines Dolly's artistry i~J 
with her interest in preserving hei 
Smokey Mountain heritage and Easl 
Tennessee lifestyle. 

Parton has many homes located 
in such places as Hawaii, Holly woodi 
New York and Nashville where sh< 
lives with her husband of 22 years 
Nashville businessman Carl Dean. 



Parton faces most dramatic effort 




"We're all so proud to be 
here!" says Dolly Parton to 
the crowd at the NSU press 
conference. Steel Magnolias 
will be the actress/country 
singer's fourth movie. 



Dolly Parton, who plays Truvy, 
the operator of the beauty parlor, is 
taking on her most dramatic effort yet, 
but she has faced a career of chal- 
lenges, starting with that classic story 
of being bom to a struggling farm 
family of 12, and singing her way to 
stardom. 

When, as a major star in country 
music, she moved to Los Angeles, she 
was accused of leaving her roots 
behind. Her scrappy answer was not 
so-she was taking them with her. 
And she did, cutting a swath through 
television, concerts, Las Vegas and 
ultimately, motion pictures. And along 
with her went the country charm and 
honesty that shines through all of her 
work which makes her as successful 
as she is today 

She went on to star in three 
motion pictures: 9 to 5, with Jane 
Fonda and Lily Tomlin; Best Little 
Whorehouse In Texas, with Burt 



Reynolds and Rhinestone, with 
Sylvester Stallone. 

Her career is studded with 
awards, winning four Grammys, 
honored seven times by the Country 
Music Association in various catego- 
ries, such as Entertainer of the Year 
and Female Vocalist of the Year, and 
winner of an Academy Award nomi- 
nation for her title tune of 9 to 5. That 
film brought honors from a variety of 
groups, such as Golden Globes nomi- 
nations in three categories: Best Song, 
Best New Film S tar and Best Support- 
ing Actress. 

Born in Locust Ridge, Tennes- 
see, she first found stardom in country 
music, teaming with Porter Waggoner 
in concerts, television and recordings. 
She left Waggoner for Los Angeles in 
1974 where her career moved into 
high gear, with a number of RCA 
albums that struck gold and platinum , 
including Here You Come Again and 




M'Lynn played by actress with southern experience 

Field returns to cinematic south 



"it 

the 
off 



Sally Field will play M'Lynn, 
the mother forced to confront the ill- 
ness of her daughter, S helby , in a role 
that returns her to the cinematic south 
of such past screen triumphs for her in 
Places In The Heart and Norma Roe. 
In both instances she won Best Ac- 
tress Academy Awards. 

In Steel Magnolias Field moves 
to a different period and social strata, 
playing a contemporary uppermiddle- 
class housewife in a small southern 
town. The dramatic conflict here lies 
within relationships, rather than so- 
ciological conditions. 

Field will be seen this summer 
in ColumbiaPictures' Punchline, with 
will break, won't it? Tell me it will." asks Sally Field about Tom Hanks, with Field playing a 

heat. Whenshewastold"NotuntilDecember,"shecooled housewife and mother who decides to 
, . . . . . , . ' , . pursue her dream of being a stand-up 

by taking a big drink of water to quench her thirst. comic _ h was a film ^ ma(Je for her 



own production company, Fogwood 
Films, which also produced Murphy' s 
Romance, with Field and James Gar- 
ner. 

In addition to winning Oscars 
and other awards for her portrayals in 
Robert B enton ' s Places In The Heart 
and Martin Ritt's Norma Rae, herrole 
of the young schizophrenic in the four- 
hour television special Sybil yielded 
an Emmy. 

Field was born in Pasadena, 
California, to a show business family, 
and acting has been a part of her entire 
life. Her mother, Maggie Field Ma- 
honey, had been under contract at 
Paramount Pictures, and her stepfa- 
ther, Jock Mahoney, starred in televi- 
sion westerns and Tarzan films. While 
enrolled in acting classes at Columbia 
Studios she was picked over 150 fi- 



nalists to star in the TV series, Gidget. 

Field went on to become a big 
television star with her subsequent 
roles as The Flying Nun and The Girl 
With Something Extra. 

Eventually, she moved into 
motion pictures with Bob Rafelson's 
Stay Hungry, which also starred Jeff 
Bridges and Arnold Schwarzenegger. 

Her next project was the Emmy 
Award-winning Sybil, where she 
portrayed a mentally disturbed woman 
with multiple personalities. Joanne 
Woodward also starred in the pro- 
gram that marked a turning point in 
Field's career. 

From there she took a dramatic 
break and played comic roles oppo- 
site Burt Reynolds in Smokey AndThe 
Bandit, I and II, Hooper and The End. 
In between were Heroes, co-starring 



Henry Winkler, and Norma Rae, f<| 
which Field won her first Oscar- I 

After starring in Back Roadl 
Absence of Malice and Kiss Me Godi 
dbye, Field went on to win her seconj 
Oscar for Places In The Heart. H«J 
most recent films include Murphy J 
Romance with James Garner and Sun 
render with Michael Caine and Stevj 
Guttenberg. 

Field lives in Los Angeles will 
her husband, Alan Greisman (wM 
produced Fletch), and her three son! , 




All 

Steel Magnolias 

photos by 
H. Scott Jolley 



it 



ivebee 
i^ho broi 



I 



JULY 5, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 3 



— 



FEATURE 



MacLaine plans to write book while here 




id Daryl 



Shirley MacLaine, who plays 
acerbic Ouiser, is renowned as an 
actress, a singer, a dancer and an au- 
thor whose sixth book will be pub- 
lished this fall by Bantam. 

Winning the 1983 Academy 
Award for Best Actress in Terms Of 
Endearment culminated five nomina- 
tions as Best Actress for Shirley, who 
was previously nominated for her 
performances in Some Came Running 
WB (1958), The Apartment (1960), Irma 
La Douce (1963), and The Turning 
Point (1977), in which she was di- 
rected by Herbert Ross. Adocumen- 
ff^fir J^jHr tary feature which she produced, wrote 

IBvHhB? I J^mf^ 1 ^ Jrf IBflf and co-directed. The Other Half of 'the 
HiiHSBs ISbsP^ f J9f | ^Hf was nommatea< f° r an Academy 

Award in 1975. 

MacLaine's first film since win- 
ning her Academy Award Madame 
Sousatzka, directed by John Schlesin- 
ger, will be released this fall by Cin- 
eplex Odeon. In 1987, she played 
herself in the television mini-series 
presentation of her book, Out On A 
Limb, bringing to television the sub- 

"Bobby Harling takes the Steel Magnolias characters to the ject of metaphysics. MacLaine has 
edge of caricature, but never crosses over," says Shirley lectured throughout the United States 
MacLaine, who will play the wealthy Ouiser. — 




IS' 



rdaugh- 
over the 
eighbor 
jnticeat 
wife. 
>revious 
e Secret 
y Lady, 
ussycat, 

iy- 

Natchi- 
; its sets 



"heprin- 
hearsals 
* Ange- 



tes. 



conducting seminars entitled Connect- 
ing With The Higher Self. 

In addition to stage and film work, 
Shirley continues as a television per- 
former, and has won five Emmys for 
her musical variety TV specials. Her 
one-woman show Shirley MacLaine 
On Broadway broke house records in 
New York and continued to draw 
enormous praise in Los Angeles and 
other cities. 

Born Shirley MacLaine Beaty 
(brother Warren added the second "t" 
later), she was raised in Arlington, 
Virginia, by her real estate broker 
father and actress mother. She was 
taking ballet lessons at the age of 2 1/ 
2 and at the age of 20, was understudy- 
ing star Carol Haney in The Pajama 
Game. Haney sprained her ankle three 
days after the show opened, Shirley 
went on for her, and was spotted by 
Hollywood producer Hal Wallis. 

During the next 17 years, Shirley 
made 26 films, averaging one every 
eight months. Her debut, in Alfred 
Hitchcock's The Trouble With Harry, 
established her reputation as a movie 
actress, and she refined and expanded 



her range in her other 50'sroles: Artists 
And Models, Around The World in 80 
Days, The Sheepman, Hot Spell, The 
Matchmaker, Some Came Running, 
Ask Any Girl, and Career. 

During the 60's, Shirley starred in 
Can-Can, The Apartment, Ocean's 
Eleven, All In A Night's Work, Two 
Loves, The Children's Hour, My 
Geisha, Two For The Seesaw, Irma 
LaDouce, What A WayTo Gol, John 
Goldfarb, Please Come Home, The 
Yellow Rolls Royce, Gambit, Woman 
Times Seven, The Bliss of Mrs. Blos- 
som, and Sweet Charity. She co- 
starred with Clint Eastwood in Two 
M ulesFor Sister Sara, and did a series 
of productions for Sir Lew Grade's 
ATV-ITC company in London: the 
film Desperate Characters, a two- 
year TV series called Shirley' s World 
and the film The Possession Of Joel 
Delaney. 

Shirley returned to features in 1975 
with The Turning Point in which she 
co-starred with Anne Bancroft, and 
Being There, opposite Peter Sellers. 

In the early 80's, Shirley com- 
pleted three films: Loving Couples, A 



Change Of Seasons, And Terms Of 
Endearment. For her performance in 
Terms Of Endearment, Shirley re- 
ceived Best Actress honors from the 
Los Angeles and New York Film 
Critics' Circles, a Golden Globe from 
the Hollywood Foreign Press Asso- 
ciation, in addition to the Oscar. 

In the 1960's she became active in 
American politics, as a Robert Ken- 
nedy pledged delegate from Califor- 
nia at the Democratic National Con- 
vention in 1968 and in 1972 as a 
delegate campaigning with equal en- 
thusiasm for George McGovern. 

MacLaine led the first women's 
delegation to China in 1973, a trip that 
resulted in her documentary, The Other 
Ha^ Of The Sky:: A China Memoir, 
which she wrote, produced and co- 
directed. 

Her autobiographical Don't Fall 
Off The Mountain , was published in 
1980 and an instant best seller. At 
about this time, MacLaine turned to 
more spiritual pursuits, which resulted 
in three best sellers, Out On A Limb 

Pancing in The I ,jphf and ii^AJLIa 

The Plaving . 



Stark's many films 
reflect human warmth 



Award-winning Dukakis to play Clairee 



Ray Stark's history as a pro- 
ducer slices through a variety of themes 
and personalities, but the constant is a 
sense of style and relationships. This 
is his eighth film with director Herbert 
Ross, and Stark has teamed for ten 
films with Neal Simon, five films with 
Barbara Streisand, five with Jackie 
Gleason, four with John Huston and 
three with Sydney Pollack. 

Stark's current film is the ex- 
ttemely successful Biloxi Blues, star- 
ling Matthew Broderick, which fol- 
lows Stark's 1987 box office hit The 
Secret Of My Success, starring Mi- 
fejiael J. Fox and directed by Herbert 
Ross. Among Stark's other recent 
films are Peggy Sue Got Married, 
starring Kathleen Turner and Nothing 
u4- In Common, starring Tom Hanks and 
^ Jackie Gleason. 

His past successes range from 
Funny Girl, Fat City, The Way We 
Were, The Goodbye Girl and The 
saming m^Electric Horseman to Smokey And 
vided a num The Bandit. 

xtials and al | Ray Stark'sfilmsalmostalways 
Sum and T\ reflect caring and warmth in human 
relationships. And it was in this effort 
; her teaming that Stark was honored in 1980 with 
lonstadt an<jihe Academy of Motion Picture Arts 
snd Sciences' Irving G. Thalberg 
Music AssoUward for a lifetime of achievement 
recentalbunj in films. 

Stark moved into motion pic- 
lure production following an earlier 



thers. 



rt of her nev 



ing force be ' 
7-acre thenw 
>Uy's artistr] 
eserving he 
tage and Eas 

omes locate< 
.Hollywood 
le where sin 
of 22 years 
Carl Dean 



career as a literary agent for such 
writers as Raymond Chandler, J.P. 
Marquand and Ben Hecht, and subse- 
quently a talent agent, representing 
William Holden and Kirk Douglas, 
among others. 

In 1957, he formed Seven Arts 
Productions with Eliot Hyman, serv- 
ing as executive vice president and 
head of production. In 1964, he pro- 
duced two John Huston films, The 
Night Of The Iguana and Reflections 
In A Golden Eye. Later in 1964, he left 
Seven Arts to produce the Broadway 
musical Funny Girl, based on the life 
of Fanny Brice (the mother of his wife 
Frances) and starring Barbara Strei- 
sand. 

In 1966, Stark formed Rastar 
Productions to produce the film ver- 
sion of Funny Girl, directed by Wil- 
liam Wyler, with Herbert Ross debut- 
ing his screen career in directing the 
film's musical numbers. Stark's other 
film's with Ross include last year's 
The Secret Of My Success, Funny 
Lady, The Sunshine Boys, Goodbye 
Girl, California Suite and Owl And 
The Pussycat. 

Stark's diverse list of films in- 
clude such others as Annie, The Toy, 
Blue Thunder, Seems Like OldTimes, 
The Cheap Detective, Chapter Two, 
Murder By Death, The Way We Were, 
For Pete's Sake, Funny Lady and 
Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams. 



Olympia Dukakis, who plays 
Clairee, the elegant widow of the 
former mayor, won an Academy 
Award for Best Supporting Actress 
earlier this year for her engaging por- 
trayal of the housewife in Moonstruck. 
Following the award she appeared 
with John Travolta and Kirstie Alley 
in Daddy' s Money. 

Dukakis' screen credits include 
John Loves Mary, Death Wish, Made 
For Each Other, Rich Kids, National 
Lampoon Goes To Hollywood, and 
The Idolmaker. She has appeared on 
such primetime television series as 
Kojak and The Equalizer, and was 
once a regular on the daytime drama, 
Search For Tomorrow. Her televi- 
sion film credits include The Seagull, 
One Of The Boys, King Of America 



and FDR: The Last Days. 

Her stage appearances on Broad- 
way include the Mike Nichols hit 
comedy, Social Security, along with 
Abraham Cochrane, The Aspen 
Papers, The Night Of The Iguana, and 
Who's Who In Hell. 

Winner of two Obie Awards, most 
recently forChristopher Durang's The 
Marriage OfBetteAndBoo; Dukakis' 
extensive off-Broadway credits also 
include Electra, Titus Andronicus, 
Peer Gynt, The Memorandum, The 
Curse Of The Starving Class and 
Brecht's Mann Ish Mann, for which 
she won her first Obie. She is a 
veteran of more than a hundred re- 
gional theatre productions, and has 
appeared frequently in such venues as 
the Williamstown Festival. 



While working as a physical thera- 
pist after her graduation from Boston 
University, Dukakis soon earned 
enough money to return to her alma 
mater for a master's degree in theatre 
arts. She became a graduate professor 
of drama at New York University, a 
position she held for fifteen years. 
Dukakis is a founding member of two 
regional theaters: The Charles Play- 
house in Boston, and The Whole 
Theater in Montclair, New Jersey, 
which was nominated for a Tony 
Award and won the state's Artistic 
Achievement Award in 1966. 

Currently the Whole's Theater's 
producing/artistic director, Dukakis 
is also a founding member of two 
summer theaters in Massachusetts, at 
Martha's Vineyard and Cape Cod. 




Ray Stark 
Producer 



Hannah believes play well written 




orma Rae, f< 
rst Oscar. 
Back Ro< 
Kiss Me G 
vinhersecofl 
he Heart. H4 
ude Murphy] 
a merand5«'J 
tine and StevJ 

Angeles wifl 

reisman (wM 
[ier three son| 





Daryl Hannah, playing An- 
nelle, the young woman whocomesto 
apprentice at the beauty shop, is rap- 
idly moving into more dramatic fea- 
ture roles, a direction that began with 
Roxanne, the updated version of Cyr- 
ano de Bergerac, in which she co- 
starred with Steve Martin, and contin- 
ued in Wall Street with Michael 
Douglas. 

Hannah studied at Chicago's pres- 
tigious Goodman Theater and later 
with the renowned drama coach Stella 
Adler. Appearing in her first com- 
merical at the age of 1 1 , Hannah made 
her feature film debut in The Fury 
before completing high school. 

Shortly after moving to Los Ange- 
les and enrolling at USC, Hannah's 
career took off and she began to win 
important roles, ranging from the 
ABC-TV series Paper Dolls to theat- 
rical features such as Summer Lovers. 

Hannah is best known for her per- 
formance in Splash, the movie that 
made mermaids a national fantasy. 
Hannah also starred in Reckless oppo- 
site Aidan Quinn and in The Pope Of 
Greenwich Village opposite Mickey 
Rourke. Hannah portrayed a prehis- 
toric woman in Clan Of The Cave 
Bear, and starred as a troubled per- 
formance artist in Legal Eagles, with 
Robert Redford and Debra Winger. 



"I think I will take off a few days and visit the Democratic 
Convention in Atlanta," says Olympia Dukakis, who plans to 
campaign for her cousin Mike. 

Nominated 44 times 

Ross enjoys working with 

Magnolias "dream cast" 

Herbert Ross' 2 1st feature film 
in 20 years will be Steel Magnolias. 
His credits include such diverse mo- 
tion pictures as Funny Lady, The Owl 
and The Pussycat, Play it Again, Sam, 
Pennies From Heaven, The Sunshine 
Boys, The Turning Point, The Goo- 
abye Girl, and Footloose. A statistic 
Uat speaks for itself is that Ross' 
flms have received forty-four Acad- 
eny Award nominations. 

Ross began his career as a cho- 
nographer for the American Ballet 
Theater and subsequently the Broad- 
way stage, where his Broadway cred- 
it as choreographer and musical di- 
rector included / Can Get It For You 
Wholesale, Tovarich (for which 
Mvien Leigh won a Tony), House of 
Fowers, The Gay Life (for which 
Birbara Cook was nominated for a 
T»ny), On a Clear Day You Can See 
Firever, The Apple Tree (for which 
Birbara Harris won a Tony), and the 
Tmy -nominated Anyone Can Whistle. 

Ross directed Barbra Streisand's 
srow-stopping number as Miss 
Mu-melstein in the Broadway musi- 
ca / Can Get It For You Wholesale, 
wlich led to him directing her first 
sceen test for the film Funny Girl. 

In 1976, Ross and wife Nora 
Ktye produced and directed The 
Seen-Percent Solution, starring Ni- 
co Williamson as Sherlock Holmes. 
Twj Herbert Ross films released in 
197 — The Turning Point with Anne 
Baicroft, Shirley Maclaine, and 
Mkhail Baryshnikov; and Neil 




T' 

v e been horseback riding, but I really want to see an alligator," remarks Hannah, 
no brought her dog with her to the NSU press conference. 




Simon's The Goodbye Girl with Rich- 
ard Dreyfuss and Marsha Mason — 
were honored with a total of 1 5 Acad- 
emy Award nomination, including 
Best Picture for each. Ross was nomi- 
nated as Best Director for The Turn- 
ing Point, produced by Nora Kaye; 
and Richard Dreyfuss won the Oscar 
as Best Actor for The Goodbye Girl. 

Alsoin 1977, Ross directedNeil 
Simon's Chapter Two on Broadway. 
The production received four Tony 
Awards. Ross then returned to Cali- 
fornia to direct the film version of 
California Suite, for which Maggie 
Smith won an Oscar as Best Support- 
ing Actress. 

Ross and Kaye then produced 
the musical drama Pennies From 
Heaven, starring Steve Martin and 
Bemadette Peters. Ross directed and 
produced with Neil Simon the film 
version of / Ought To Be In Pictures 
and Max Dugan Returns. Ross di- 
rected the phenomenally successful 
Footloose with Kevin Bacon and 
Protocol starring Goldie Hawn. In 
1985, Ross staged for his friend 
Stephen Sondheim the extremely 
successful concert Follies at the Lin- 
coln Center and then went on to pro- 
duce and direct The Secret Of My 
Success with Michael J. Fox andDanc- 
ers with Mikhail Baryshnikov. His 
most recent film, The Secret of My 
Success, in which he teamed with 
producer Ray Stark, was among the 
highest grossing films of 1987. It 
starred Michael J. Fox. 




Herbert Ross 
Director 






Harling f s work 
Cinderella story 

Robert Harling drew 
upon his childhood experiences 
growing up in a small southern 
town in writing Steel Magno- 
lias, which has been a hit play in 
New York. Harling wrote the 
play and screenplay based on 
incidents occurring within the 
circle of his own family and 
friends and on remembrances of 
growing up in Natchitoches, 
Louisiana, where the film is 
being shot. 

Harling's success with the 
play is its own "Cinderella 
story," since Harling came to 
New York as an actor, but was 
to find instant critical success 
with his first writing effort The 
play was first staged in March, 
1987, in the Off-Off Broadway 
WPA Theater and, following its 
strongly favorable critical reac- 
tion, moved to Off-Broadway's 
Lucille Lortel Theater six 
months later. 



PAGE 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



JULY 5, 1988 



NEWS 



Northwestern student offers artistic entertainment 

Domingue stages one man show 



By H. SCOTT JOLLEY 
Staff Writer 

Damian Domingue describes his 
upcomingperformance as "a one-man 
musical cabereL" TheLousianaSchol- 
ars College sophomore will stage his 
musical show, entitled "Putting It 
Together," at Northwestern's Theatre 
Weston July 13-14 and 16-17. It will 
begin at 8:30 pm and there is no 
admission charge. 

"The show is in the tradition of 
Jackie Mason and Michael Feinstein 
and has 16 different numbers from 14 
different musicals," says Domingue, 
a theater major from Lafayette. 

He will start the show off with a 
quote by James Conrad: "Art is made 
up of design, disguise, illusion, color, 



and light." Dominigue says "I taken 
that and put it all together — that' s my 
basic premise." 

Most of the numbers are indi- 
vidual pieces, but some are linked 
together in different ways. 'There 
will be some transitions. The ones 
that are obvious don't require an 
explanation — everything comes to- 
getherwith lightand movement," says 
Dominigue. "Some songs will need 
to be verbally explained anddiscussed 
and I'll do that" 

"I've been working on it since 
November and it combines many dif- 
ferent aspects of art and music. So it's 
taken a while." He began with over 
300 songs and chose 52 which he 
thought applied to the show's idea. 



From there, Domingue narrowed the 
song list to 22 and then to 16. 

"All of the songs, music, cos- 
tumes, and everything else are pre- 
packaged and ready to go," he says, 
adding that he plans to use his show as 
an audition for graduate studies at 
New York University. 

Directed by Dominigue and 
assistant director Ciccy Leach, "Put- 
ting It Together" has already been 
signed for a repeat performance in the 
fall. Leach enjoys working with the 
artist, commenting "He' s put so much 
into it. It's a lot of hard work." 

Dominigue is a staff artist for 
the summer edition of the Current 
Sauce and is a member of Kappa Alpha 
Order 



Louisiana Repertory Theatre 
now offering series tickets 



NATCHITOCHES— Series 
tickets went on sale Friday, July 1 , for 
the opening season of the Louisiana 
Repertory Theatre, a professional 
theatre company which will be in 
residence during the 1988 fall semes- 
ter at Northwestern State University. 

Directed by Warren Hammack, 
the Louisiana Repertory Theatre will 
be presenting a series of plays in rota- 
tion, with the first show scheduled to 
open October 7. In addition, a special 
Christmas show will be staged No- 
vember 29 through December 4. 

The productions and their open- 
ing dates are Romeo and Juliet, the 
classic tragedy by William 
Shakespeare, Friday, Oct. 7; Anna 
Christie, a powerful drama which won 
Eugene O'Neill a second Pulitzer 
Prize, Saturday, Oct 8; Noises Off, a 
farce by MichaelFrayn, Saturday, Oct. 
8; I'm Not Rappaport, a comedy by 
Herb Gardner, Sunday Oct 9; and The 
Dickens Christmas Carol Show, a 
delightful adaption of Charles 
Dickens' A Christmas Carol written 



by Arthur Scholey, with music com- 
posed and arranged by Norman 
Beedie, Friday, November 25. 

Lillian Taylor, administrative 
liaison for the Louisiana Repertory 
Theatre, said all five of the plays will 
be presented in the Fine Arts Audito- 
rium of the A.A. Fredericks Creative 
and Performing Arts Center at North- 
western. 

Performances are scheduled for 
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 
at 7:30 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., Satur- 
day at 2:30p.m.and8p.m.,andSunday 
at 2:30 p.m. 

"All a person has to do is choose 
the day of the week that best suits their 
schedule," said Mrs. Taylor. "If Tues- 
day night is best, then that person will 
purchase the Tuesday series and will 
see a different play each week on 
Tuesday nights. You will see all of the 
plays but only on nights that are best 
for the patron." 

Five-play subscription prices are 
$24.50forSaturday and Sunday mati- 
nees, $28 for the Tuesday, Wednes- 



day and Thursday evening perform- 
ances, and $35.50 for the Friday and 
Saturday night shows. 

A three-play modern series — 
featuring I'm Not Rappaport, Anna 
Christie and Noises Off — is available 
at prices of $2 1 .50 for the Friday night 
shows and $14.50 for the Saturday 
matinees. 

Romeo and Juliet and The Dick- 
ens' Christmas Carol Show are the 
offerings in the two-play classic se- 
ries. Subscription prices for this series 
are $9.50 for the Saturday and Sunday 
matinees, $11 for the Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday evening 
performances and $14 for the Friday 
and Saturday night shows. 

Single ticket prices to see each 
of the five shows being presented 
during the opening season of the 
Louisiana Repertory Theatre are$7.50 
for evening shows on Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday, $9.50 for 
the Friday and Saturday night shows, 
and $6.50 for matinee performances 
on Saturday and Sunday. 



Johnson boosts number of track recruits 



ByTOMWANCHO 
Contributor 

Leon Johnson boosted the num- 
ber of 1989 track recruits to five after 
signing four thinclads last week. 

Quarter-miler Chad McDavid, a 
native of Lake Highlands High School 
in Dallas, Texas will be a member of 
Northwestern's team next spring. 
McDavid has a career-best48.2 in the 
400 meter run and has also turned in a 
21.7 in the 200 meters. 



Greg Robertson of Richardson 
High School in Richardson, Texas 
has been clocked at 14.1 in the 110 
meter hurdles and at 38.6 in the 300 
intermediate hurdles. Robertson has 
also long jumped 23 feet. 

Former St Mary 's standout Dan 
Ahrens returns to Natchitoches and 
Northwestern State University, where 
he'll compete in most distance races. 
Ahrens, who attended LSU in Baton 
Rouge last year but did not compete in 
track and field, won a pair of cross 



country state championships as aTiger 
and captured the mile state title during 
his junior campaign. 

Coming the furthest to join (he 
Demon fold is Prince Levy, an excel- 
lent half-miler from St Elizabeth, 
Jamaica. Levy, who attended Prairie 
View for one year before returning to 
his home country last year, has been 
timed at 1:5 1.8 in the half mile run. 

Johnson has now signed five 
men to go along with six women for 
the 1988 cross country and 1989 trick 
seasons. 



Northwestern 
football camp 
dates slated 



By TOM WANCHO 
Contributor 

July 10-13 are the dates set for 
Northwestern State's football camp, 
and head coach Sam Goodwin reports 
that interest in this year's four day 
event has been keener than in past 
years. 

"We've received applications 
from areas in the state where we've 
never had any kids from before," 
Goodwin reported earlier this week. 

The camp, which costs $ 1 50 for 
those staying on campus and $75 for 
commuters, is open to all boys from 
the fifth through twelfth grades. That 
total cost includes all meals, camp 
insurance, camp T-Shirt and instruc- 
tion. 

Any Natchitoches boy who 
wishes to attend the camp but pass on 
the meals may do so for $50. 

Former Demons and current 
NFL products Odessa Turner, John 
Stephens and James Hall will be on 
hand to aid in the instruction. Contact 
camp director Don Shows at (318) 
357-6466 for further details or a camp 
brochure. 



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Folk festival set for July 15-17 



NATCHITOCHES— The 
Louisiana Folklife Center at North- 
western State University will present 
July 15-17 in Prather Coliseum the 
ninth annual Natchitoches-North west- 
em Folk Festival, a multi-cultural 
celebration which has continued to 
grow in stature as one of the three 
major Louisiana folk festivals. 

As usual, the Natchitoches- 
Northwestern Folk Festival will pres- 
ent more than 25 musical groups which 
play old-time country, bluegrass, 
blues, gospel, honky-tonk and all types 
of music typical of modern life. Also, 
a wide variety of ethnic foods and 
more than 40 traditional crafts will be 
presented. 

This year's festival sessions 
include the Friday Night Music Show 
from 8 p.m. to 1 1 p.m., the Saturday 
Daytime Program from 10 a.m. to 6 
p.m., the Saturday Night Music Show 
from 8 p.m. to 1 1 p.m., and the Sunday 
Daytime Program from 10 a.m. to 6 
p.m. 

The ninth edition of the Natchi- 
toches-Northwestern Folk Festival 
will present a special salute to South- 
west Louisiana, the heart of Prairie 
Cajun Country. 

Festival director Dr. Donald W. 
Hatley, professor of English and di- 
rector of the Louisiana Folklife Cen- 
ter, said, "Cm Saturday mornings from 
Mamou to Opelousas, from Eunice to 
Ville Platte, from Lafayette to Turkey 
Creek, Cajun bands set people to 
dancing at Fred's Lounge in Mamou, 
the Plantation Club in Opelousas, and 
in other dance halls throughout Cajun- 
land." 

"On Saturday afternoons while 
gumbo and etoufee simmer in the pot," 
said Hatley, "Cajuns get ready to start 
off the evening at the 'Le Bons Temp 
Rouler' live Cajun music radio show 
at the beautifully restored Liberty 
Theatre in Eunice." 

At 4 p.m. Friday, Mardi Gras 
runners from Eunice and Tee Mamou 
Prairie will participate in the Country 
Mardi Gras run down the streets of 
Natchitoches. 



Tee Mamou Gras participants 
chant a 33-year-old song, completely 
cover themselves in traditional, hand- 
made costumes, and do not allow 
outsiders to run with them. In Eunice, 
16 miles north of Iota, the run takes on 
a trail-ride atmosphere, and visitors 
who dress for the occasion are wel- 
come to run. 

According to Hatley, a Mardi 
Gras runner is call a Mardi Gras. 

"As everybody on the prairie 
knows, Mardi Gras beg for chickens, 
sausage, vegetables, anything to go 
into the gumbo," Hatley said. "When 
everything is given for the gumbo, the 
Mardi Gras Run stops for a dance or 
two to the accompaniment of a two or 
three-member Cajun band." 

After the Natchitoches-North- 
westem Folk Festival Mardi Gras Run 
is finished, Eunice and Tee Mamou 
runners will gather in front of Prather 
Coliseum and give a short program on 
the traditional country Mardi Gras. 
Then, cooks will begin preparing the 
official Natchitoches-Northwestern 
Gumbo. 

Beginning at 8 p.m. Friday, the 
Cajun celebration will continue with 
the first-ever Liberty Theatre Cajun 
Music Road Show sponsored by the 
city of Eunice, the Jean Lafitte Na- 
tional Historical Park, and the Ac- 
adian Cultural Center. 

Paul Daigle and Cajun Gold, 
selected the best Cajun band in Cajun- 
land by the readers of the Times of 
Acadiana, J. C. Labbaie and Fred 
Charlie, Dave Peti tjean , Barry Ancelet 
and other cooks and storytellers will 
perform on the Liberty Theatre Cajun 
Music Road Show in Prather Coli- 
seum. 

While the Mardi Gras Run and 
the Liberty Theatre Cajun Music Road 
Show will be presented on Friday, 
throughout the weekend craftspeople, 
cooks, storytellers and musicians will 
celebrate life on the prairie in south- 
west Louisiana 

"What is really amazing," said 
Hatley, "is the fact that people from 
all over the country, especially the 



hundreds of visitors we have from 
Texas, come to our festival expecting 
some form of Cajun life, whether it is 
music, dance or food." 

In the east concourse of Prather 
Coliseum, a replica of Fred's Lounge 
in Mamou will be the site of continu- 
ous music played by the Cankton 
Cajuns, None Jules and Lacher Ley, 
the Roy Fontenot band, and Jean 
Savoie's Bayou Ramblers. 

On Sunday afternoon, the 
Natchitoches-Northwestern Folk 
Festival will close with zydeco accor- 
dionist John Delafose who, with his 
world-famous Eunice Playboys, will 
play for a two-hour fais do-do. 

On the dance floor for Sunday 
afternoon's final main stage perform- 
ance will be several zydeco dancers 
from the Zydeco Festival in Plaisance. 

Everybody knows that where 
there are Cajuns, there is food. Those 
who attend the ninth annual Natchito- 
ches-Northwestern Folk Festival will 
savor crawfish etouffee, boudin, jam- 
balaya, cracklins hot from the grease 
and delicious pecan pralines. 

The crafts' portion of the Satur- 
day and Sunday daytime programs 
will feature such master craftsmen as 
accordion makers Marc Savoy and 
Larry Miller, Mardi Gras mask mak- 
ers Jackie Miller and Georgia Man- 
uel, saddle maker J.E. "Boo" LeDoux 
who will also serve as the Mardi Gras 
Honorary Capitaine, and chair maker 
Preston Watley. 

"Craftspeople from the Eunice 
area have been featured in many 
publications and at numerous festi- 
vals," said Hatley. 

Festival tickets for the Friday and 
Saturday Night Music Shows are $4 
for adults and $3 for children, and for 
the Saturday and Sunday Daytime 
Programs tickets are $5 for adults and 
$3 for children. 

Forfurther information, call357- 
4332 or write the Natchitoches-North- 
western Folk Festival, Louisiana 
FolklifeCenter.P.O. Box 3663,North- 
western State University, Natchito- 
ches, La. 71497. 




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JULY 5, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 5 




™ pITORIAL 



Cousin Mike says: Oly mpia Dukakis is really a Republican! 



Current 

Enquirer 





Tommy Whitehead and Shirley MacLaine secret lovers? 

Sources reveal their bizarre rituals include pretending they're each other 



Producers confirm: 
Oaryl Hannah 
is a mute; 
her dog is a 
ventroquilist 
say experts 





How perm rods can lead 
to a shaplier you: 
Dolly Parton tells how 
she maintains her 
17-inch waistline> 
on the "Steel Magnolias" 
diet/exercise plan 




Jeanne Dixon predicts: Mia Roberts wiiigain an identity! 







Needed: 
Writers for summer 
Current Sauce 
Contact: 

Steve Horton, Kyser 103, 357-5213 
or 

Sonya Rigaud, 357-5456 




Happy Birthday 
America! 



Current Sauce 



The Current Sauce is published weekly during the 
and spring semesters by the students of Northwest- 
> State University of Louisiana. It is not associated 
any of the University's departments and to fl- 
j^ced independently. 

t The Current Sauce is based in the Office of 
Went Publications located In Kyser Hafl. The office 
?*fce editorial staff is 225H, telephone (318) 357t$456. 



adviser's office is 103 Kyser HaH, telephone 357- 



5*13 

, The mailing address for the Current Sauceis P.O. 

^5306, NSU, Natchitoches, LA 71497. 

, All correspondence, including letters to the ecfi- 
welcome. Material submitted for consideration 
be malted to the above address or brought to 

f* office. 

The deadGne for all advertisement and copy is 3 
A each Friday. Inclusion of any and all material b 

* to the discretion of the editor. 
. Utters to the editor should be typed (double- 
f^oed), signed and should Include a telephone 
j^ber where the writer can be reached. No anony- 

letters will be printed. 
. Current Sauce subscription rates are S 1 1 per 
l Odemic year (28 issues) or $6 per semester (14 
kJU*')- The paper is entered as second-class mail at 

Q fchitoches. LA. The USPS number is 140-660. 



Summer r 88 



Writer addresses 
student athletes 



By WANDA HAMILTON 
Staff Writer 

Free boarding, free tuition, 
numerous excused absences from 
class, lots of practice, and in many 
cases, no college degree at the end of 
four years . . . 

The people who fit this descrip- 
tion are mostiy members of the foot- 
ball, baseball, track and basketball 
teams who are coming to school on 
scholarship. These are mainly males, 
and I'm sorry to say, black. 

Many colleges and universities 
use athletes to build a sporting name 
for their particular institution and give 
them (the athletes) nothing in return. 

To the average high school boy, 
being a college athlete is his number 
one goal and dream. However, there 
are those who know better. 

I always thought college was 
the place to begin preparing for your 
future. You decide what and where 
you would like to be four years from 
now. In my opinion you are supposed 
to work hard at reaching this. For 
some of you, however, working hard 
is only what you do in your spare time. 
First, you make sure that your team is 
number one and stays that way. Then 
you study, but only if you have time 
and feel like it 



Not every college and univer- 
sity sporting departments follow this 
pattern of sports being first; studies 
being second. But there are lots that 
do. 

We all know that not everyone 
can be a star, and that's what most 
athletes are striving for . . . fame, 
fortune and the good life all rolled up 
in one. 

The sad part about it is that four 
years come and go so quickly. That 
free life at NSU or LSU or NLU or 
wherever is over. Let's hope you've 
completed all of your requirements 
and can graduate. 

If you can't graduate or you 
weren't lucky enough to get drafted, 
then you're out on your own. Hope- 
fully you have the funds available to 
pay for the remainder of your educa- 
tion. Because now you are no longer 
able to use the benefits of the scholar- 
ship you once had and you have noth- 
ing to show for your four years but a 
few good memories of the fun times 
and maybe being named as Most 
Valuable Player. 

I have seen college sports get 
the best of some really great athletes 
and leave them struggling in the end. 
My advice is don't let yourself fall 
into a trap. I am ail for extracurricular 
activities, but don't let that be your 
whole life. 



Editor gives purposes for 
"negative" and "positive' 
points of view in paper 




SONYA RIGAUD 
Editor 




LISA DARDEN DAYNA DOOLEY 
H. SCOTT JOLLEY WANDA HAMILTON 
Stqff Writers 


ALLEN EVANS 
Advertising Manager 


H. SCOTT JOLLEY 
Photographer 




DAMIAN DOMINIGUE 
Cartoonist 




EDD LEE 

Circulation/Distribution 


STEVE HORTON 
Graduate Adviser 




TOM WHITEHEAD 
Adviser 



By SONYA RIGAUD 
Editor 

As most of you know, in the past 
year the Current Sauce has received a 
vast amount of criticism of having too 
much "negative" reporting. Many 
people spoke up to me and other 
members of the staff about their dis- 
satisfaction. 

I would like to take this chance 
to explain a few things to you so that 
you may better understand the pur- 
poses of our "negative" reporting and 
also our "positive" reporting. 

All reported material in the 
Current Sauce is presented to you in a 
factual and an unbiased manner 
whether it be negative or positive. 
Any negativity is due to the subject 
matter of the article. 

For example, when the Current 
Sauce covered the conflict with the 
proposed impeachment of our com- 
missioner of elections, this was defi- 
nitely a negative type of coverage. 
However, it was presented to the stu- 
dents with the facts and did not offer 
any biased remarks, . . .except on the 
EDITORIAL page. 

Now, here's where the problem 
is! So many people have often said, 
"Okay, let's see who they are going to 
attack this week." Well, the editorial 
page is put in the newspaper for a 
specific reason. It is there to express 
various attitudes and opinions about 
certain people, places, activities, etc. 

There are also editorials, which 
I am famous for writing, that do not 
offend people, but serve a purpose as 
well. These are the kind all you com- 
plainers would like to read more of. 

Some positive editorials are used 
to inform people about things they 
may not already know about. For 
example, I've written many editorials 
that have told you about myself and 
my lifestyle at home in south Louisi- 
ana. I've talked about my experiences 
with crawfishing, which is something 
a lot of you know nothing about. And 
I've explained Mardi Gras, -its origin 
and what actually takes place during 
this time. 

And I wrote an editorial 
entitled,"Registration woes worse at 
other NSU." Some of you have at- 
tended Northwestern all throughout 
your college career and may not have 
realized that it could be worse some- 
where else. This was also to inform 
you about something you knew noth- 
ing about. 



Some other editorials are used 
to encourage readers to do something. 
Some examples include my editorial 
entitled "Drag me out to the ball- 
game." This editorial was written to 
encourage students to attend, 
Northwestern's baseball games. I also 
wrote a couple to interest students in 
attending basketball games. 

Now let's get back to the nega- 
tive side of things. I've learned that it 
is the job of the journalist to inform, 
interpret, and entertain. If it is neces- 
sary for him to address a controversial 
topic, then he must do so. 

Readers have the right to know 
the truth and it would not be fair to 
hold back anything because it is too 
"negative." 

There are certain articles and 
editorials printed in the Current Sauce 
with the hope of obtaining certain 
reactions. 

As it is said in an editorial in 
Press Time addressing accusations of 
negativism: "We print certain articles 
in the hope that readers will gain 
something. If the readers gain knowl- 
edge of which they were previously 
ignorant, we have succeeded. If the 
readers are shown another side of an 
issue, we have succeeded. If a state- 
ment we make causes conversation 
among readers, we have succeeded. 
And if an article we print brings about 
change in an institution or practice, 
three cheers!" 

The editorial goes on to say the 
following: "It is our aim to show all 
sides of every issue we cover-to in- 
form readers accurately-to interpret 
issues sincerely. We refuse to turn a 
deaf ear to local school problems. 
They should be exposed and ultimately 
corrected. If, in doing so, we offend 
our readers, we will not quit." 

The Current Sauce does not 
shape the image of Northwestern State 
University. It only indicates what is 
going on and what are some of the 
problems with the university in hope 
that these problems may be corrected. 

There are a lot of positive as- 
pects about Northwestern. However, 
this is no reason for us to overlook the 
bad, and pretend that it is not there. 

Amy Gender ends her editorial, 
saying, "Society without both posi- 
tive and negative aspects is no society 
at all. A newspaper which does not 
expose both the positive and negative 
components of its community is no 
newspaper." 

I agree with her totally. 



PAGE 6 



CURRENT SAUCE 



CAMPUS LINE 



SAB uses summer to plan for fall 



By LISA DARDEN 
Staff Writer 

While some students think of 
summer as lazy days spent skiing and 
sunbathing, to members of the Stu- 
dent Activities Board (SAB) summer 
means hard work and planning for the 
upcoming year. 

"This summer the committee 
members are working hard on their 
specific projects," said Mary Miller, 
SAB president. "We're planning 
ahead, getting organized and striving 
for excellence for the fall semester." 

Miller said SAB is planning 
changes for Homecoming, State Fair, 
Welcome Week and pre-game par- 
ties. "We want to offer a more excit- 
ing variety of activities for the fall and 
spring semesters." 

Miller said Public Relations 
Director Tracy Fisher is planning 
special projects to publicize the new 
events. "Tracy is a PR major and 
should have some good practical 
experience in promotion," Miller said. 

In addition to planning activi- 
ties for students in the fall term, the 
Board is also making plans for a new 
activity room according to Carl Henry, 
director of Student Organizations and 
Activities. 



Located on the first floor of 
Friedman Student Union in the old 
bowling alley, the now-empty room 
will be converted into a combination 
bar, dance floor and entertainment 
area, Henry said. 

Tentative plans include a hard- 
wood dance floor, mirrored wall, 20- 
foot bar, brass hand rails, tables and 
chairs, special lighting and sound 
system, and increased stage area. 
Henry said the special lighting and 
sound system will enable the area to 
be changed from an entertainment 
room with e mphas is on the stage to a 
dimly-lit dance area with floor light- 
ing. The sound and lighting system 
will be controlled from a special DJ 
booth that will be constructed near the 
stage. 

"When completed, it will be a 
very nice multi-purpose area for the 
students," Henry said. "The room can 
be used for small dances, comedians, 
coffee house entertainers and recruit- 
ing." 

Henry said the walls of the room 
will be painted a dark green and the 
floor will tiled in black and white. 

"We want it to resemble 
Bennigan's with a dark green interior 



and antiques hanging on the walls," 
Miller said of the color scheme. 

Upon completion, the activity 
room will replace the Union Station 
which is currendy used for student 
programming. Itza Pizza located next 
to Union Station will take over the 
Union Station area in order to expand 
its dining area and games room. 

Although the Board has been 
talking about renovating the room for 
more than two years, the currentplans 
are the most definite steps made yet. 
Work has not started on the project 
but will begin after the new fiscal year 
(July 1). Completion date is set for 
prior to the fall semester. 

"Our intentions are to attempt to 
have the project completed by the 
opening of the fall semester. Due to 
budget considerations we will have to 
wait until the new fiscal year in order 
to begin," said Fred Fulton , director c f 
Student Life. 

Fulton said the project is cur- 
rendy in its preliminary stages and is 
awaiting funding; however, furniture 
for the activity room has been or- 
dered. 

SAB meets 7 p.m. Tuesday's 
during the summer term. 



Students must prove citizenship to work 



WASHINGTON DC— If you're 
planning to get a new job this summer, 
you'd better make sure you have the 
necessary documents to prove you're 
eligible to work in America. 

Whether you're a citizen born 
in this country or an alien legally 
authorized to take a job here, you are 
required, under a new law which took 
effect last year, to show your em- 
ployer documents which verify your 
identity and employment eligibility. 

If you can't provide the docu- 
ments, an employer violates the law 
by putting you on the payroll. So it's 
obviously to your advantage to have 
the necessary papers in hand when 
you go out to seek a job. 

Most of us already have the 
documents we need to comply with 
the law. Employees are required to 
establish both their identity and their 
eligibility for employment, and there 
are several individual items which 
can serve both of these purposes. An 
American passport, even if expired, 
will do it, and so will a certificate of 
naturalization or an alien registration 



card. A current foreign passport with 
work authorization is also accc ptable. 

Persons who don't have these 
items can show one document for 
identification and a second one to 
prove work eligibility. Acceptable 
identification documents are driver 
licenses, voter registration cards, 
school or government issued identifi- 
cation cards with photo; and for per- 
sons under 1 8, medical records, report 
cards and other school documents. 

For verifying employment eli- 
gibility you can show a Social Secu- 
rity Card, a birth certificate or an INS 
form 1-94 with an employment au- 
thorization stamp. 

There are other documents also 
acceptable for the verification proce- 
dure, and you can see a full list of them 
in an Immigration and Naturalization 
Service (INS) booklet called "Hand- 
book for Employers," available at your 
public library or your nearest INS 
office. INS also has a toll-free num- 
ber, 1-800-777-7700, where you can 
get additional information. 

This new law, the Immigration 
Reform and Control Act of 1986, is 

UXAM-NIS ACCEPIAULfc 10 OOMHIEIK 1-9 



already making more jobs available to 
American citizens and aliens author- 
ized to work in our country . It does not 
place a heavy burden on employees 
by requiring hem to provide docu- 
ments and fill out a simple form , so be 
prepared to do this when you go out to 
look for a job. If you don't have the 
documents you need, it's a good idea 
to apply for them immediately. 

The INS is seeking assistance to 
ensure that students entering the labor 
market are aware of the requirements 
of the Immigration and Nationality 
Act as amended by the Immigration 
Reform and Control Act of 1 986. The 
law now requires that an employer 
review a document or documents that 
would establish both the identity and 
the eligibility for employment in the 
United States of individuals hired after 
November 6, 1986. 

The law has anti-discrimination 
provisions to discourage employers 
form refusing to hire anyone because 
of foreign speech or appearance, and 
you can learn more about this from an- 
other toll-free number 1-800-255- 
7688. 



LIST A 

Docuaonts That Establish Identity ond Eaploysent 

Eli gibilit y 

O Unitod States Passport 

O Certificate of United States Citizenship. (INS Form 
N-560 or N-561) 

O Certificate of Naturalization. (INS Form N-550 or 
N-570 

O Unexpired foreign passport which: 

--Contains an unexpired stamp which reads "Processed 
for 1-551. Temporary Evidence of Lawful Admission 

for permanent residence. Valid Until . 

Employment authorized;" or 

--Has attached thereto a Form 1-94 bearing the same 
name as the passport and contains an employment 
authorization stamp, so long as the period of 
endorsement has not yet expired and the proposed 
employment is not In conflict with any 
restrictions or limitations identified on the 
Form 1-94 

O Alien Registration Receipt Card (INS Form 1-151) or 
Resident Alien Card (INS Form 1-551), provided that 
it contains a photograph of the bearer. 

O Temporary Resident Cord. (INS Form 1-688) 

O Employment Authorization Card. (INS Form I-688A) 



LIST C 

Documents That Establish E»ployent Eligibility 



O Social Security number card, other than on-3 which has 
printed on its face "not valid for employment purposes. 
Note: This must be a card issued by the Social 
Security Administration; a facsimle (such 
as a metal or plastic reproduction that 
people can buy) is not acceptable. 

O An original or certified copy of a birth certificate 
issued by a state, county, or municipal authority 
bearing an official seal 

O Unexpired INS employment authorization 

Unexpired re-entry permit. (INS Form 1-327) 

O Unexpired Refugee Travel Document. (INS Form 1-571) 

Certification of Birth issued by the Department of 
State. (Form FS-545) 

O Certification of Birth Abroad issued by the Department 
of State. (Form DS-1350) 

O United States Citizen Identification Card. (INS Form 
1-197) 

O Native American tribal document 

O Identification Card for use of Resident Citizen in the 
United States. (INS Form 1-179) 



LIST B 

Documents That 



Establish Identity 



For individuals 18 years of age or older: 

O State-issued driver's license or state-issued 
identification card containing a photograph. If 
the driver's license or identification card does 
not contain a photograph, identifying information 
should be included, such as name, date of birth, 
sex, height, color of eyes, and address. 

O School identification card with a photograph 

O Voter's registration card 

O United States Military card or draft record 

Identification card issued by federal, state 
or local government agencies 

O M'litary dependent's identification card 

O Native American tribal documents 

Unitod States Coast Guard Merchant Mariner Card 



O Oriver's license issued by a Canadian government 
authority 

For individuals under age 18 who are unable to produce 
one of the documents listed above: 
O School record or report card 

O Clinic doctor or hospital record 

Daycare or nursery school record 

O If an individual under age 18 cannot produce a List 
A document or one of the identity documents listed in 
Part Nine (List 8), he or she is exempt from producing: 
one if (1) a parent or legal guardian completes 
Section 1 and writes in the space for the minor's 
signature the words, "minor under age 18," (2) the parent 
or legal guardian completes the "Preparer/Translator 
Certification;" and (3) the employer writes in Section 
2 the words, "minor under age 18" under List 8 in the 
space after the words "Document Identification I." 
If this procedure is followed, the minor must still 
produce a List C. document showing employment eligibility. 



SAB 

The Student Activities Board has 
an opening position for concert chair- 
man. Anyone interested should con- 
tact Mary Miller in Rm 214 in the 
student union or call (3 1 8) 357-65 1 1 . 

Zeta Phi Beta 

Xi Epsilon Chapter of Zeta Phi 
Beta Sorority traveled to Beaumont, 
Texas for the Southern Regional 
Executive Board meeting. In atten- 
dance were: Lockey Whitaker, presi- 
dent; Trenna Taylor, vice president; 
and Melissa Frank, secretary. 

Various workshops were held 
which aided the young women with 
ideas on service projects, social events, 
and fund-raising techniques for the 
fall semester. 



Watson Library 

Watson Library hours for the 
summer semester are as follows: 
Monday-Wednesday,8a.m.-10p.m.; 
Thursday-Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat- 
urday-closed; and Sunday-2 p.m.-lO 
p.m. 



"A Cut Above 

Professional 
Hair Care 



if 



Roffler 



(Enchant 




Matrix 



Vikki McNeely 

352-2288 
Earl Dugas 
352-9216 

217 Hwy. 1 South 
(across from Maggio's) 
Open Mon.-Fri., 8-5:30 



105 
Williams 
Avenue 



DP Junctional 



Dixie Plaza Center 





UMMER % 



mm* 






Off on 




Selected Groups Of Dresses 
And Separates 



h A Shop In Natchitoches And Save l"^ 



ComeHomeTo 
Kentucky Fried Chicken. 

TeelTheWarmth, 
Taste The Goodness" 




2 PIECE MEAL 9 PIECE MEAL 



$-| 99 



This coupon good for 2 pieces of Original Recipe or 
Extra Cnspy, or Hot & Spicy Chicken with French 
Fries, and buttermilk biscuit for Only $1.99. Good 
only for white/dark combinations. Customer pays 
all applicable sales tax. Offer expires: July 31. 
1988. Good only at Many and Natchitoches. 



$g so 



This coupon good for 9 pieces of Original Recipe. 
Extra Crispy or Hot & Spicy Chicken, large cole 
slaw, large mashed potatoes, large gravy and 4 
biscuits for only $9.50. Good for white/dark 
combinations only. Customer pays all applicable 
sales tax. Offer expires July 31,1 988. Good only at 
Many and Natchitoches. 



came 






JULY 19, 1988 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 
OF LOUISIANA 



VOL. 77, NO. 4 



nvestigation into rule violations, player payoffs begins 



SONYA RIGAUD 



Northwestern State University 
{begun an internal investigation of 
sable NCAA rules violations by its 
o's basketball program regarding 
ruiting and payments to players. 

Northwestern president Dr. 
jieit Alost said the investigation "is 
result of information concerning 
basketball program which has 
aced." He said that the informa- 
came from "outside the univer- 
f The source of the information 
snot revealed. 



The alleged violations, which 
are not specified, occurred since Don 
Beasley took over as head men's 
basketball coach in 198S. 

Before coming to Northwest- 
ern, Beasley was an assistant basket- 
ball coach at the University of Geor- 
gia, where there was also an NCAA 
investigation of the basketball pro- 
gram at the time of his tenure. The 
decision to hire Beasley for the North- 
western basketball program in 1985 
was delayed by this investigation. 

Dr. Joseph Orze, president of 
Northwestern in 1985, was assured by 
Georgia officials that Beasley had been 
cleared of any "charges of signifi- 
cance" in the investigation. 



According to an article in the 
Alexandria Daily Town Talk, 
North western's investigation on the 
matter arose from speculations about 
Beasley's status in the dismissal of 
assistant men's coach Wayne Wag- 
goner. 

Waggoner's contract, which ex- 
pired June 30, wasnotrenewed for the 
1988-89 year. Beasley said he had no 
role in the dismissal, which contra- 
dicts Jerry Pierce's statement that 
Beasley was a participant in the meet- 
ing at which the decision was made. 
Pierce is the executive assistant to 
Alost 

Alost declined any comment on 



the relation of the investigation to 
Waggoner's departure. 

Alost reported that talk about 
Beasley's resignation is not true. He 
said, "He has not resigned. He is 
employed at the university. He's done 
a fine job elevating our program to a 
competitive level." 

Beasley took over a program 
which had sunk to rock bottom in 
1985 with a 3-25 record and average 
home attendance of about 600 per 
game. He has won 42 games and lost 
41 in three seasons, going 11-16 in 
1985-86, 15-13 in 1986-87 and 16-12 
last year, and attendance at the men's 
basketball games has more than 
doubled during this time period. 



IcCalla to serve as new Head of Education 



H. SCOTT JOLLEY 
ffWriter 

In a way. Dr. Sandra McCalla is 
ng home. She graduated from 
western in 1960 and is now re- 
ting to her alma mater to serve as 
new head of the Department of 
tion on campus. 
However, she has noticed that 
much has changed since her first 
Aside from the obvious physical 
nces, such as the addition of 
i buildings and the renovation of 
ones, McCalla still sees the 
iersity's "warmth and genuine 
test in people and helping to 
eve their goals and aspiration." 

I sense a strong com mitment at 
I with the division of education 
the administration both willing to 
risks to make life better." In her 
job, McCalla shares that commit- 



ment, bringing with her many years of 
experience as both a mathematics 
teacher and an award- winning princi- 
pal of an award-winning school. 

"I have an interest in teacher 
education. I want to train teachers to 
teach," she says with an enthusiastic 
smile. "We're going to need a change 
in education to get ourselves started, 
but it's all going to shake out." Some 
of her immediate plans for the divi- 
sion of education include "fine-tun- 
ing" the curriculum and addressing 
student study skills. 

She also plans to keep the divi- 
sion certified. "You can't just clean 
house when you're expecting com- 
pany,"sheremarked,goingon to point 
out that she will work to keep the 
division's ongoing certification the 
best it can be. She says that she can't 
reveal totally what the division will be 
doing in the fall, hinting only that 



"we'll be bringing an innovative pro- 
gram to thedi vision, to the region, and 
to the state." 

McCalla was brought back to 
Northwestern when President Dr. 
Robert Alost offered her the position. 
"Alost is a great ambassador of the 
campus — I admire him for what he 
does here." Before she accepted the 
job, however, she spent some time at, 
NSU: "I went into the dorms and 
talked with the students," she recalls. 
"They were proud to be here and re- 
ally enjoyed Northwestern." These 
"grass roots" relations helped to "settle 
the offer in my mind." 

Another reason for McCalla's 
acceptance of the position was her 
expectations of Governor Buddy 
Roemer's education reforms. "His 
plans are modeled after South 
Carolina's reform, so we're not creat- 
ing a new wheel, just adjusting the 



spokes on the one we've got," Mc- 
Calla said. 

"If Louisiana is to pull itself out 
of the lower echelons of the education 
system and in order for us to change 
the status quo in education, Roemer's 
reforms are important," says McCalla 
emphatically. 

"His key parts in the plan are 
teacher pay and teacher evaluation. I 
think most teachers will inviteachange 
in their evaluation and I know that 
they will welcome a pay raise," she 
says with a laugh. "The reforms are 
much broader than reading, writing, 
and arithmetic." 



Continued on 
Page 4 



lebert poster promotes parenthood education 




IT TAKES 6HTST8 S€ A PJIUHfT 



E H T 



t> E 8 C A T 1 



By LISA DARDEN 
StaffWriter 

Add New Orleans Saints quar- 
terback Bobby Hebert to cheranks of 
popular athletes appearing on posters. 
However, unlike other athletes, 
Hebert's appearance serves an educa- 
tional purpose. 

Hebert, who played for the 
Northwestern Demons 1979-82, ap- 
pears on the 1988 Sex Equity Project 
poster which promotes parenthood 
education in Louisiana high schools. 
The 28-year-old Hebert appears on 
the poster with his two daughters above 
the slogan "Anyone can be a father. 
But it takes guts to be a parent." 

According to Sally Hunt, 
Northwestern Home Economics in- 
structor and project director, the poster 
is a marketing tool designed to attract 
more males to the parenthood educa- 
tion course. Offered through Home 
Economics to 11th and 12th grade 
high school students, the course 
emphasizes the importance and re- 
sponsibilities of parenthood. The 
poster will be sent to high school 
Home Economics teachers all across 
the state. 

Funding for the poster was 
made available through Title 2, Part 
A, Sex Bias/Stereotyping grant, or, 
more commonly called, the Sex Eq- 
uity Project. The State Department of 
Education, Vocational Education, 
sponsored the grant. The grant was 
awarded to several university Home 
Economics Departments across the 
state and also includes in-service 
workshops and materials, Hunt said. 

In addition to Hebert, another 
tie which the parenthood education 
course has with Northwestern is the 
fact that its curriculum guide was 
designed at Northwestern in 1982. 
Hunt served as project director for the 
designing of the course. 

Hunt said the course contains 



several units including establishing 
the need for parenthood education, 
parental responsibilities, sex educa- 
tion, the developing child and guid- 
ance and behavior. The course en- 
ables students to take a closer, more 
realistic look at the costs of having a 
child, effects on the family, prenatal 
care, pregnancy and actual childbirth. 

The developing child unit ex- 
amines the growth of the child from 
infancy to school-age. The guidance 
and behavior unit touches upon the 
subject of counseling and child abuse. 

Hunt said she believes having 
a prominent male figure on the poster, 
such as Hebert, may make the course 
more attractive to high schoohmales. 

While at Northwestern, Hebert 
ranked third in most career passing 
yards (3 ,789), most completed passes 
(267)and most passes attempted (490). 
Hebert set a single season record in 
1 980 for most yards passing with 1 ,828 
and gained all-America recognition. 
He also owns the top single game 
passing performance of 364 yards 
against Texas-Arlington (Sept. 13, 
1980). His 341 yards against North- 
east Louisiana on Nov. 20, 1982, is 
the second best passing performance 
by a Demon quarterback. 

Following his career at North- 
western, Hebert took the Michigan 
Panthers to the United States Football 
League's (USFL) initial team cham- 
pionship, earning Most Valuable 
Player honors in the process. Two 
years later, in 1985, he took the 
Oakland Invaders to the champion- 
ship game of the USFL before signing 
a free agent contract with the New 
Orleans Saints. 

In 1987, Hebert guided the NFL 
New Orleans Saints to their first win- 
ning season ever (12-3) and into the 
playoffs for the first time. 

Hebert received his degree from 
Northwestern in 1983. 



Alost stated that Northwestern 
"has provided that information to both 
the conference and the NCAA and has 
pledged its assistance and coopera- 
tion to the Southland and the NCAA 
in any action which they might take to 
address the situation." 

The Northwestern president, ath- 
letic director Tynes Hildebrand, as- 
sistant to the president Jerry Pierce 
and university attorney Joe Bertrand 
are conducting the internal review of 
the allegations. 

Alost said the information pre- 
sented to the university concerning 
the men's basketball program will 
require an extensive examination by 



both internal and external sources in 
the weeks ahead." 

The president said Northwest- 
ern "has enjoyed a positive image and 
reputation in its national and confer- 
ence affiliations for more than 80 years 
since intercollegiate sports began here, 
and every effort will be made to assure 
the continued integrity and favorable 
reputation of the university's athletic 
programs." 

"Meanwhile," said Alost, "I will 
not comment further on the situation 
and other officials of the university — 
at my direction — will not discuss the 
matter except in the formal process of 
the review." 



Relocating on July 29 

Center moves to St. Denis, 
upgrades computer system 



By LEAH LUCK 
StaffWriter 

The Northwestern Computer 
Center is moving to St. Denis Hall this 
summer. According to Mr. Larry 
Morrison, director of the Computer 
Center, the old facility no longer had 
the capacity needed to house all the 
hardware and it has been in an unat- 
tainable place when it comes to load- 
ing and unloading equipment. 

Mr. Morrison said that the new 
Computer Center should be finished 
before the fall semester. "We plan to 
start moving the computers into the 
new facility July 29. Then we humans 
will follow suit." 

The new Computer Center will 
house the computer labs for faculty 
and student use, programming facili- 
ties, the institutional research depart- 
ment headed by Dr. Dan Carr, and 
both main frame computers for NSU 
and La. School. It is rumored that the 
new telephone system brain will be 
housed in St Denis as well, but that 
matter isn't decided yet. Mr. Morri- 
son says that if they want to put it in St 
Denis, there will be room. 

This move will cost approxi- 
mately $70,000. Morrison says that 
NSU saved the taxpayers a significant 
amount of money by using our own 
physical plant employees instead of 
hiring contractors. "They have all 
done an excellent job on the renova- 
tions - the painters, the carpenters, and 
the electrical and air conditioning 
crews." 



This move is just one major step 
in a five-part plan to upgrade our 
communication system and computer 
services. Two short-range goals are 
coming within reach very soon: in- 
creasing computer communications 
capabilities among NSU's campuses 
atFortPolk,Natchitoches,Shreveport 
and England AFB; and increasing 
computer hardware inventory by 
$300,000. 

Some long-range plans are in 
the works to be carried out when funds 
are available which will include tele- 
phone pre-registration within 18 
months to 2 years and terminal capac- 
ity in all administration buildings and 
dormitories within 3 to 5 years. Mr. 
Morrison said, 'This means that there 
are plans that say that there will be a 
computer terminal plug-in in each 
dorm room so the students will be able 
to access the network." 

An important note to incoming 
and returning students from the New 
NSU Computer Center: Fall Regis- 
tration will not take place in Kyser 
Hall. For those who have preregis- 
tered and have no need to drop or add 
courses, fee payments may be made 
during registration in the Student 
Union Ballroom. Those who have not 
preregistered or who need to drop or 
add will need to begin the registration 
process at the new Computer Center 
in St. Denis Hall, just down the hill 
from Natchitoches Dorm. Instruc- 
tions and directions will be clearly 
posted so that the process may flow 
smoothly and painlessly. 



■ 1 ■ 



Final 
Examination 
Schedule 

Monday, July 25 
8:00- 10:30 9:30 classes 

2:30 2:00 classes 



12:00 
3:00- 5:30 



12:30 classes 



Tuesday, July 26 
8:00 - 10:30 8:00 classes 

12:00- 2:30 3:30 classes 

3:00- 5:30 11:00 classes 

Wednesday, July 27 
8:00 - 10:30 Unscheduled Exams 



JULY 19, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 2 



FEATURE 



Business booming 

Activities enliven summer 
at Teacher Education Center 



By CONNIE LEDOUX 
Staff Writer 

Activities at Northwestern S tate 
University may be somewhat slim 
during the summer session in some 
departments, but at the Teacher Edu- 
cation Center, business is booming. 

Evelyn Noles is one of hundreds 
of Louisiana teachers using their 
school break to go to school. On top 
of taking regularly scheduled classes 
at Northwestern, she attended one of 
several conferences offered by the 
Department of Education. 

"I thought the School Law 
Conference was excellent. Mr. Ber- 
tran told us about past court cases that 
affect the way teachers deal with their 
students today. He also warned us 
about legal areas that effect our class- 
rooms," Noles said. 

School law, early childhood 
education, reading, math, and preven- 
tive medicine were several of the topics 
discussed in the conferences offered 
this summer by Northwestern. Fac- 
ulty members along with department 
representatives worked together to find 
top talent to talk with Northwestern 
students. For a span of usually three 



days, professionals presented infor- 
mation in their area of expertise. 

Dr. Alvin Marson helped plan 
one of the conferences. "The confer- 
ence is an important learning tool 
because students hear from the ex- 
pert The actual one-to-one contact 
the student makes with the profes- 
sional can'tbe replaced by an instruc- 
tor in the classroom. The conferences 
are also important for Northwestern. 
Students realize they can receive 
excellentresources at our university," 
Marson said. 

Dr. Kenneth Cooper came in 
from Texas to conduct a seminar on 
preventive medicine. He is pro-physi- 
cal fitness and stresses the importance 
of exercise. Cooper asked the group 
attending this summer's conference 
questions like: 

"Can you afford not to exer- 
cise?" and "Do we die or do we kill 
ourselves?" 

Cooper told students a healthy 
life is their choice. 

This summer's reading confer- 
ence offered expertise in the areas of 
comprehension, vocabulary, and rec- 
reational reading. Children's author, 
Jamie Gilson, gave away some of her 



secrets and told teachers how to latch 
onto ideas for writing children ' s books. 

During the first week of June, 
tables and sales representatives lined 
the walls of the Teacher Education 
Center. The conference on early child- 
hood education brought out educa- 
tional supply companies selling fin- 
ger paint, yarn, coloring books, and 
blocks. Teachers had a chance to 
sample the wares during breaks be- 
tween lectures. Talent came to speak 
from Massachusetts, Illinois, and Ar- 
kansas. These experts told teachers 
about new ways to recognize learning 
problems early in preschool children 
and the experts talked about new ways 
to motivate children to sit still and 
learn. 

Pam Allen, a handicapped pre- 
school teacher in Many, attended the 
conference and shopped for educa- 
tional supplies. Allen said, "There are 
so many materials these companies 
have that I have wanted to use in my 
classroom. I found out I have some 
new federal money to fund my pro- 
gram, so I am going shopping for 
school supplies." 

All of the conferences were held 
in the months of June and July and 
were sponsored by Northwestern. 



Sculpture symoblizes work 



NATCHITOCHES— A sculp- 
ture of steel magnolias which visually 
symbolizes the achievements of play- 
wright Robert "Bobby" Harling has 
been created especially for the Natchi- 
toches native by Rivers C. Murphy, 
professor and chairman of the Art 
Department at Northwestern State 
University. 

The work was commissioned by 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Harling Jr. of 
Natchitoches as a gift to their son, 
who is the author of the successful 
off-Broadway play Steel Magnolias. 
He is also the screenwriter for the 
movie adaptation, which Tri-Star 
Pictures will begin filming July 12 in 
Natchitoches with a cast that includes 
Dolly Parton, Shirley MacLaine, 
Olympia Dukakis, Sally Field and 
Daryl Hannah. 

"Approximately six months ago, 
before Tri-S tar had made the decision 
to use Natchitoches as the site to make 
the movie," said Murphy, "Bobby's 
father came to me and asked me if I 
would do a steel magnolia. I said I 
would do it, but I would like very 
much to read the play." 

At the time, hundreds of copies 
of the play were being printed for 
national distribution by a printing 
company in New York, and it was at 
least three weeks before Murphy re- 
ceived a copy of the play. 

"I read the play , and then I started 
making sketches," said Murphy. 

He added, "Mr. Harling 's intent 
with this, in discussing it with me 
when we first started the project, was 
that he and his wife wanted to do 
something as a symbol of their affec- 
tion for Bobby and their pride in his 
achievements." 

Steel Magnolias, Harling's first 
play, is based on his memories of life 
in Natchitoches, especially as a friend 
and brother to his sister Susan who 
died in 1985. 

'The play opened at New York' s 



WPA Theatre and then it came on to 
the Lucille Lortel Theatre," recalled 
Mr. Harling. "That's when I decided 
that I wanted to do something a little 
different to present to Bobby. I began 
talking to Rivers about what I wanted. 
This was before it {Steel Magnolias) 
got big. I wanted to do something, 
when the play opened at the Lucille 
Lortel Theatre, that you could put out 
in the lobby. I didn't know what I 
wanted, but I had visions of some- 
thing on a pedestal for the opening 
night there." 

Murphy completed the sculp- 
ture several weeks ago, but because of 
Bobby's commitments to the play, 
not only in New York but in Australia 
and other countries, it was difficult for 
him to arrange his schedule so he 
could return to Natchitoches. 

"The whole idea was to present 
the sculpture to him in a private fam- 
ily moment," said Murphy. "They had 
not been able to get him here. With the 
recent activities surrounding the 
movie, his obligations to the movie 
brought him here." 

During the numerous hours he 
spent creating the sculpture, Murphy 
said it was his intent to visually sym- 
bolize the mood or effect of his inter- 
pretation of the play version of Steel 
Magnolias. 

"Obviously," said Murphy, "it 
would have been simple, in the sense 
that you have got a steel magnolia, 
and the most obvious thing is to do a 
steel magnolia. But the title is Steel 
Magnolias, plural. So, instead of put- 
ting more than one large, open bloom , 
I chose to use one large, open bloom, 
and then one very, very tight bud that 
was just beginning to get its shape as 
a bud. There is also a third Utile nodule 
on the stem that represents a bloom 
that has already bloomed and the pet- 
als have fallen away, leaving nothing 
more than a little stump at the end." 

"So," Murphy explained, "there 



is the death or the ending of some- 
thing. There is also the development 
in the full bloom showing the beauty 
of something. The little tight bud that 
is about to go on its journey of becom- 
ing a bloom is sitting there represent- 
ing the rebirth of rejuvenation of the 
spirit of Bobby's sister." 

The NSU artist added, " inter- 
preted the symbolism in the play to be 
a deep family love and affection for 
Bobby's sister, especially his affec- 
tion for her. The large, open bloom is 
like her in full bloom. She really, 
really loved Natchitoches, and al- 
though she is deceased, she still lives 
through this play and through her 
association with her family, and their 
love a respect for her. Bobby wrote 
the play, and now it is about to be a 
movie. So, in essence, she is still 
blooming." 

"Mr. and Mrs. Harling are 
friends of mine and the family," said 
Murphy," and I feltan added intensity 
of wanting to do something that they 
would be pleased with, and at the 
same time would have some kind of 
symbolic relationship to the essence 
of the play that Bobby wrote and the 
essence of his sister. To Bobby and his 
family, I assume that has been 
achieved. They were so impressed 
with the sculpture. It was a real mov- 
ing experience when Bobby and his 
parents came to see it for the first time 
last Sunday." 

He added, "You always hope 
that what you do in the art world will 
touch somebody or that you will con- 
nect with other human beings in some 
meaningful way. This was a personal 
thing to me, and definitely a personal 
thing to the Harling family. Mr. Har- 
ling has said that he was so impressed 
with the sculpture. In that sense, I 
have succeeded. I am very proud that 
Mr. and Mrs. Harling asked me to do 
the steel magnolias sculpture for their 
son." 



No trip to Seoul 

NSU tracksters Brown, Starks 
fail in hopeful Olympic tryouts 



INDIANAPOLIS, IN— Brian 
Brown came up inches short and Lle- 
wellyn Starks went slip, slidin' away 
as both of Northwestern State'sOlym- 
pic hopefuls finished out of the money 
in their bid to make the United States 
Track and Field team. 

Brown, who qualified for the 
finals, wound up tenth after high 
jumping 7-5, his best outdoor mark 
since March. One of 17 jumpers in 



Saturday's finals, Brown jumped a 
total of 1 3 times before bowing out of 
the competition won by Jimmy How- 
ard of the Mazda Track Club. How- 
ard, who went 7-8, nosed out Brian 
Stanton of the Stars and Stripes Track 
Club and Hollis Conway of South- 
western Louisiana, both of whom 
cleared the bar at 7-7 1/4. 

Starks qualified for the finals in 
the long jump, placing eighth after 



Sunday ' s first round competition with 
a best effort of 26-4 1/4. On Monday 
night the conditions changed from hot 
and humid to rain and rain, limiting 
Starks' effort to 25-8, a full three feet 
behind winner Carl Lewis'28-8. "I 
could never get loose," Starks, a three 
time all-America, explained after- 
wards. Larry Myricks finished second 
at 28-3 and Gordon Laine took third 
place with a jump of 27-3 1/4. 



Featured speakers 







(Left) Dr. Roger Farr from Indiana University gave a lecture at the Teacher Education! 
Center on readingand comprehension in the classroom. (Right) Ms. Jamie Gilson, author 
of children's books and also a lecturer at the Education Center, is pictured with NSU 
professor Dr. Ben Barron. 



at 





Due to the success of this special, this offer is 
being extended through July 31, 1988. 

Wendy's Old Fashioned 
1/4 Lb. Single 



only 




with lettuce, tomato, onion, pickles, 
ketchup, mustard or mayonnaise 




Cheese 20' Extra 



IF YOU WANT A BIG 
GARDEN-FRESH 
SALAD... 




Reg. 2.79 



$ni 99 



maun 




109 Hwy. 1 South 

352-9786 




OLO l*w.M [ON CO 



HOURS: 
Sun.-Thurs. 10 a.m.-lO p.m- 
Fri. & Sat. 10 a.m.-ll p.m- 



PAGE 3 



CURRENT SAUCE 



JULY 19, 1988 



J - — 



EATURE 



Roads near film site blocked off 

Filming begins 

JEFFERSON 



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, author 
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MAP NOr 70 SC/UF 



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A Police Location 
I Street Barracade 
-» One Wo/ 





NOTICE 

Traffic patterns: 
will be altered 
temporarily due 
to filming of 
Steel Magnolias. 



MAP CURTESY OF THE 
NATCHITOCHES TIMES 
Due to the filming of Steel 
Magnolias and the volumn of heavy 
equipment needed at the site of the 
Taylor House, located at the comer 
of Jefferson St. and Poete St., the 
City of Natchitoches has changed 
the traffic patterns of several streets 
near the film site. Filming at the 
Taylor House began Monday, July 
18 and will continue through July 
30. Because of the length of time 
the crew will be at the site and the 
extensive equipment that will be 
lining the roads, various streets will 
be blocked off from 5 a.m. until 8 
p.m. each day. Once the roads are 
reopened, they will be considered 
one way streets. Residents of Poete, 
Nelken, Percy and Demeziere have 
been asked not to park along the 
streets during these designated 
hours. Police officers are on duty at 
each of the streets and barracades 
are placed during the filming. After 
filming is completed each day, the 
barracades are removed and the 
streets are open to one way traffic 
only. 



NSU sororities 
prepare for rush 




SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA-Sorority members share in 
preparing for a successful early rush at Sigma's annual 
summer workshop. Shown from left to right areJennifer 
Walsh, Sonya Rigaud, Sheila Sampite and Shelley 
McBroom. 




PHI MU-Sorority member Pam Perkins explains a few 
rushing techniques to her Phi Mu sisters, Beth Eitel and 
Tina Attaway at summer workshop in their house this past 
weekend. 



r is 



NOW OPEN 
NATCHITOCHES FORD 



1 




Steve Graf, NSU graduate and former 
Demon Assistant Football Coach, now part 
of the sales force at Natchitoches Ford. 



®l FORD 



bbO 



'Quality 
Care 
for v 
Quality 

POWE RTft AIN HARRANl r ! CaTS. 



NATCHITOCHES FORD, INC. 

780 FRONT ST. -NATCHITOCHES 

NEW HOURS: 8:00 A.M.-7:00 P.M., MON.-SAT. 

352-3677 



PAGE 4 



NEWS 



SDH 



nil ■ 



44 



Sam Goodwin" to air after fall games 



By KAREN ENGERON 
Staff Writer 

Welcome to the "Sam Goodwin 
Football Show!" 

According to Greg Burke, execu- 
tive director of the Northwestern 
Athletic Association, this line is sched- 
uled to be heard during the fall semes- 
ter on Sundays at 10:30 p.m., the day 
after each of Northwestern 's eleven 
1988 football games. KTBS-TV 3 
(ABC) in Shreveport will produce and 
air the show. 

"Channel 3 is very interested in 
working with Northwestern," said 
Burke concerning his contacting 
KTBS. 

Northwestern produced a middle- 
of-the-week football show in 1985 
out of an Alexandria station which 
was canceled. 



Burke said Northwestern came 
close to producing another football 
show in 1987, which never material- 
ized due to uncontrollable circum- 
stances. 

Each thirty minute show will 
consist of a three man camera crew 
filming on-the-field live coverage of 
the Demon football games, as op- 
posed to a studio talk show. North- 
western players will get a chance to 
comment on the game as it is in prog- 
ress; therefore, the viewer receives 
genuine emotions and reactions to the 
game whether they be positive or nega- 
tive. This on location shooting will 
also be considerate to Coach 
Goodwin's time. 

Three minute commercials will 
be allotted for each show. Various 
aspects of Northwestem's academic, 
leisure, and social interests will be 



shown. Georgia Beasley , Craig Scott, 
and Reatha Cole have helped in cov- 
ering different scenes such as Louisi- 
anaScholars' College, Northwestem's 
Shreveport campus, recruiting, admis- 
sions, available scholarships, and lei- 
sure time at the Recreation Complex 
and on Chaplain ' s Lake will be viewed. 

Channel 3 can offer a wide range 
coverage area. KTBS not only reaches 
the Ark-La-Tex in terms of traditional 
pick-up, but also can be picked up on 
numerous cable systems in Louisiana, 
East Texas, and Southern Arkansas. 
In addition to reaching the cable sys- 
tems in Natchitoches and Shreveport- 
Bossier City, Channel 3 is carried by 
cable systems in all of the following 
markets (to name only a few) - Louisi- 
ana: Many, Winnfield, Ruston, 
Coushatta, and Mansfield; East Texas 
includes Carthage, Nacogdoches, and 



NSU cheerleaders to attend UCA camp 



By DAYNA DOOLEY 
Staff Writer 

Northwestern State University's 
Cheerleaders are beginning their fall 
semester early. Starting August 1 
through 5, the cheerleaders and "Vic" 
the Demon will begin practice in 
preparation for the Universal Cheer- 
leading Association camp, which they 
will attend August 7 through 12. The 
UCA camp is held in Midland, Ten- 
nessee. 

The entire squad is very excited 
about the camp. Melody Smith said, 
"We will have the opportunity to learn 
new things and bring them back to 
NSU and put them into action!" 

Lisa Lukowski said, "Being at 
camp will be great. We'll get to see 
how the other cheerleading squads 
work together and also, we'll know 
just how our squad is doing through 
camp evaluations and competitions. 

"I'm looking forward to camp 
for two reasons," said Winston How- 
ard. 'The first reason is because this 
will be my first time at cheerleading 



camp and also we will be learning 
some new cheers, stunts, and pyra- 
mids to bring back with us to try and 
get crowd involvement during the 
games. The second reason is that I 
hear the national champions Kentucky 
Wildcats and the top five ranked 
Alabama Tide will be there. It will be 
worth it just to see them in action." 

The NSU cheerleaders also have 
positive outlooks on the upcoming 
semester. Smith said, "This will be 
my third year to cheer for Northwest- 
ern and I think that it will be the best 
year. Our squad, consisting of eight 
couples, will look more collegiate and 
we also have a 'Mic' man this year. 
He will actually get on the micro- 
phone during the games and work 
with both the crowd and the squad. 
We're also looking forward to ex- 
panding our crowd pleasers, but safety 
is always our number one precau- 
tion." 

Anne Marie Schneider said, 
"The squad is going to be really good 
this year because we' 11 get to practice 



with the same partners day after day 
and the experience for all of us will be 
great" 

"Having more guys on the cheer- 
leading squad will be a big plus," 
remarked Lukowski. "They'll be able 
to make more noise because they can 
yell louder and this year the guys are 
also stronger, which will give us the 
opportunity to try certain types of 
stunts and pyramids." 

Two people of importance to 
the cheerleading squad are Brad Ar- 
nold, squad coach and sponsor, and 
Bill Brent, Director of Bands. The 
cheerleaders are also appreciative to 
Brent for his cooperation and support 
in their building a new image of NSU 
spirit. 

The 1988-1989 Northwestern 
cheerleaders are Randy Crow, Linda 
Davis, Scott Dugas, Scott Haley, Laura 
Hatfield, Laura House, Winston 
Howard, John Kingsley, Lisa Lukow- 
ski, Carrie Moses, Bernard Pacheco, 
Jana Parker, Anne Marie Schneider, 
Melody Smith, and Steve Wolfe. 



Band scheduled to perform at NFL game 



NATCHITOCHES— The 

"Spirit of Northwestern" Demon Band 
from Northwestern State University 
has accepted an invitation to appear at 
the New Orleans Saints-New York 
Giants football game in the Louisiana 
Superdome on Sunday, Nov. 27. 

Kickoff time is 7 p.m. for the 
National Football League contest, 
which will be televised nationally by 
the ESPN network. 

BarraL. Birrcher, entertainment 
director for the New Orleans Saints, 
said the "Spirit of Northwestern" 
Demon Marching Band will present a 
six-minute pregame performance to 
the east side of the field and will also 
be featured in an 1 1 -minute halftime 
show to the west side of the Louisiana 
Superdome. 

"The New Orleans Saints are 
looking forward to having the 'Spirit 
of Northwestern' Demon Marching 
Band in our number this season," said 
Birrcher. 

The 1988 fall edition of the 
"Spirit of Northwestern" Demon 



Marching Band will showcase the 
talents of more than 240 students The 
NSU band is the second largest uni- 
versity marching band in Louisiana. 

"Our kids are very excited that 
the New Orleans Saints have selected 
our band to perform for one of their 
football games," said Bill Brent, di- 
rector of bands and chairman of the 
Department of Music and Theatre Arts 
at Northwestern. 

Brent said, "This is the first 
Northwestern band that has ever been 
invited to entertain for the Saints. It is 
a great tribute to our marching band 
program, because it focuses attention 
on the outstanding musicians and other 
talented performers who work very 
hard to present shows that are of the 
highest quality." 

The appearance by the "Spirit of 
Northwestern" Demon Marching 
Band in the Louisiana Superdome on 
Nov. 27 is a very special event, be- 
cause former Northwestern Demon 
football players are on the rosters of 
both teams. 



The former Northwestern play- 
ers currently on the two NFL teams' 
rosters are quarterback Bobby Hebert 
with the New Orleans Saints, and 
linebacker Gary Reasons and wide 
receiver Odessa Turner with the New 
York Giants. 

Membership in the "Spirit of 
Northwestern" Demon Marching 
Band has grown more than 400 per- 
cent since July of 1983, when Brent 
joined the NSU marching band pro- 
gram after serving one year as director 
of bands at Nicholls State University 
in Thibodaux. 

"Every year this band has been 
larger and better sounding than the 
previous year," said Brent, a former 
member of the famous University of 
Texas Longhom Marching Band. "We 
have been able to grow in numbers 
and to improve on the quality of our 
performers through an increase in 
scholarships for band members and 
intense recruiting of prospective stu- 
dents who are outstanding musicians." 



Writer explains "Back-To-School Blues' 



By WANDA HAMILTON 
Staff Writer 

Have you started to feel sad, 
and you don't know why? Have the 
-Activities you once enjoyed like 
goofing off, going to the movies, 
watching TV all day, and just being 
lazy started to bore you? 

It could be that you have a case 
of the END OF SUMMER-B ACK TO 
SCHOOL BLUES, hereafter known 
asBTSB. Students all over the country 
are stressfully dealing with BTSB. 

In order to find out how severe 
of a case of BTSB you have you must 
do a category breakdown of your grade 
point average. Remember, your good 
old GPA — the number that can make 
or break you as a student. 

The breakdown of your GPA 
can only fall under three categories. 
With the first being severe, the second 
being borderline mild, and the last 



group of students who have no need to 
worry. 

Now to determine and define 
the three cases of BTSB— Students 
whose GPA falls under the 0.00-1.00 
sections have a lot to worry about 
These students aren't too concerned 
with when school starts, because they 
are always on vacation. They also 
have lost the right to attend school on 
a Pell Grant. These people have the 
severe case of BTSB. They are also 
the people who hold rallies for the 
banning of all classes that require 
reading and writing. 

These students would like to 
form a college that only requires you 
to take extracurricular activities and 
receive a degree in whatever^ you 
chooseattheendoffouryears. Imagine 
the schedule they would have: Tennis 
101, Skating 201, Nap Taking 301, 
and Student Union 411. Wow, a full- 
time student. 



This next group of students have 
a mild case of BTSB. These are the 
students who study, but not when they 
should — by this I mean they wait until 
the last minute and cram like mad. 
They are the 2.00-3. 00 students, which 
is a nice category to be in, especially 



since that's where I fall. This group of 
people know when the party should 
end but don't necessarily end it They 
are socially aware of all worldly issues, 
but couldn't care less if they are not 
directly affected. 

The last group of BTSB 
sufferers are the one's who have no 
need to worry. You got it, they are the 
3.00-4.00 academically inclined 
group. This group of people go to 
summer school to get ahead. They 
read the whole book when only three 
chapters are required, and help 
everyone else out. 



Winnsboro; Southern Arkansas: Mag- 
nolia, El Dorado, Texarkana, and Pine 
Bluff. Over 201,000 households are 
encompassed by cable systems carry- 
ing Channel 3, Shreveport. On cable 
alone, the Northwestern football show 
on Channel 3 has the potential of 
reaching 703,500 people. 

The production of the show will 
cost $40,000. The Natchitoches Par- 
ish Hospital has donated $20,000, 
Magnolia Pulp Wood $2,500, and 
People's Bank $2,500. Burke said that 
there are a few good leads to where the 
remainder of the money will come 
from, but no comment as to who they 
were could be given at this time. 

Burke said,"We hope to completely 
have the show sponsored so there will 
be no financial overhead by the uni- 
versity, if not, the show will still go on 
because it is important to NSU." 



McCalla... 

continued from Page 1 

Originally from Shreveport, 
McCalla has been in town for two 
weeks. "I intend to make 
Natchitoches my residence, 
although I have been advised to 
wait until the movie is over before 
I start looking for a home." 

McCalla graduated from 
NSU in 1960 with a B.S. in 
mathematics, going on to the 
University of Northern Colorado 
to receive a M.A. degree in 
Instruction and Curriculum. She 
then received her Doctor of 
Education degree in Educational 
Administration from Texas A.&M 
in 1987. 

Serving as principal of 
Captain Shrcvc High School in 
Shreveport from 1979 to 1988 
brought her many honors and 
awards, including the titles of 
Louisiana High School Principal 
of the Year for 1987 and Caddo 
Educator of the Year in 1984. 
Under McCalla's leadership in 
1983,CaptainShreveHigh School 
was designated as a Model School 
by the United States Office of 
Education and in 1985, she was 
presented with the National 
Association of Secondary School 
Principal's Outstanding Principal 
Award. 



NEEDED: 

Writers, 
photographers, 
Sports Editor 

for fall 
Current Sauce 
Contact: 
Tom Whitehead, 
103 Kyser, 357-5213 
or 

Sony a Rigaud, 
357-5456 




Sponsored 
by 

SAB X _ MAS 

in 
JULY 

at NSU Rec Complex 

July 21, 6 pm-10 pm 

Free food and drinks! 
Bathing Suit and 

Tanning Contests nsu id required 





LISA 
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"extra' 
[forth wi 
erience 



Doe: 



Members of Le Cercle Francais will be tutoring students taking French cours 
in the fall. The one-time S20 fee will be put into the French Club account 
provide cultural experiences for its members. For more information, conts 
Dr. E. Rubino in the Language Department or Leah Luck, secretary. 

There will be a blood drive Wednesday, July 20, in the Student Union Ballrooi 
The first 100 donors will receive free movie passes compliments of Parkw 
Cinema. For more details, see signs posted in Student Union. 



ALVIN DOL1EUX, R.PH. 



BOBBY WAGGONER, R.PH 



UNIVERSITY PHARMACY 
AND GIFTS 



Insid 
IheC 
Noi 



— ~ 926 College Avenue, Natchitoches LA 71457 

352-9740 

After Hours:352-4923 
or 352-4246 



Hours:8a.m. to 6p.m. 
Monday-Saturday 



"A Cut Above 

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352-9216 



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Open Mon.-FrL, 8-5:30 



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2 Pair for the Price of 1 

Buy any pair of Bausch & Lomb 
Soft Contact Lens and 
the Second Pair is Free ! 
Where? 

The Vision Exchange 



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318-352-1056 

, Call for appointment 
J M-F 9am-5pm Sat. 9am-3pm 

walk-ins accepted, contact lens fittings 
by appointment only 

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Natchitc 



PAGE 5 



CURRENT SAUCE 



JULY 19, 1988 



Editorial 

r * 

- lJ l TSA DARDEN 
===~3tf Writer 

Packing away my 1988 North- 
jiem viewbook, I mean yearbook, 
jipsed back through my memories 
jie past three years here in Natchi- 
fbes- . 

Needless to say, my stay has 
ft interesting. I've learned a little 
Hjt Louisiana and herpeople. (Yes, 
s any other out-of-stater I expected 
jm dance every Saturday night 
li lots of Thibodeauxs and Cajun 
4. I've since learned that north 
nisiana is a lot like south Arkansas 
B y home state.) 

Although I was awarded a de- 
eat Northwestern, I also received 
'extra" education free of charge, 
"extra" education was on people. 
Northwestern "learning" includes 
lerience with people which is a 



nice thing to have under your belt in 
the real world. They say it takes all 
kinds and here at Northwestern we 
have all kinds. 

Yes, it has been an interesting 
three years and I believe I'll chalk it 
all up to experience. But I'm not here 
to editorialize on changes that need to 
be made. I'm just here to say goodbye. 

First of all I'd like to say fare- 
well to the "people-people" at North- 
western. Many times these are the 
folks that work hard behind the scenes 
with little recognition. These people 
are the ones that help keep 
Northwestern 's reputation of being a 
"friendly campus" alive and well. 
Although I know I'm overlooking 
some, these are the ones I've had the 
pleasure of knowing. Top of the list is 
Clothilde in the Student Union. This 
lady knows all the students and is 



Does Natchitoches feel Growing Pains? 



chcours 
account 
>n, conu 

y- 

Ballrooi 
if Parkw 



page 94 



R, R.PH 



Inside: po894S 
r/?e Golden Girls 
North Louisiana 



1457 

1- 4923 

2- 4246 




Summer 1988 



Why OA,; 



Jeopard 



!0pm 



10:00am 

Same Show What 
fcartoonist Damian 
' Domingue has placed 
himself in. (until Tri-Star 
leaves) 



• French Revolution 

wmentary Shirley 9:fJ0am 
riame reenacts 15,000 Qne sixty-seven 
her previous lives in this , . T .. ' 
rtingdocu-drama; She n," n ° 

,uite convincing as both h c „ c- , 

I XVI „nH m! Schisophrenic Sally Field 
finds out that she's earring 
a baby for one of her 
personalities, meanwhile 
she must find a way to 
break it to herself that she 
had been having affairs 
lytwie Drama Can ou with herself when she ran 
»ss who doesn't star in away alone to Hong 
one? Kong.(lhr) 



uis XVI and Marie 
toinette, not to mention 
guillotinist. ft ZbrsJ 

1:00pm 

» Young and the 
eastless 



The Price Is Right 

(Game Show Match wits 
fith producers and 
directors in an attempt to 
get the most rent for your 
house. Remember to buy 
new sheets, and please, 
have your pet spayed or 
jieutered. ( 1hr) 

Zagney and Spacey 

' Crime Drama A dog and 
his partner, (Daryl 
Hannah) investigate a 
cover-up involving a 
presidential candidate: 
Olympia-gate.(7/w; 

11:00am Julia Robert* 
Telethon Film Festival 

telethon The only to-date 
complete and 
unexpurgated version of all 
her work to be shown 
continuously. After the 
films Ms Roberts plans to 
tap dance and baton twirl 
to "I Am The Greatest 
Star". The telethon is to 
benefit the young star's 
support group for unknown 
actors: W.H.A.T.? 
(Who the Hell Are They?) 
(15m in) 



The Current Sauce staff 
would like to 

wish everyone 



Good Luck on finals 





actually concerned with how they are 
doing. She finds a kind word to say to 
everyone and makes meal time a pleas- 
ant experience. You can also add Paula 
Robertson, Mrs. "C", James Meadors, 
Daisy Bolton, James Jefferson, Gla- 
dys Woodson, Cleveland Presley and 
Bobbie Jackson to the list. These 
people take an interest in students and 
the time to visit with them . They make 
the stay at Northwestern a personal 
one. 

Some other folks worth men- 
tioning who are fun (and informative) 
to visit with include Gwen Keran, 
Mildred Moore, Charlene Vails and 
again, James Meadors. I (and Rich- 
ard) have enjoyed the visits. 

And what about those who do 
even further behind the scene work 
that is not recognized unless some- 
thing is amiss. For example theclean- 



ing and the grounds crew. I've en- 
joyed going to school on a clean and 
beautiful campus. 

It's also nice to go to a school 
that runs well physically — for ex- 
ample air conditioners that cool and 
heaters that heat Many thanks to Loran 
Lindsey, his staff, and some of trie 
ones I know personally such as Bob 
Matthews, "Brose," Johnny and Bill. 

Moving to the forefront, I'd like 
to recognize some folks who not only 
do their job, they do it well and with 
pride. For example Darlene Rachal 
and her staff in the Bookstore (finally 
MY opinion on the matter). Although 
the Bookstore was under a lot of heat 
this past year, Darlene and her staff 
kept their heads (and spirits) up and 
they now have a top-rate store that 
collects oooohs and aaaahs from those 
who enter. Good work. 



Another department worth 
mentioning is James Taylor and his 
crew in Iberville. Working for ARA, 
James not only takespride in his prod- 
uct, he also takes the time to know the 
students and find out what they want 
and like. For the first time since I've 
been here, I have heard students choose 
Iberville over the Student Union caf 
(especially this summer). Good job 
Taylor crew. 

Another area — Photographic 
Services. Working with Don Sepul- 
vado and his staff means working 
with a knowledgeable and efficient 
crew. Thanks for all the extra help. 

And of course, my favorite of- 
fice on campus — External Affairs. 
Hopefully, as students, you will get 
the opportunity to meet Elise, Loree 
and Joe before you become alumni. 
Elise James runs the placeand is about 



Writer addresses editorial 
about student athletes 



Anger arouses personal invitation 



Dear Editor, 

Two weeks ago, a Current Sauce 
writer named Wanda Hamilton wrote 
an article addressed to Northwestern 
State University athletes on the im- 
portance of education to a college. I 
fully agree with the basic idea of the 
article, but I totally disagree with the 
way it was presented. 

First, the opening statement to 
the article was "Free boarding, free 
tuition, numerous excused absences 
from class, lots of practice, and in 
many cases, no college degree at the 
end of four years..." Ms. Hamilton, I 
hate to burst your bubble, but you 
don'tgetsomethingfornothing. Being 
a college athlete is like having a job. I 
have to be at practice everyday, rain, 
sun.orsnow. Ifldonotperformtomy 
coach'sexpectations, I would lose my 
job and my money to attend school. I 
feel that you have never been a col- 
lege athlete and so therefore you never 
did the things we athletes must do. 

I took Journalism in high school 
and was Sports Editor in my senior 
year. I was always taught that you 
must research an article before writ- 
ing it. It seems you, Ms. Hamilton, 
have forgotten that one important 
lesson. At least 45% of NSU athletes 
are on the honor roll and another 35% 
have a 2.0 or above average. 

Also, to write an article like this 
a person must really understand the 
things an athlete must do every day. 
In other words, "don't talk about how 
short the desert is until you walk it 
beside me." 

Another misconception you 
seem to have, Ms. Hamilton, is that all 
athletes are, as you say, mostly black 
males only in it for the so-called fame 
of being a college athlete. Well, as a 
black female athlete, Ms. Hamilton, I 
would not be here if I did not have my 
athletic abilities as is the same for 



most college athletes. I would like to 
give you some examples of what goes 
on in the athletics part of NSU. 

First of all in football: every 
time a person puts on a football uni- 
form and nlavs on the field, he risks 
the chance of death or permanent in- 
jury. Do you voluntarily risk death, 
Ms. Hamilton, to attend school? No, 
I don't think so. 

Baseball is next. If a bad pitch 
going 80 miles an hour hits a player in 
the head or face, it could cause death 
orpermanentinjury. Basketball play- 
ers are not as serious — you might just 
break your leg or bus t your head open . 
Track is mostly the same as basket- 
ball. 

I know that we take risks every 
day in life, but these risks are taken by 
students who want an education and a 
future in life who may not have had it 
if they didn't have a sports scholar- 
ship. 

So to give you the benefit of 
that, you are human and do make 
mistakes. 

I personally invite you to attend 
Northwestem's preseason football 
camp where you can practice two times 
a day, or if you are lucky, three times 
a day, in close to 100-degree weather 
with full pads. The camp starts on 
August 7. 

Ms. Hamilton, you paint a col- 
lege athlete's life as a big party, but 
it's not. I am an athletic trainer at NSU 
also. You have not felt or seen the 
pain that I have. You have not hurt so 
bad for weeks that you could not sleep. 
You have not been so tired every day 
to where you have to force yourself to 
stay awake to study. All of this just to 
have some fun to let you tell it, Ms. 
Hamilton. I think not 



Yette" James 



Write a letter to the editor 



ile 



1 



Current Sauce 




lie 




The CurrenrSaucekpubiisTTedweeklyduringthe 
fall and spring semesters by the students of Northwest- 
•< r t State University of Louisiana. It is not associated 

any of the University's departments and is fl- 
(Wced independently. 

The Current Sauce is based k\ the Office of 
Sclent Publications located in Kyser Halt. The office 
£|the editorial staff is 225H, telephone (31 8) 357-5456. 
^adviser's office is 103 Kyser Half, telephone 357- 

The mailing address for the Current Sauceis P.O. 
*>* 5306, NSU, Ncrtchltoches, LA 71497. 

All correspondence, includtna letters to the edi- 
0r is welcome. Material submitted for consideration 
j[»ust be mailed to the above address or brought to 
office. 

The deadline for all acrvertisernentandcojt>yis3 
f> nn, each Friday. Inclusion of any and all material is 
' 6ft to the discretion of the editor. 

Letters to the editor should be typed (double- 
™ced), signed and should Include a telephone 
^mber where the writer can be reached. No anony- 
mous letters will be printed. 

Current Sauce subscription rates are ST1 per 
>Qdemic year (28 issues) or $6 per semester (14 
^ u es). The paper is entered as second-class mail at 
."■atchitoches. LA. The USPS number is 140-660. 



LISA DARDEN 
H. SCOTT JOLLEY 



SONYA RIGAUD 
Editor 

KAREN ENGERON 
CONNIE LEDOUX 
LEAH LUCK 
Stuff Writers 

ALLEN EVANS 
Advertising Manager 



JOHN TABOR JOE ROBERTSON 
Photographers 

DAMIAN DOMINGUE 
Cartoonist 

EDD LEE 
Circulation/Distribution 

STEVE HORTON 
Graduate Adviser 

TOM WHITEHEAD 
Adviser 



DAYNA DOOLEY 
WANDA HAMILTON 



Summer '88 



one of the most down to earth folks I 
know. Loree Shirley is one heckuva 
lady that is the calming force of the 
office. And Joe Edmonds is probably 
the best bookkeeper on campus. If 
you haven'tmetthem yet, you need to 
take the time. Thanks for being a 
positive factor for me at Northwest- 
em. I'm sure gonna miss y'all. 

Oh well, time to pull out of town. 
No doubt there are many good folks at 
Northwestern that I've overlooked 
(and a few bad apples that I've over- 
looked on purpose). Thanks to those 
who have made mine and Richard's 
stay at Northwestern a more pleasant 
experience (and also thanks to those 
who have made it a rocky one — I've 
learned what to be wary of in people.) 

It's been an educatin ' three years . 
Thanks for the learnin'. 



Current Quotes 



Are you having any second 
thoughts about early rush? 




Holley Methvin, <X>M 
Cottonwood Falls, KS, 2-1 

"I feel that an early rush 
allows the sororities to devote 
themselves more to the Greek 
system. It also allows the rushees 
to be more involved in all the 
campus activities without con- 
flicts. I'd like to encourage 
everyone to go through rush and 
see what Greek life is all about." 




Sheila Sampite, 111 
Natchitoches, 2-1 

"Yes. Some high school 
girls are not interested in joining 
the Greek system because they 're 
not really sure what Greeks are 
and what they stand for (even 
with the pamphlets they receive). 
With normal rush, these girls 
come to school, say no, but then 
get talked into it after all. Early 
rush stops these last minute sign- 
ees." 






PatWyatt,nr 
Natchitoches, 4-1 

"Early rush could very well 
be an asset to NSU if properly 
advertised throughout the new 
freshman class." 



Kent LaBorde, 0X 
Mansura, 2-1 

"With rush being a week 
before classes, I don't expect a 
large rush, but I'm still optimis- 
tic about a large pledge class." 





Mary Miller, IK 
Natchitoches, 3-1 

"In order for the first early 
rush to be successful at North- 
western, the present students at 
NSU must be informed of the 
new change. This will be the 
only problem with the students 
that participate. I feel open rush 
will be much more effective." 



Damian Domingue, KA 
Lafayette, 3-1 

"Definitely. It seems as if 
the Greeks had little to say about 
it in the first place, though. I'm 
just concerned about what kind 
of response we're going to have, 
that is, in terms of rushees." 




John Tabor, KI 
Natchitoches, 2-1 

"Early rush is going to be a 
challenge, but with our new frat 
house and well over 60 active 
members, we are very optimistic 
about the turnout of fall rush." 



I H| | 



JULY 19. 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 6 



CAMPUS LINE 



Russell Hall to house classrooms 

Scholars' College receives new home 



By LISA DARDEN 
Staff Writer 

The 1988 fall semester will 
greet Louisiana Scholars' College 
students with a new Northwestern 
home. 

Temporarily housed on the 
second floor of Ky ser Hall, the Schol- 
ars' College will begin its second year 
of existence in a home of its own 
Russell Hall. 

Located on the hill across from 
the columns, Russell Hall contains a 
wealth of educational history at North- 
western. Constructed in 1936, Russell 
Hall was built to serve as Normal 
State College'snew library. The State 
Board approved $150 thousand for 
the library. 

Upon its completion, the li- 
brary filled the open side of the quad- 
rangle of buildings on the hill formed 
by Caldwell Hall, Warren Easton and 
the science building. Normal's library 
was a modified Tudor-Gothic build- 
ing of red brick consisting of a base- 
ment, first floor and semi-attic. The 
reading room located on the first floor 
accommodated 300 students. For the 
next 34 years, students attending col- 
lege at Natchitoches would spend 
many hours studying in the library. 

Constructed during President 
Fredericks' tenure, the library's name 
became a topic of debate. Fredericks 
wished to name the building after his 
friend and mentor, Superintendent 
T.H. Harris. However, Louisiana 
Governor Richard Leche wanted the 
library named after himself. Attend- 
ing the May 1937 graduation ceremo- 
nies and building dedication, the 
governor proudly conferred degrees 
and certificates on 250 Normal gradu- 
ates from the steps of the Richard 
Leche Library. 

In 1957, under the term of 
President Kyser, the library, now 
known as Russell Library, underwent 



expansion and renovation. The ex- 
pansion was only a portion of Kyser' s 
physical plant improvements to keep 
abreast of increasing enrollments and 
demands. The building served as li- 
brary until the early 70s when Watson 
Memorial Library was constructed and 
all books and publications were moved 
from Russell Hall. In the late 70s and 
early 80s, Russell Hall underwent yet 
another renovation during President 
Bienvenu's tenure. 

Since serving as a library, 
Russell Hall has housed a variety of 
classrooms and activities including 
KNWD radio station, NSU Entertain- 
ers and the industrial technology (IT) 
program. The IT program moved to 
Williamson Hall at the beginning of 
the summer term. Russell Hall was 
also used as storage space. 

At the end of the spring 1988 
term, the decision to make Russell 
Hall the Scholars' College home was 
made and work on readying the build- 
ing began. University employees 
removed stored items from the build- 
ing and began "cleaning house." 

Working under a tight budget, 
according to Scholars' College Direc- 
tor Dr. Grady Ballenger, the building 
is being given an internal facelift with 
only necessary repairs being made. 
Facelift projects include cleaning, 
repairing plaster and painting. 

"We are stretching the Ameri- 
can dollar as far as a bucket of paint 
will go," said Kim Johnson, Scholars' 
College administrative assistant. 
Johnson is overseeing the preparation 
of Russell Hall for the Scholars' Col- 
lege. 

Johnson said only university 
employees and materials are being 
implemented in the Russell Hall proj- 
ect in order to keep spending at a 
minimum. All work is being com- 
pleted in-house. Work is also being 
limited to the first and second floors 



which the Scholars' College will 
occupy. 

When complete, Russell Hall 
will house all of the Scholars' College 
facilities including faculty offices, 
classrooms, computer and reading 
room and student lounge. Another plus 
for the move to Russell Hall is the 
proximity to Boozman Hall. Boozman , 
which houses female Scholars' Col- 
lege students, is located directly across 
the street from Russell Hall. 

"There is room for us to grow 
over there which is what we need," 
Johnson said of the move. Ballenger 
said he expects the number of students 
in the program to increase this year to 
400, including a large new class of 
freshmen. 

Although more extensive re- 
pairs will be needed to make the build- 
ing picture perfect, the Scholars' 
College is excited about obtaining a 
place of their own for the school year, 
Ballenger said. Long range plans, 
including updating the heating and 
cooling system and renovating the au- 
ditorium, have been placed on hold 
until state monies to fund the projects 
can be obtained. 

Johnson said one of the overall 
plans for Russell Hall is to furnish the 
building with original pieces. "W£>are 
looking for the old, wooden furniture 
that was originally in Russell Hall," 
Johnson said. Johnson has been look- 
ing through the university warehouse 
and storage places for the original 
pieces and has met with moderate 
success. 

Work on preparing Russell Hall 
is hoped to be completed prior to the 
Aug. 20orientation session, Ballenger 
said. 

In addition to receiving a new 
home, the Scholars' College will also 
have a new director for the 1988-89 
year. Following the decision of Dr. 
Stan Chadick to return to the class- 



Formerly a library, the historic Russell Hall will now be used to hold classes for the 
Louisiana Scholars' College in the fall. The building was constructed in 1936. 



room last spring, Ballenger was named 
to fill the spot. Ballenger' s director- 
ship became official July 1. 

In addition to serving as direc- 
tor, Ballenger is an associate profes- 
sor of English and American litera- 
ture. He received his A.B. from the 
University of North Carolina atChapel 
Hill, his M.A. from Columbia Uni- 
versity and his Ph.D. from the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina. Ballenger's 
interests include not only 19th and 
20th century American literature, but 
also film theory and criticism. 

New to the staff are Dr. Jean 
D'Amato, associate professor of clas- 
sics, and Dr. Nathan Therien, assis- 
tant professor of history. 

D'Amato, B.A. Tufts Univer- 
sity, M.A. Middlebury College and 
Ph.D. the John Hopkins University, 
comes to the Scholars' College from 
Stanford University's Intercollegiate 
Center for Classical Studies. She has 
also served as program officer for the 
National Endowment for the Humani- 
ties. 

Therien, A.B. Stanford Uni- 
versity, A.M., Ph.D. Harvard Univer- 
sity, comes to the Scholars' College 
having held teaching positions at 
Denison University, Kalamazoo Col- 
lege and the College of Wooster, all 
members of the Great Lakes Colleges 
Association. 

Establishedbythestate'sBoard 
of Regents in 1987, the Louisiana 
Scholars' College will continue to 
offer a comprehensive program of 
honors study in the liberal arts and 
sciences. The Scholars' College will 
join the history of education at North- 
western in their new home on the hill. 

(Historical information for this 
article was obtained from Marietta 
LeBreton's book Northwestern State 
University of Louisiana 1884-1984: 
A History.) 



NATCHITOCHES— The 
United States Achievement Academy 
announced that Kim M. Pattan has 
been named a United States National 
Collegiate Award winner in business. 
This award is aprestigious honor very 
few students can ever hope to attain. 
In fact, the Academy recognizes less 
than 10% of all American college 
students. 

Pattan, who attends Northwest- 
ern, was nominated for this national 
award by Dr. T. Jackson, a professor 
at the school. Pattan will appear in the 



United States Achievement Academy 
Official Collegiate Yearbook, pub- 
lished nationally. 

"Recognizing and supporting 
our youth is more important than ever 
before in America's history. Cer- 
tainly United States Achievement 
Academy Award winners should be 
congratulated and appreciated for their 
dedication to excellence and achieve- 
ment," said Dr. George Stevens, 
Executive Director of the United States 
Achievement Academy. The Acad- 
emy selects USAA winners upon the 



exclusive recommendation of profes- 
sors, coaches, counselors, or other 
school sponsors and upon the Stan- 
dards of Selection set forth by the 
Academy. The criteria for selection 
are a student' s academic performance, 
interest and aptitude, leadership quali- 
ties, responsibility, enthusiasm , moti- 
vation to lean and improve, citizen- 
ship, attitude and cooperative spirit, 
dependability, and recommendation 
from a professor or director. 

Pattan is the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Masino. 



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2 PIECE MEAL 

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9 PIECE MEAL 

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This coupon good for 9 pieces of Original Recipe, 
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combinations only. Customer pays all applicable 
sales tax. Offer expires July 31 , 1 988. Good only at 
Many and Natchitoches. 



AUGUST 30, 1988 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 
OF LOUISIANA 



VOL. 77, NO. 5 



Tabor discusses possible changes in registration 



MICHELLE WEEGO 
imaging Editor 

Lin da Tabor, Northwestern State 
jiversity's Registrar said many 
anges in registration procedures 
ere being discussed after many new 
id transfer students experienced 
fiiculties during fall registration held 
jst week. 

The largest majority of com- 
ts during registration came from 
Uy or transfer students who had to 
ait in line for schedules or drop/ 
ids. 

The students who had the least 
loblems were definitely the 1700 or 
jwho pre-registered. All they had to 
jwas pick up their bill and pay," said 
abor. 

"I believe we (NSUadministra- 
on) really did a good job in helping 
ush people through with only limited 
roblems," stated Tabor. "Our big- 
difficulty was moving the com- 
uter center from the fourth floor of 
[yser Hall to St. Denis. We were 



expecting an additional power to be 
added to the mainframe which would 
boost our system up but found out that 
Northwestern won't receive it until 
next spring. However, spread through- 
out next year we plan to incorporate a 
modernized software system which 
should simplify things. Also, along 
with the move there came about minor 
kinks that we didn't have a chance to 
work out before registration began." 

Tabor also stated that there were 
a few problems with holds. "Students 
who left unpaid parking tickets and 
library fines last semester found they 
had to go pay the fine before they 
could register. That made students 
who had been standing in line for 
hours pretty upset" 

"One setback during registra- 
tion that I believe is a fabulous prob- 
lem to have was the increased enroll- 
ment. We were using an old computer 
system with a greater number of stu- 
dents than we expected and that slowed 
us down a bit," said Tabor. 



"We are growing wonderfully 
in the number of full-ume students 
that we have. And we are also gaining 
more students who are ready to take a 
heavier class load," said Tabor. "That 
also means more problems with drop/ 
adding classes." 

Because of the increased num- 
ber of students, many department 
heads added classes at other hours to 
keep the class numbers relatively 
small. Most students filled classes at 
popular hours early so later register- 
ing students found they had to juggle 
schedules to fit in classes from the 
added hours. 

After observing these problems 
which slowed registration, Tabor is 
able to discuss many suggested 
changes for next semesters registra- 
tion. 

One major plan being disc ussed 
is a summer orientation for entering 
freshmen. "This will allow us to 
explain what registration is about and 



give us time to possibly get the major- 
ity of our new students pre-registered. 
If this works we may try something 
like that with our transfer students," 
said Tabor. "All this also adds up to 
more personal attention between the 
incoming students and their advisors." 

In the past, the registrar has 
worked with faculty in making class 
schedules early so students could be 
prepared for pre-registration. Also 
students know what to expect when 
they come up to register and there 
won' t be as many drop/add problems. 
A helpful hint in registering is to use 
the alternate schedule section of the 
registration card. If a student has an 
alternate schedule handy then finding 
out one of the classes he wanted is 
closed won't be that much of a prob- 
lem. 

"Students just have to under- 
stand that they all can't take classes at 
10:00am. Some arejust going to take 
subjects at 8:00 a.m. and during lunch," 
said Tabor. 



"As far as students discovering 
holds in the computer during registra- 
tion, we are trying to find a way to 
alleviate the run-around students must 
do to remove them," said Tabor. 

"Right now, when a students wants to 
remove a hold, he or she must pay the 
Cashier in Roy Hall, take the receipt 
to the department responsible for the 
hold, then that department must take 
the measures to see that the hold is 
removed. What we'd like to do is see 
the hold removed from the student's 
chart the immediate moment the fee is 
paid." 

"My 'bigpush' is for continuing 
students to pre-register. I know a lot 
of students don't take the time or just 
don't have the money to do it at the 
end of a semester. We hope to help 
that situation by merely taking the $25 
charge onto the pre-registered 
student's fee sheet," said Tabor. 

"We also have plans to stretch 
registrationoutalitdebitlonger. With 
the unexpected number of students 



that showed up we found we were 
running greatly behind schedule. We 
pushed back part of the schedule and 
also asked the Scholars' College to 
wait the end of registration before 
they began. The students and faculty 
of Scholars' College were very help- 
ful with this and it saved us time and 
trouble as much as it did them," said 
Tabor. 

"With all these changes in the 
planning we hope to have an easier 
time of registration. Our main con- 
centration lies in pre-registering fresh- 
men, getting continuing students to 
pre-register and seeing what can be 
done about drop/add problems. Ev- 
eryone has to understand that not only 
are we registering on the main campus 
but also in Shreveport, Fort Polk and 
England Air Force Base," said Tabor. 

"I would like to take this time to 
thank KNWD for helping us out so 
much during registration. They kept 
the people standing in line entertained 
by their interviews and by giving out 
the free cokes." 



Early rush triggers 

S maii response Fraternities complete 
\ early rush with mixed emotions 



C CAROLINE WARD 
iffWriter 

Something exciting began to 
ippen on Thursday, August 18, here 
Northwestern. The Greeks on 
mpus and those people wishing to 
in in the Greek way of life, as- 
mbled to begin another year of rush 
Jivities. Rush is a time during each 
mester that allows the potential 
reeks, or rushees, to meet with the 
reek members through a series of 
m-alcoholic parties. Rushees are able 
ichoose which fraternity or sorority 
fey would like to join. 

Rush was a little different this 
«ar. For the first time in 
orthwestem's history , it was decided 
atan early formal rush would occur, 
ormal rush began three days before 
gular campus activities. Early rush 
used several mixed emotions among 
^fraternities here on campus. Many 
f the fraternity members feel that 
iving an early, formal rush limited 
cir number of new pledges. 

Shawn Bailey , vice-president 
^Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity said, 
I' hurts us to have an early rush 



because we have a small school. Later 
on, three years from now, it [rush] 
might start working this way , but right 
now it is not, and it's hurting us. We 
are getting all of our guys through 
open rush." 

Jonathan Tabor, rush chairman 
of the Kappa Sigma fraternity said, "It 
kind of hurt us right now because 
there wasn't as many people coming 
through; but we won't really know 
until we see what open rush is going to 
do." 

Kappa Alpha Order president 
Randy Crow said, "There wasn't re- 
ally that many guys that came through, 
but we knew that there wasn't any- 
thing that we could do about it, so we 
just did the best that we could, and it 
worked. We got the largest pledge 
class." 

Bill Veulman, rush chairman for 
the Sigma Tau Gamma fraternity, 
added, "The early, formal rush only 
benefited the larger fraternities, be- 
cause they were better prepared. We 
are going to concentrate on open rush." 

Another complaint that most of 
the fraternities had in common was 



that early rush was too disorganized; 
due mainly to a lack of support from 
the administration. 

Bailey said, "We have a non- 
Greek administration that is trying to 
force the Greeks to do certain things 
when they do not understand what it is 
like to be Greek. They should have 
given us a few months to prepare for 
it, because it was a totally new con- 
cept. They threw it onto us too quick." 

Dan Medlin, Chapter Consult- 
antfor KappaSigma, said, 'The Inter- 
fratemity Council was totally disor- 
ganized, and the rush advisor was 
undirected. Eighty guys started out, 
and only sixty remained eligible. That 
means that twenty guys just gave up, 
and that shows you how bad it was 
right there." 

There were a few good points to 
early formal rush. In the words of 
Shawn Bailey,"I like the idea because 
now I, along with the other actives in 
my fraternity, can go ahead and get 
started with classes. The rush chair- 
man takes care of it from here." 

According to Randy Crow, 
"Early rush separated the guys that 



were really interested in the Greeks, 
and the smaller groups allowed us to 
meet them on a more personal basis." 

Veuleman brought out the fact 
that freshmen were slightly helped by 
attending the early rush activities. It 
gave them a head start on meeting 
people, and by the time the first day of 
classes rolled around they had made 
friends. 

All of the fraternities requested 
that a list of pledges not be published 
until after open rush is completed, 
because they are still getting new 
pledges. As far as figures go, Tau 
Kappa Epsilon expects to receive 24 
pledges from the combination of for- 
i mal and open rush, Kappa Sigma Order 
expects to have a total of 23 pledges, 
Theta Chi anticipates ten pledges, 
while Sigma Tau Gamma expects an 
approximate total of 15 pledges. 
Kappa Alpha had the most pledges in 
formal rush with 26 new pledges. They 
expect to choose around 15 more 
during open rush. 

Jonathan Tabor summed it all 
up in the true Greek spirit by saying,"I 
think it is going to go pretty well. " 




Keeping time with the rest of the band, members of 
the "Spirit of Northwestern" practice intently. For 
more on the NSU band, see page 8. 



Sorority rush successfully bids 144 ladies 



LAURIE LeBLANC 
offWriter 

Early sorority rush doubts were 
Anguished with the arrival of 185 
^cipants August 23. Many soror- 
members were previously pessi- 
^lic about the number of rushees 
Sting up for early rush. 

Formal fall rush commenced 
•Ursday with an orientation program 
'Plaining the social and financial 
tects of sorority life at Northwest- 

Following the orientation pro- 
a "Meet the Greeks" dance pro- 
the rushees an opportunity to 
tl better acquainted with the sorority 
^Hen. 

The week was composed of four 
in each house. They were open 
° Us e, mini-theme party, theme party 
^Preferential tea. 

Different themes consisted of 
Mu's "A Chorus Line", Sigma 
*Ppa's "Hard Rock Cafe" and Tri 
'Sma's "Camp Sigma." 

"The three sororities participat- 
underwent major party changes as 



an attempt to update and polish their 
previous parties," said Reatha Cole, 
Panhellenic advisor. 

Another change from previous 
years was the scheduling of parties in 
the afternoon instead of late evening. 

"The scheduling of parties in 
the afternoon made voting and deco- 
rating a much easier task although 
heat was a bit of a problem," said 
Kirsten Gemhauser, membership 
education director of Sigma Sigma 
Sigma Sorority. 

Kim Wilson, president of Phi 
Mu Fraternity, credits Panhellenic for 
the success of an early fall rush. 
"Panhellenic worked very hard to 
recruit girls who were interested in 
sorority life from the beginning," 
Wilson said. 

"Rush has been a great success," 
said Tina Anderson, Sigma Kappa 
Panhellenic delegate. "We have 
gained new sisters and strengthened 
the bonds within our sororities." 

"Rush Week" came to a close 
August28 with the issuing of bids and 
Panhellenic pledging. 



Bids were issued to 144 ladies. 
They are as follows: 

Phi Mu — Melissa Bearb, Ali- 
son Bexley, Jennifer Bridges, Viki 
Brunt, Debbie Caple, Dawn Cole- 
man, Kristie Davis, Maria Dobernig, 
Leeann Eitel, Dawn Ethridge, Tracy 
Favrd, Amy Claire Gimber, Alissa 
Hansen, Leah Ann Hennigan, Kristen 
Hicks, Laurie House, Karen Kennedy, 
Ashley Knotts, Kristy Kron, Keli 
Lamothe, Nicole LeBlanc, Leah Linn, 
LisaLukowski, Christy Lusk, Jeanine 
Lutes, Catherine Mahoney , Kimberly 
McKinney.KristenMcMillen.Renee 
Michel, Virginia Mix, Janna Parker, 
Janet Perry, Jenny Prudhomme, Lisa 
Richards, Ann Marie Schneider, 
Wendy Shutt, Jo Jo Smith, Candace 
Statt, Dana Townsend, Shannon Trigg, 
Caroline Ward, Bridget Wilcoxen, 
Melissa Womack, Tonya Wood, 
Angela Woodle. 

Sigma Kappa — Monica Billiot, 
Claire Bouton, Jennifer D'Aquin, 
Charmaine Decker, Julie Duggan, 
Nicole Eagleston, Jill Edmonson, 
Crystal Everett, Rebecca Hall, Pamela 



Harmon, Laurie Lacour, Karen Mid- 
dleton, Pam Miller, Brenda Nicker- 
son, Wendy Stephenson, Sara Tinker, 
Heather Tippett, Jo Ann Williams. 

Sigma Sigma Sigma — Janelle 
Ainsworth, Teresa Andrews, Paulette 
Basco, Lori Bemont, Shelly Benson, 
Kathryn Bienvenu, Shannon Bouf- 
fanie, Beth Bowman, Stephanie 
Causey, Charmin Chance, Amy 
Childers, Alison Conner, Gloria Doll, 
Denise DeVille, Suzanne Fulton, Gina 
Gobble, Carrie Gordon, Elizabeth 
Gowland, Mary Claire Harkins, An- 
drea Harrington, Donna Kirk, Staci 
Klotzbach, Anjanetle Lee, Jennifer 
Leone, Elizabeth Lindner, Laura 
Martin, Janna Masson, Elizabeth 
McDavid, Ann Miller, Tara Mondello, 
Tammie Nolen, Karen Norris, Penny 
Patten, Margaret Perot, Martha Perot, 
Amy Pietch, Mary Porth, Rhonda 
Regouffre, Katie Roy, Christiana 
Ruth, Leigh Ann Tabor, Stacey Taff, 
TaraTietzen, Nicole Tujaque, Wendy 
Walters, Jennifer Whitford, Brook 
Williams, Kimberly Young. 



Roemer to speak at NSU 

NEWS BUREAU— Gov. Buddy Roemer will be in Natchitoches on 
Thursday, Sept. 1 , for addresses at Northwestern State University , the Lou- 
isiana School for Math, Science and the Arts and to members of local civic 
organizations. 

Roemer will speak at noon at the Holiday Inn during a combined dutch 
treat luncheon meeting of civic clubs, professional organizations and other 
community groups. He is expected to discuss the upcoming special legisla- 
tive session and highlights of the recent regular session. 

The governor's address at Northwestern is scheduled for 1 : 15 p.m. in 
the Fine Arts Auditorium of the A. A. Fredericks Creative and Performing 
Arts Center. Northwestern faculty, staff and students are invited to attend 
the meeting, which is also open to the general public. 

Roemer will address students and faculty of the Louisiana School for 
Math, Science and the Arts at 2 p.m. That meeting is scheduled for the 
school's main auditorium. 

During the addresses at Northwestern and the Louisiana School, 
Roemer is scheduled to discuss issues relating to both higher education and 
public education at the elementary and secondary levels. 

The governor's speaking engagements in Natchitoches will mark his 
first appearance here since May, when he served as featured speaker at 
Northwestem's spring commencement exercises. 

Anativeof Bossier Parish.Roemerbecamegovemor-electin October 
after a first-place primary finish that led to the withdrawal of the incumbent 
governor, Edwin Edwards, who finished second in the election. 

Roemer began his public service career in 1972 when he was elected 
as a delegate to the Constitutional Convention. He was elected to Congress 
from the fourth District in 1980 and was reelected three times without 
opposition. 

He is a 1964 graduate of Harvard University in government and eco- 
nomics and received a master's degree from the Harvard Business School 
in 1967. 



SAB Fre-Game Party 

3:30-6:30 
Saturday, September 3 

Prather Coliseum 
Featuring the Insatiables 



AUGUST 30, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 2 



* 



NEWS 



NEWS 



Current Sauce recaps summer events 



By SONYA RIGAUD 
Editor 

Natchitoches has often been 
thought of as being a dull town, espe- 
ic cially during the summer. This sum- 
mer proved to be a welcome change 
for the residents of Natchitoches and 
the students of Northwestern State 
University. 

The Current Sauce summer is- 
sues contained plenty of news for its 
,• readers. The following is an overall 
. look at some of this summer's activi- 
ties for those students who did not 
attend summer school. 

□Natchitoches was finally cho- 
: sen as the film site for the Rastar 
: Production of Steel Magnolias which 
: is to star Sally Field, Dolly Parton, 
: Shirley MacLaine, Olympia Dukakis, 
Daryl Hannah and Julia Roberts. 
□More than 9,500 people an- 
: swered the open casting calls held 
June 16-18 and June 20 hoping to be 
; discovered as extras in the production 
: of Steel Magnolias. Tom Whitehead 
:^said of one of the casting sessions, 
"It's one of the biggest crowds in the 
history of Northwestern for a non- 
athletic event" 

□The official Steel Magnolias 
press conference was held on Tues- 
day, June 28 at Northwestern's Stu- 
j :dent Union Ballroom. Jerry Pierce of 
I ;the News Bureau opened the confer- 
ence followed by comments from 
;jParton, Field, MacLaine, Dukakis, 
^Hannah, Roberts, Director Herbert 
I &oss and Producer Ray Stark. Along 
with approximately 100 members of 
the local and statewide press(including 
the California-based Entertainment 
Tonight), several local dignitaries were 
present. 

□Due to the filming of Steel Ma g- 
nolias and the volume of heavy equip- 
ment needed at film sites, various roads 



around Natchitoches have been 
blocked off during filming and marked 
one way streets after filming is over. 

□The Louisiana Sports Hall of 
Fame, which was established in 1958 
by the Louisiana Sports Writers Asso- 
ciation to honor outstanding athletic 
figures inducted 1 1 of the most cele- 
brated athletes and coaches in the 
state's history on June 25 at North- 
western. Inductees were football greats 
Archie Manning, Terry Bradsha w and 
the late Tommy Davis, LSU national 
football champion coach Paul Diet- 
zel, Olympic track gold medal win- 
ners Willie Davenport and Rod 
Milbum, long-time Northeast Louisi- 
ana basketball coach Lenny Fant, 
major league pitching star J.R. Rich- 
ard and basketball standouts Elvin 
Hayes, Bill Reigel and Greg Procell. 

□Northwestern's first news 
broadcast aired Wednesday , J une 8 on 
Channel 2. The broadcast was created 
and produced by students and fea- 
tured changes at Northwestern during 
the 1987-88 year. The show's format 
included such changes as dorm reno- 
vations, enrollment, Scholar's Col- 
legeand sports facility improvements. 

□Northwestern's pitching staff 
had two of its members pitching in the 
minor leagues this past summer after 
both Kenny Morris and Bob Kairis 
were selected in the major league draft 
on Thursday, June 2. Morris was the 
22nd round selection of the Houston 
Astros and Kairis went in the 23rd 
round to the Cleveland Indians. 

□The Northwestern Media 
Board announced its selection of four 
students to head student media here 
on campus. Scot Jenkins was selected 
as general manager for the campus 
radio station, KNWD-FM. Gynger 
Ingram was chosen to become the 
editor of Northwestern's literary 
magazine, Argus. Tina Dutile was 



selected as the editor of the Potpourri, 
Northwestern's yearbook, while So- 
nya Rigaud was selected as editor of 
the campus newspaper, Current Sauce. 

□Northwestern pitcher Bob 
Kairis joined outfielder Dickey Marze 
on the Southland Conference first 
team, while pitcher Bob Ayo and 
second baseman John Surane were 
honorable mention. 

□A group of 11 high school 
students from the Bordeaux region of 

France came to Natchitoches July 2- 
27 to participate in a "home stay" 
program to expose them to the Ameri- 
can way of life and historically-rich 
cultures of the South. 

□Various coaches of North west- 
em conducted several summer camps 
for basketball, softball and football. 
Coach Don Beasley's basketball camp 
ran June 26-30, Coach James Smith's 
Lady Demon basketball camp ran July 
17-21, Coach Rickey McCalister's 
Lady Demon softball camp ran June 
26-30 and Coach Sam Goodwin's 
Demon football camp ran July 10-13. 

□Northwestern tracksters Lle- 
wellyn Starks and Brian Brown quali- 
fied for the United States Olympic 
Trials. Each competed in the Track 
Athletics Congress Seniors mee on 
June 16-18 in Tampa, Fla. 

□Kappa Sigma Fraternity com- 
pleted its new home at the beginning 
of June. The eight bedroom house is 
located at the corner of Jefferson and 
Caspari across from Chaplin's Lake. 

□The Division of Leisure Ac- 
tivities and Recreational Sports opened 
its marina located on Sibley Lake for 
students to utilize ski boats, sailboats, 
windsurfers, canoes and paddleboats. 

□Major reconstruction contin- 
ued on Vamado, one of the oldest 
residence halls on Northwestern's 
campus. 



□Pat's Economy Store an- 
nounced that they would begin selling 
textbooks, causing com petition for the 
NSU Bookstore. 

□Assistant basketball coach 
Wayne Waggoner's contract with 
Northwestern was not renewed for 
unspecified reasons. 

□The Louisiana Folklife Cen- 
ter at Northwestern State University 
presented the ninth annual Natchito- 
ches-Northwestern Folk Festival July 
15-17 in Prather Coliseum. 

□Louisiana Scholar's College 
student Damian Domingue performed 
"a one-man musical cabaret" entitled 
"Putting It Together" at 
Northwestern's Theatre West on July 
13-14 and 16-17. 

□Louisiana Repertory Theatre 
series tickets went on sale July 1. 
Performances are scheduled for the 
fall semester. The productions are 
Romeo and Juliet, Anna Christie, 
Noises Off, I'm Not Rappaport and 
The Dickens Christmas Carol Show. 

□Northwestern began an inter- 
nal investigation of possible NCAA 
rules violations by he"ad basketball 
coach Don Beasley regarding recruit- 
ing and payments to players. Beasley 
was later dismissed. 

□Dr. Sandra McCalla was cho- 
sen to serve as the new head of the 
Department of Education on campus. 
McCalla graduated from Northwest- 
em in 1960. 

□The Northwestern Computer 
Center was moved to St. Denis Hall. It 
was then used during this fall's regis- 
tration. 

□New Orleans Saints quarter- 
back Bobby Hebert appeared on a 
poster promoting parenthood educa- 
tion. The poster is a marketing tool 
designed to attract more males to the 
parenthood education courses offered 
in high schools. 



Leis 

President Alost to SCFVfi Divisior 

ACTIVITIES--. 

as state representative 'SS 



NATCHITOCHES— Dr. 
Robert A. Alost, president of North- 
western State University, has been 
selected to serve as the state represen- 
tative for Louisiana in the American 
Association of State Colleges and Uni- 
versities. 

The selection of Alost, who will 
assume the role in the fall of 1 988, was 
announced by Dr. J. Larry Crain, sys- 
tem president of Louisiana Board of 
Trustees for State Colleges and Uni- 
versities. 

The presidents of the nine insti- 
tutions governed by the Board of 
Trustees met recently in Baton Rouge 
to successor for Dr. Joseph B . Johnson, 
president of Grambling State Univer- 
sity who had served as the AASCU 
state representative for Louisiana. 

Headquartered in Washington, 
D.C., the AASCU has a membership 
of more than 350 state colleges in uni- 
versities with a total enrollment of 
over two million students. 

During the past two decades, the 
AASCU has continued to stress de- 
veloping multi-purpose comprehen- 
sive regional institutions and construc- 
tive planning for the future in response 
to changing needs of education and 
society. Effective higher education 
leadership in the 1980's currently is 
oneof the association major concerns. 

Since Alost became president of 
Northwestern on July 1, 1986, the 
foundation for Northwestern's future 



^tivities, events 
/isure Activitie 

growth has been laid with strong ertj^ another excit 
phasis being placed on the recruii Asforfacil 
ment of quality students from through ReCreati ° n bml< 
out the state and the retention of jjjai" 6 " 50 " 1 ' wiln 
derclassmen. ping-pong table 

Evidence of the stability an assortmer 
has been brought to Northwester^ 11 ^ mforma 
during the Alost administration is ^ fnendl y con 
fact that NSU has enjoyed enrollme^ ,oom . 1S alm0St 

increases every session since the ter/" 1011011 38 a ^ l 
of 1987. card room with 

Northwestern had the j^leasantatmospl 
undergraduate enrollment increase i ^ r 
its history last fall, a 16.9 percent in 
provement which was also the large; 
reported by any college or universin 



tri 7 

in Louisiana for the fall term of 1981 N f* iL O 



Before becoming 
Northwestern's president, Aloj 
served from 1982 until 1986 as tijBy EDDIE BR] 
founding director of the houiswfitaff Writer 
School for Math, Science, and th 
Arts, the first residential high schoc The beginn 
in the nation for gifted and talente#emester has she 
students in mathematics, science, agents in and an 
the arts. Scholars' College 

Alost came to Northwestern JRussell Hall, the ; 
1963 as a faculty member in tljfaculty members 
Department of Health and Physicist of courses, tl 
Education. He later served from 196tege is already lo 
until 1975 as chairman of the depart This year's 
ment and from 1975 until 1982 ^college's mov 
dean of the College of Education. ]of Kyser Hall to < 
He holds the bachelor's anRussell Hall. M 
master's degree from Northwesteijind renovation 
and the doctoral degree from Louis 
ana State University in Baton Rouet . • 



Aaaaayyy, Fonzie, 
you're the greatest! 



KNWD-FM develops new format 



By MINDY BECK 
Staff Writer 

KNWD, Northwestern's radio 
station, is now completely Album 
Oriented Rock (AOR). Attempting to 
gain publicity and to promote their 
new format, the station did remote 
broadcasts the Monday and Wednes- 
day of registration. During the up- 
coming semester, KNWD will try to 
do as many remotes as possible. The 
volunteer station ' s disc jockeys are 50 
percent returning workers and 50 
percent newcomers. 

"We had a few people working 
here al 1 summer long to get the station 
ready to go on the air," said General 
Manager Scot Jenkins. Jenkins likes 
being general manager because it gives 
him administrative experience in 
running a radio station. 

KNWD is planning many events 
in October, or Rocktober as they call 



it The events will be held during the 
weeks of Homecoming and State Fair. 
The radio station has several specialty 
shows such as: Classical Rock and 
Roll Show on Monday nights 6-9; 
Power Trax (Heavy Metal), Thursday 
nights 6-9; Progressive Block, Satur- 
day noon-6; Easy Listening, Sunday 
mornings 6-9 a.m.; Christian Show, 
S unday mornings 9-noon; and the Jazz 
Show, Sunday afternoons noon-3. 

In terms of listeners, Jenkins 
thinks that this year will be the best 
because of their more insistent format 
and professional sound. "Our main 
goal is to let people on campus and the 
surrounding area know that we're on 
the air and exist," said Jenkins. KNWD 
is one of the few college rock stations 
in the nation. 

News Director Jeff Zeringue has 
a very structured format for the news 
and he will be covering all of the 



Demon home football games. "The 
goal of the news director is to inform 
the listeners of important information 
dealing with Northwestern and the 
surrounding areas, including state 
news," said Zeringue. 

"I want to give the news staff as 
much practical experience as they can 
handle. So that when they do pursue 
a job in Journalism, they'll be aware 
of how to do news, what problems 
come up and some of the decisions not 
found in the textbook that have to be 
made," Zeringue said. He expects a 
confident and qualified news depart- 
ment which can continue and improve 
and not fall by the wayside. 

Bill "Rabbit" Scheinder, the 
personnel director, "hopes to give new 
and old staff members a representa- 
tion of what the radio station is all 
about." 




SG/ 
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By MINDY BE 
Staff Writer 




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PAGE 3 



CURRENT SAUCE 



AUGUST 30, 1988 




Leisure department explains student facilities and programs 



ye 



PVC DIVISION OF LEISURE 
ACTIVITIES-- After a most success- 
lid 1987-1988 year, where over 4000 
jtudents participated in 28 different 
jctivities, events, and happenings, the 
^isure Activities department is ready 

tro •J"' anolner exciun 8 y^ 31 - 

n genr As for facilities, the Intramural/ 

u^^kecreation building now houses a 
n through • . , . . ■ 

ion of J 8106 room ' Wlln tw0 P°°l tables, two 
ping-pong tables, a fooseball table 
.... jud an assortment of videogames, as 
th well as information bulletin boards 

.- • uid friendly conversation. The blue 
itionisth* • , . , . A A •„ 
nroll J°° m 1S ^ most completed and will 

•ethe ji inction ^ a 9 u * et 31-63 ^ 

card room with stereo music and a 
tie pleasant atmosphere. 

increase 
ercent irn 
the largej 
universil 
m of 1981 
ing 
nt, Aloi 

?86asutBy EDDIEBRIGGS 
Louisw\Staff Writer 

s, and th 

igh schod The beginning of the 1988 fall 
id talentekw iester nas shown many improve- 
;ience,aijiien ts m ^ around the Louisiana 
Scholars' College. With the move to 
western JRussell Hall, the addition of four new 
jer in tpculty members, and a redesigned 
d Physicist of courses, the future of the col- 
from 19<£ge is already looking brighter, 
the deparj This year's summer term saw 
il 1982 ijiecollege's move from their old home 
ication. ;tf Kyser Hall to a partially renovated 
elor's anRussell Hall. More complete repair 
rthwesterand renovation of the 52 year old 
am Louisi 
ton Rougi - 



The new IM/REC Weightroom, 
located in the basement of the build- 
ing, will be supervised Monday-Thurs- 
day, Saturday and Sunday from 3-5 
p.m. and 7-9 p.m., and is open to all 
Northwestern personnel; four racquet- 
ball courts are also located in the 
basement of the building as well as a 
gymnastics tumbling area, and there 
is the IM Gym where students play 
basketball, volleyball and badminton 
whenever the urge strikes. 

ThelMbuildingis open 72 hours 
a week, 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-Thurs- 
day, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. on Friday, 2-6 p.m. 
on Saturday, and 2-9 p.m. on Sunday. 
To use the facilities you must present 
a current ID card. 



The IM/REC building also has 
an equipment checkout room where 
students with an ID Card can check 
out anything from fishing poles to 
horseshoes to board games to a vari- 
ety of athletic equipment 

Other facilities include the 
canoe shed, which is open from 2:30 
to 5:30 p.m., six days a week (every 
day but Friday), down on Chaplin's 
Lake, where students can check out 
sail boats, canoes, wind surfers and 
pedal boats with their student ID card. 

The Northwestern campus has 
somebeautiful open field areas, ROTC 
and Intramural Fields, where the stu- 
dents can practice golf, play soccer, 



rugby, football and softball through- 
out the year. 

The REC complex pool area is 
open until October 2 (Monday-Friday 
2-6 p.m. and Saturday-Sunday 12-6 
p.m.) and the golf course and tennis 
courts are open year round. The 
Pavilion is open for student parties 
and gatherings anytime throughout 
the year. 

The Intramural Program, one 
aspect of the Leisure Activities De- 
partment, offers a structured, com- 
petitive based program for all Greeks, 
dormitory students and independents. 

During the fall semester, activi- 
ties that people can now start practic- 
ing for include the Intramural Swim 



meet which will be held at the Recrea- 
tion complex on Wednesday, Sep- 
tember 7 at 3:30 p.m. The entry 
deadline for the Swim Meet is Mon- 
day, September 5. All students, fac- 
ulty and staff are encouraged to enter 
either as a team or individually. 

The Flag Football Officials 
Clinic will begin Wednesday, Sep- 
tember 7 at 7 p.m. in the IM/REC 
Building. All students who are inter- 
ested in becoming an Intramural Sports 
Official should contact the IM office 
and plan to attend the clinic. 

Flag Football will kick off on 
Thursday, September 15 with a Flag 
Football Jamboree. The entry dead- 
line for all Flag Football teams is 



Monday, September 12. Teams may 
be entered by coming by the Intramu- 
ral office. A mandatory team captains 
meeting will be held Wednesday, 
September 14. 

The Leisure Activities Depart- 
ment also sponsors a variety of special 
events. The first of these events for 
the fall semester will be the second 
annual IM Beach Day. IM Beach Day 
will be held on Saturday, September 
17 from 1-4 p.m. All students, faculty 
and staff are invited to participate in 
an afternoon of pedal boating, wind 
surfing, canoeing, sailboating, volley- 
ball , horseshoes, frisbees, sun and fun ! 



Scholars' College benefits from improvements 



building will come later, when state 
funding for the project can be ac- 
quired. Although work on Russell 
Hall is far from completed, the bene- 
fits of the move are quickly becoming 
obvious. According to Don Barker, 
academic counselor, Russell Hall will 
not only serve as a special academic 
building, but also as a central gather- 
ing place for faculty and students alike. 
This year's curriculum has also been 
changed to include several new 
courses. The Core Seminar has been 
redesigned and renamed as "Texts 
and Traditions: The Shaping of 
Western Thought." Professors Keller, 



Holmes, Ryan and Phifer have merged 
their collected knowledge to create 
"Paradigms of Nature: An Introduc- 
tion to Scientific Inquiry," an inter- 
disciplinary course covering topics in 
both mathematics and science. 

While exact numbers have not 
been determined, there are approxi- 
mately 300 Scholars' College students 
enrolled this semester. Of those 300, 
approximately 200 are first-semester 
freshmen. In addition to this year's 
new and continuing students, the fac- 
ulty was also joined by four new 
members: Nathan Therien, Jean 
D'Amato, Curtis Phifer and Janet 



Sturman. All four hold Ph.D.'s in 
their chosen fields and will be great 
assets to the college. Everyone in- 
volved in the college is very excited 
about all the changes and new faces 
appearing this semester. "Both the 
new students and faculty members 
bring with them talent, energy and an 
enthusiasm which will make the Schol- 
ars' College an overall better experi- 
ence," said Barker. 

All things considered, the Schol- 
ars' College seems to be off to a great 
startforthe 1988-1989 academic year. , 




SGA ends extremely 
productive summer 




>r 

son 



By MINDY BECK 
Staff Writer 

Members of Northwestern 's 
Student Government Association 
(SGA) has many things to keep them 
busy in the upcoming semester, ac- 
cording to Michael McHale, presi- 
dent. 

McHale, who feels the SGA had 
an extremely productive summer, is 
looking forward to a exciting fall. In 
Addition to his SGA work, he lobbied 
for higher education in Baton Rouge 
and tried to lower tuition this summer. 

Upcoming services to arrive on 
campus include an automatic telling 
machine on campus, courtesy of 
Peoples Bank. A student phone book 
listing all of the dorm students phone 
numbers will be distributed in acouple 
of weeks. Also, a Voters Registration 
Drive has been planned for the fall. 
McHale is working on a closer rela- 
tionship with the city of Natchitoches 
and Northwestern State University. 
"It's obvious Northwestern is on its 
way to becoming one of the finer 



institutions of higher learning in the 
state," stated McHale. "This year's 
freshman class is a good indication of 
that. It'saveryintelligentclass. These 
are the kind of people we want to get 
involved in organizations. They are 
the movers and shakers and they'll be 
a vital part in making Northwestern 
number one." 

Several appointed positions, from 
Spring Court Justices to members of 
the Spirit Committee, are still open. 
"Anyone interested is encouraged to 
stop by and we'll put them to work," 
said McHale. Any students having 
problems with dorms or who want to 
get involved should talk to the Senator 
of the Student Government Associa- 
tion, Von Klotzbach. 

McHale has a few things up his 
sleevefortheStateFairGame. "We're 
going to make the football game be- 
tween Northwestern and Northeast the 
greatest rivalry in Louisiana College 
Football," quoted the SGA President. 
"It's gonna be a fantastic year for 
Student Govemmentand all of North- 
western." 




NSU's Party Place 
Wednesday Nite 

The Mixx 
Long Island Iced Tea-$1 
Thursday Nite 
$4 Beer Bust-All Nite 

Friday Nite 
Margaritas & Coronas 
$1 from 8 to 12 



SAB 

Anyone interested in working 
on the Public Relations and Advertis- 
ing Committee of the Student Activi- 
°es Board should go by the SAB of- 
ice in the Student Union Thursday at 
1:00 a.m. 

SGA 

The Student Government Asso- 
Cl ation is sponsoring a workshop 
Wday September 3, from 10:00 
J*, to 2:00 p.m. in the President's 
im of the Student Union. Anyone 
"Crested in becoming involved with 
Jta SGA is welcome and encouraged 
attend. For more information call 
3 S7^t50l. 

Kappa Alpha Order 

Kappa Alpha will be holding an 
"Pen rush party for all gentlemen inter- 
red in pledging on Friday Septem- 
^2 from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the KA 
Mansion on the hill. No alcohol. 

Scholars' College 

The Student Life Committee of 
"te Louisiana Scholars' College is 
fPonsoring a series of "talk-shows" to 
* held monthly beginning Septem- 
^ r 19. The first topic will be manda- 
!*y drug-testing in the workplace. 
0r more information contact a 
^mber of the Student Life Commit- 
^ or call the Scholars' College at 
357^579. 



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AUGUST 30, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 4 



NEWS 









EDITO 



KA f s attend national convention 



By BETH BOWMAN 
Staff Writer 

In mid-August while most stu- 
dents were attempting to enjoy their 
last pre-school days, a group of young 
men were already planning for the 
new school year. These men have met 
for 43 years in cities across the coun- 
try, including St. Louis, Richmond, 
and Memphis. They have seen the 
sights from San Francisco to Wash- 
ington, D.C., with stops in New Or- 
leans and New York to mention a few. 
They have discussed common prob- 
lems, considered new solutions, and 
thought of new directions to go in. 
For 43 years these men have met in 
the middle of August for Kappa 
Alpha's National Leadership Institute 
and on August 1 2 - 1 5 met in Clearwa- 
ter, Florida. 

National Leadership Institute 
traditionally holds workshops on rush, 
pledge education, chapter leadership, 
and scholarship. Seminars on chapter 
finances, risk management, inter- 
fraternal relations, and relations with 
the host college were also held. A 



special session was held this year in 
which undergraduates were given the 
opportunity to speak with profession- 
als in various fields about the world 
after graduation. Chapter leaders were 
able to met the elected officers for- 
mally and informally, and the tradi- 
tional awards banquet was held to 
honor chapter accomplishments. 

The weekend began with regis- 
tration on August 12. Throughout the 
weekend, the KA's heard from uni- 
versity officials, business profession- 
als, and leaders in the fraternity world, 
the closing session was held Monday, 
August 15 at noon. Kappa Alpha's 
newest tradition.thefirstannual Kappa 
Alpha Open Golf Tournament, was 
held immediately following the clos- 
ing ceremonies. All proceeds from 
the Open were donated to the Kappa 
Alpha Order Educational Foundation, 
which funds programs such as NLI, 
scholarships, the national headquar- 
ters, and chapter development pro- 
grams. 

From the Gamma Psi chapter of 
Northwestern State University six 



Kappa Alpha members attended NLI. 
They are David Wolfe, undergraduate 
chairman of White Providence; Randy 
Crow, president; Bobby Cockrell, 
vice-president; Butch Poteet, record- 
ing secretary; Damian Domingue, 
corresponding secretary; and Brett 
Harris, social chairman. Tommy 
Whitehead, faculty advisor, was also 
present 

The delegates broughtback their 
experiences in order to improve their 
chapter. Kappa Alpha revised their 
fall rush for 1 988 with the information 
from NLI, and it was apparent with 
their new 26 member pledge class, the 
largest of any fraternity's formal rush. 

When asked about National 
Leadership Institute, Damian Domin- 
gue replied, "I feel that I have bene- 
fited tremendously from NLI. It was 
automatically gaining 600 fraternity 
brothers from all parts of the country 
who had the same obstacles as you 
did. By talking to brothers from other 
chapters, we received insight as how 
to solve some of these problems." 



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jie comparison ti 
ut let's face it, 
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lien back to the < 



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OPEN 24 HOURS 

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krgi 

Argus, Nor 
tulti-media maf 
irst staff meeting 
o Thursday, Sc 
oom 313 of Ky 
oses of this me 
hose interested in 
lie magazine an< 
or the the fall cc 
All full timi 
rary interest are 
his meeting. Arg 
ery small staff 
omes student in] 
Argus publi 
ssays, artwork, 



5 



Cu 



The Cur 
;fall and spring 
ern State Uni 
with any of 
nancedinde 

The Cu 
Student Pubi: 
Of theeditori< 
The adviser's 
5213. 

Themai 
Box 5306, NS 

All corr€ 
for is welconr 
ftiust be mail 
the office. 

The dec 
P.m. each Fr 
left to the dis 

Letters 1 
spaced), sig 
number whei 
rtious letters 1 

Current 
academic y 
issues). The p 
Natchitoche 



PAGE 5 



CURRENT SAUCE 



AUGUST 30, 1988 



EDITORIAL 



What do NSU students fear most? THE LINE! 



R.PH. 



~ « BRAD BODENHEIMER 

It used to be Hitler's Nazi Ger- 



.457 

ours: 
23 or 
46 



jjny, cancer and NSU registration, 
''oday it's nuclear holocaust, AIDS 
0(1 NSU registration. Whatarethese 
^rible horrors? They are the three 
(jngs Northwestern students proba- 
cy fear the most — although not nec- 
$sarily in that order. 
' Okay, some of you might feel 
^comparison to be a little dramatic, 
tt t let's face it, THE LINE is just 
redible. Some people stand in it for 
jur or five hours or more, trying to 

Stotk out their schedule. Then, once 
ou' re finally at the computers, you 're 
jcky if you get your classes at all. 
jod forbid if you have a hold or some 
iher reason to be sent elsewhere and 
ken back to the end of THE LINE. 



krgus editor requests staff 



I 



1 : <<■■> 



Everyone has their own horror 
story that is just a little worse than 
everyone else's about registration. 
Even pre-registered students end up 
having to fight their way through THE 
LINE sometimes three or four times. 
Why should such a relatively small 
university be having so much trouble 
with its registration process? 

Well, classes are canceled or 
times changed; as one group is just 
getting into line the next group is 
arriving; drop/adds are frantically 
effected after scheduling requests are 
denied. Added to these is the fact that 
there was a greater number of new 
students to enroll than had been esti- 
mated. 

But all the blame does not lie 
with the university itself. NSU did 
make some improvements in the sys- 



tem. They moved the computer cen- 
ter from Kyser to the more convenient 
St. Denis. They centralized the fee 
payment area inside the Student Un- 
ion Ballroom . They offered free Cokes 
to those unfortunate souls who waited 
in THE LINE out in the hot sun. Plus, 
pre-registration was offered strictly 
for Freshmen at a specific time last 
year, but very few students took ad- 
vantage of it This is where the stu- 
dents are at fault. Not enough people 
take out the half-hour or hour that pre- 
registration requires. 

So what can be done to improve 
the registration process even further? 
First of all, the students have to do 
their part and pre-register. It is so 
much more convenient for everyone 
involved than is standing in THE 
LINE. Also, there would be fewer 



registrants at the beginning of the 
semester, thus chopping away at THE 
LINE. An influx of unexpected stu- 
dents would not have such a dramatic 
effect if most old students were pre- 
registered. Pre-registration was in- 
corporated by NSU in order to help 
students. Now, students, help your- 
selves. 

The university must play a big 
role in improving the process. A Drop/ 
Add room, where students who need 
only to drop or add a course can go to 
to avoid THE LINE, must be created. 
To stand in line forever needing only 
to change one or two courses and then 
find those courses closed once you get 
to the computers can be heartbreak- 
ing. A Drop/Add line would be shorter 
and faster for these students. It would 
also alleviate the congestion at the 



Argus, Northwestern 's literary/ 
| julti- media magazine, will have its 
rst staff meeting of the fall semester 
a Thursday, Sept. 1 at 1 1 a.m. in 
Dom 313 of Kyser Hall. The pur- 
oses of this meeting are to inform 
lose interested in staff positions about 
ie magazine and to set the deadline 
the the fall contest. 
All full time students with a lit- 
lary interest are warmly invited to 
meeting. Argus has always had a 
ery small staff and therefore, wel- 
omes student input 

Argus publishes poetry, fiction, 
ssays, artwork, photography, and 



even one-act plays. The magazine 
offers the student a creative outlet as 
well as a chance to become involved 
on campus. Staff members will take 
part in reading and determining the 
quality of manuscripts, selecting 
which of the best pieces to include in 
the magazine, computerized produc- 
tion of the magazine, proofreading, 
illustrating, and much more. Argus 
sponsors one contest each semester, 
usually awarding prizes for the best 
fiction, poetry, and cover design. 

Although staff members are not 
paid in dollars, working with Argus is 
a rewarding and worthwhile experi- 



ence. Also, a new editor must be 
found to replace me upon my gradu- 
ation in May . The selection will proba- 
bly be made from the staff, since a 
minimum of one semester of service 
to the magazine is required to qualify 
for editor. 

Those who cannot join us on the 
staff are invited to submit their crea- 
tive work. Argus is a quality publica- 
tion which represents the best literary 
and artistic talents of Northwestern. 
Won ' t you please come be a part of it? 

Gynger Ingram 
Argus Editor 



There will be a 
Current Sauce 
staff meeting 
on 
Tuesday, 
August 30 
at 
5 p.m. 
225 Kyser 



5eeDicMf NSU 




-see Dic^odrr^nL 



DoLLy wake 

Spot pquft" 





panf, p<mf 
Spot-/ 



Write a letter to the editor 



Current Sauce 



The Current Saucete published weekly during the 
.fall and spring semesters by the students of Northwest- 
ern State University of Louisiana. It is not associated 
with any of the University's departments and is fi- 
nanced independently. 

The Current Sauce is based h the Office of 
Student Publications located in Kyser Hall. The office 
of the editorial staff is 225H, telephone (31 8) 357-5456. 
The adviser's office is 103 Kyser Hall, telephone 357- 
5213. 

The mailing address for the Current Saucete P.O. 
Box 5306. NSU, Natchitoches, LA 71497. 

All correspondence, including letters to the edi- 
tor is welcome. Material submitted for consideration 
fnust be mailed to the above address or brought to 
the office. 

The deadline for all advertisement and copy is 3 
P.m. each Friday. Inclusion of any and all material Is 
'eft to the discretion of the editor. 

Letters to the editor should be typed (double- 
spaced), signed and should hctude a telephone 
number where the writer can be reached. No anony- 
mous letters will be printed. 

Current Sauce subscription rates are $ 1 1 per 
academic year (28 issues) or S6 per semester (14 
issues). The paper Is entered as second-class mail at 
Natchitoches. LA. The USPS number is 140-660. 




SONYA RIGAUD 
Editor 

MICHELLE WEEGO 
Managing Editor 

MINDY BECK SHANNON BOUFFANIE BETH BOWMAN 
EDDIE BRIGGS De ANN A COCHRAN H.SCOTT JOLLEY 
LAURIE LeBLANC ELIZABETH McD AVID CHRIS McGEE 
BRIAN McPHEARSON ANN MILLER CAROLINE WARD 
BRAD BODENHEIMER 
Staff Writers 

TIM JOHNSON CHARLOTTE RUSH 
Photographers 

DAMIAN DOMINGUE 
Cartoonist 

TOM WHITEHEAD 
Adviser 



ALLEN EVANS 
Advertising Manager 



ED LEE 
Circulation/Distribution 



Fall '88 



computers as students try to rearrange 
their schedule after some of thQir 
course requests have been denied. 

Next, space out the registration 
times for alphabetical groups. If it 
means starting earlier and finishing 
later, so be iL A mere hour between 
times simply isn't sufficient. Finally, 
the university must avoid class can- 
cellations and time changes if at all 
possible. How can students confi- 
dendy and effectively pre-register if 
they know their classes might be 
changed or canceled over the semes- 
ter break? Some changes are inevi- 
table, granted, but if an instructor 
commits to a certain time, have him or 



her stick to it. This is Northwestern 
State University — "Where the stu- 
dents come first" Remember? 

The administration has indeed 
made many improvements in the reg- 
istration system since last year, but we 
must not stop here. We must continue 
to seek ways to make the system more 
convenient for everyone. Hopefully, 
someone will remember that students 
do come first and soon THE LINE 
will lose its claim to fame. But, let us 
all remember, Northwestern and its 
students must work together. 




What did you think of 
registration this semester? 




Carl Landry 
Franklin 

Freshman, Psychology 

"It was tedious, but all it 
takes is patience. You have to 
get through it. It's as efficient as 
it can be." 



Von Lambert 
Pickering 

Freshman, Education 

"It was more convenient 
when it was held in the Student 
Union. Wedidn'thavetowaitin 
long lines. There was more 
room." 




Lajuana Franklin 
Alexandria 

Senior, Fashion Merchandis- 
ing 

"It went smoothly for me 
because I have pre-registered." 



Jeff Johnson 
Pineville 

Sophomore, Psychology 

"It was a bitch and unnec- 
essarily complicated." 




Kevin D. Hopkins 

Belle Chasse 

Senior, Public Relations 

"Registration went well for 
those who pre-registered; how- 
ever, for those who did not pre- 
register, it was quite a night- 
mare. A line which, at times, 
stretched fifty yards outside and 
then a two to three hour wait 
inside, but the company was 
good." 



Stephen Sivo 
Jacksonville, FL 
Grad Student, Clinical Psy- 
chology 

"I thought it was com- 
pletely disorganized. I found 
myself having to come back and 
tie up loose ends like my meal 
ticket." 




AUGUST 30, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 6 



WELCOME NSU STUDENTS 



NEWS 



Versatile Ray Charles to play here 



By DeANNA COCHRAN 
Stqff Writer 

Ray Charles, the legendary 
"genius of soul," will be presented in 
concertonWednesday,September28, 
at 8:15 p.m. at Prather Coliseum at 
Northwestern State University. Char- 
les, who will be joined by the seven- 
teen-piece Ray Charles Orchestra and 
his "little darlings," the Raelettes, will 
be the opening attraction of 
North western's new Cultural Events 
Series. The concert is being co-spon- 
sored by the Natchitoches-North west- 
em Symphony Society. 

This September is a special 
month for Ray Charles. Not only does 
Charles celebrate his fifty-eighth birth- 
day this September, the month also 
marks his forty-third year as a profes- 
sional musician. Charles, who now 
records exclusively for CBS Records, 
began his recording career for the 
small Los Angles-based Swingtime 
label with "Confession Blues" in 1948. 
Ray Charles then went on to his first 
major hit "I've Got A Woman" in 
1955. Over the next two years, he 
claimed 1 more Top 1 R&B record- 
ings. 

Ray Charles proved himself to 
be a very versatile performer. After 
conquering the musical fields of both 
rhythm and blues, and jazz, he went 
on the excel in pop and country. In 
1976, Charles took on George 
Gershwin 's Broadway musical "Porgy 
and Bess." This led Ray to such "easy 
listening" standards as Rodgers and 
Hammerstein's "Some Enchanted 
Evening" and "Oh What A Beautiful 
Morning." Ray Charles' talents even 
spilled over into ballet. Charles per- 
formed with the New York Ballet in 
"A Fool For You" at Lincoln Center. 
This ballet, choreographed by Peter 
MartinstoaselectionofCharles' most 
popular tunes, granted Charles the dis- 
tinction of being one of the few popu- 
lar artists who have had a ballet cre- 
ated especially for their work. 

Ray Charles' career is marked 
by several other recognitions as well. 
In 1979, Charles' version of 'Georgia 
On My Mind' was approved as the 
official song of the state of Georgia. 
Brother Ray, as Charles is often called, 
has received 1 Grammy Awards and 
numerous gold records. During the 
1 970' s Charles received many awards 
including the Golden Plate Award and 
the National Association for Sickle 
Cell Disease's first "Man of Distinc- 
tion" Award. On December 16, 1981, 
Ray Charles received a Star on Holly- 
wood Boulevard's "Walk of Fame." 
In January 1986, Ray was inducted 
into The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. 
His next honor was bestowed in De- 
cember of the same year when he 
named as one of the recipients of the 
Kennedy Center Honors. Then in 
January 1988, Ray Charles received 
the National Academy of Recording 
Arts and Sciences' Lifetime Achieve- 
ment Award. 

General admission tickets to the 
concert are $5 for the bleacher section 
and S 10 for floor seating. These tick- 
ets may be ordered by sending a 
stamped, self-addressed envelope, 
along with a check payable to NS U, to 
Ray Charles Concert, Department of 
Music and Theatre Arts, Northwest- 
ern State University, Natchitoches, 
LA 71497. 

There will also be eight-seat 
tables, priced at $100 each, available 
exclusively for benefactor, patron and 
sponsor members of theNatchitoches- 
Northwestern Symphony Society. 
These tables may be reserved by 
members by calling NSU's Depart- 
ment of Music and Theatre Arts at 
(318) 357-4522. Individuals inter- 
ested in becoming members of the 
Natchitoches-Northwestern Sym- 
phony Society should contact Mrs. 
Margaret Adkins at (318) 352-3867. 



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PAGE 7 



CURRENT SAUCE 



AUGUST 30, 1988 




SPORTS 



[aCoach Goodwin says Demon team is one of best yet 

CHRIS McGEE teams ranked in the Division I-AA ster who can really turn the corner, the fortv vard dash. Senior Mark «w s i, v. n ,„ rM H; n ^ a f™.:... „i.„ f „..u. ^ -1^. „ , 



f CHRIS McGEE 
■forts Writer 

You really can't blame Demon 
fad football coach Sam Goodwin if 
(»i see him walking around these 
Hys with a big, fat smile stretching 
y infinity across his face. 

You see, Goodwin's gridiron 
oops return 18 of 22 starters and 42 
ttermen from a team that recorded a 
,5 record in 1987. Included in last 
tar's final mark is a pair of two-point 
jtbacks to North Texas State and the 
jvision I-AA national champions, 
jortheast Louisiana University. 

Goodwin has already stated that 
It 1988 version of the Demons is his 
■\st squad since arriving at North- 
estem State. When one surveys the 
jormous array of returning talent, he 
is to agree that Goodwin's opinion is 
>ry justifiable. 

Despite the returning talent and 
iperience, victories will not arrive 
'% Easy Street for the Demons. A 
jorous schedule bears witness to 
t fact. The Demons will face five 



teams ranked in the Division I-AA 
preseason Top 20 poll. 

Whether by land or through the 
air, the Demon offense should have 
little problem keeping the scoreboard 
operator busy. The Demons pack 
plenty of ammunition at the "skill" 
positions. 

"We should be strong offen- 
sively," said Goodwin. "We have 9 
starters returning and we have good 
depth." 

The responsibility of leading the 
NSU march to the end zone this sea- 
son will once again be shared by jun- 
ior Scott Stoker (5-8, 157) and senior 
Rusty Slack (6-3, 201). Gilbert Gal- 
loway (5-11, 188), a capable and tal- 
ented senior, will also play if he isn't 
redshirted. 

Although NSU lost little in 
quantity, they absorbed a great loss in 
quality with the departure of NSU all- 
time leading rusher, John Stephens. 
He was a first-round draft pick of the 
NFL's New England Patriots. 

Ken De Witt (5-9, 177), a speed- 



ster who can really turn the corner, 
was pencilled in as the starting tail- 
back before suffering a broken arm. 
DeWitt is expected to miss three weeks 
of action. 

For the time being, Paul Frazier 
(5-10, 190) will fill in. Frazier, a 
sophomore, led the Demons last year 
in yards per cany average with a 6.9 
mark. James McKellom and Brad 
Brown will provide depth at tailback 
while Brian Driskell, a 5-11, 190 lb. 
freshman is scheduled to start at full- 
back. He'll be backed up by Mike 
O'Neal (5-11, 228) and Pete Ellis (5- 
10, 196). 

The Demon pass receiving corps 
is a fast and dangerous group ready to 
make toast out of enemy secondaries. 
Floyd Turner returns for his final 
campaign at flanker where he aver- 
aged 20.8 yards per catch last year 
while hitting paydirt three times. Al 
Edwards (5-8, 168) will start at split 
end. Last year, Edwards averaged 
22.8 yards per catch on 18receptions. 
Turner and Edwards both run a 4.4 in 



the forty yard dash. Senior Mark 
Mayfield will back up Edwards with 
Orlan Lockhart (6-2, 230) manning 
the tight end spot. 

No offense is successful with- 
out a strong offensive line, and the 
Demons are no exception. 'This is the 
best offensive line I've had since 
1984," said Goodwin. 

Jeff Steers (6-0, 235) and Rob- 
bie Martin (6-0, 251) will anchor this 
line along with Nick Day (6-2, 245). 
Other starters are John King (6- 1 , 245) 
and Sean Freeman (6-1, 240). 

Depth will be the main concern 
foraDemon defensive unit that ranked 
second overall in total defense in the 
Southland Conference last year. 

The top brick in the defensive 
front wall will be Henry Sibley, who 
recorded 7 sacks in 1987. MitchRowe 
and Chuck Orzehoskie will also start 
here along with Henri Wesley (6-2, 
227). TriandMcCoyandBrianGuidry 
will be depended upon for back-up 
help along with Sidney Thissel. 



"We have our starting defensive 
line, but depth isaproblem. Someone 
needs to step up," commented Good- 
win. 

The area of linebacker seems 
like an area of strength with top 
tacklers Leonard Parker (5-10, 207) 
and Freddie Wallace (6-0, 225) re- 
turning. Tracy Palmer and Mark 
Newstrom, a pair of 6-1, 230 poun- 
ders, will also play a vital role here. 

Goodwin seems very pleased 
with his experienced secondary , which 
he says is as good as any other in the 
state. 

Thetopsofthisformidablegroup 
is senior Kevin Lewis (5-11,171), a 
four-year starter. 

"The entire secondary is pretty 
solid, but I would have to say that 
Kevin is our ace," stated Goodwin. 

Interceptions may be par for this 
group, and Lewis' partners in crime 
will include David Chitman (5-11, 
1 75), Randolph Hayes (6-1,1 90), and 
Dennis Smith (5-9, 174). 

The kicking game is yet another 



plus for the Demons. Keith Hodnett 
will do the placekicking while Mark 
Contreras will handle the punting. 
Hodnett can become NSU's all-time 
leading field goal kicker with one 
field goal on Saturday. 

The Demons open this Saturday 
night against the Southwest Missouri 
State Bears, a team that returns 17 
starters from a squad that went 5-6 in 
1987. The Bears employ a stubborn 
defense and a wishbone offense that 
makes few mental errors. Kickoff is 
setfor 7:00p.m. in Turpin Stadium. It 
should be a real tooth and nail battle, 
so plan on being there. 

Northwestern students, watch 
for the "Sam Goodwin Football Show" 
this fall on Sunday nights at 10:30 
p.m. The show will air on KTBS-TV 
3 (ABC), which is stationed in Shre- 
veport. The show will concentrate on 
highlights from the previous night's 
game along with covering different 
aspects of life on the Northwestern 
campus. 



Northwestern appoints Bell as head basketball coach 



jTOMWANCHO 
mtributor 

Dan Bell, assistant basketball 
ach at East Carolina University and 
former basketball player and gradu- 
assistant coach at Northwestern 
ite University, was appointed Au- 
1 1 1 as NSU's head coach. 

Northwestern president, Dr. 
lertAiost, said Bell's appointment 
somes effective immediately, pend- 
approval of the Board of Trustees 
Louisiana Colleges and Universi- 
s. Bell, who has also coached at 
irshall University, Nicholls State, 
1 Walker Junior College, was se- 
ledfromsome40 applicants for the 
rthwestern position. Eleven candi- 
is were interviewed by the NSU 
letic council, which recommended 
appointmentof Bell to the Univer- 



sity president 

Alost said that the 32-year-old Bell 
"brings youthful energy and enthusi- 
asm but also valuable and extensive 
coaching experience to the head coach- 
ing position at Northwestern. I am 
confident that the revitalization of the 
Northwestern basketball program will 
continue under his direction." 

The Northwestern president also 
said, "It is especially gratifying that 
Coach Bell, in addition to having 
outstanding qualifications and rich 
experiences in college coaching, is 
also an alumnus of Northwestern." 

Bell said he is "thrilled and thank- 
ful for the opportunity to return to my 
alma mater as head coach. I am dedi- 
cated to the goal of developing a strong, 
stable, successful program that will 
bring pride to Northwestern students, 



faculty and staff, alumni and the 
community." 

An assistant at East Carolina dur- 
ing arebuilding campaign last season, 
Bell was on Rick Huckaby's staff at 
Marshall University from 1983 
through 1987 when Marshall com- 
piled a 90-36 record and appeared in 
three NCAA post-season tournaments. 

While Bell was at Marshall, the 
school won two Southern Conference 
championships and three conference 
tournani -nts. Marshall had the long- 
est winning streak in the nation with 
15 straight victories during Bell's last 
season as an assistant and posted rec- 
ords of 25-6, 21-13, 19-11 and 25-6 
during his four years on the staff. 

Bell was an assistant at Nicholls 
State in 1981-82. He joined the staff 
after therecruitingseason.andNicholls 



Time Out With Vic 



I want to encourage you to participate and give 100% of your support to 
te Demons this season. You are the most important part of NSU because your 
>irit is what keeps Demonland alive!! Without you, we cannot have a 
iccessful season; so participate and let your Demon spirit lead us through 

w Vic"torious season ! ! 

A big thanks going out to all of you who came out to support the Demons 
1st Thursday during the "Meet the Demons" Night. If you didn't come, you 
issed one heck of a great time! 

Our first home game is this Saturday and I expect to see you there! The 
m begins with the tailgate party in Prather's parking lot at 3:30 p.m. Kick- 
!f is at 7 p.m. 

Come out and cheer on the Demons! ! We're gonna kick Southwest Missouri's 
t! ! ! 



I'll see you there! 




Vic the Demon 



1: 




FOOTBALL SCHED 

9/03 S.W.MISSOURI 7:00 
9/10 U. of Nevada-Reno 1:00 
9/24 E. TEXAS STATE 7:00 
10/01 + S.W. TX. STATE # 2:00 

10/08 + McNeese State 7:00 
10/15 NICHOLLS STATE 7:00 

10/22 + Northeast La * 7:00 
10/29 +SAM HOUSTON 7:00 
11/05 +North Texas State 2:00 

11/12 Jackson State 7:30 
11/19 +Stephen R Austin 2:00 



# HOMECOMING 
* STATE FAIR GAME 
+ SOUTHLAND CONFERENCE GAME 

(Home Games Printed in BOLD) 



L. 



won just six games. But Bell's first 
class of recruits helped lead Nicholls 
to 16 wins the following year, when 
the school enjoyed its first winning 
season in Division I. 

Early in the 1982-83 season, Bell 
left Nicholls to become interim head 
coach at Walker Junior College — 
where he played — when Coach Glen 
Clem suffered a heart attack after two 
games of the regular season. 

Bell had a 10-0 record as interim 
head coach and finished the season as 
associate head coach when Clem re- 
turned. The earn posted a 29-4 rec- 
ord, wpnthestatejuniorcollegecham- 
pionship, the Alabama, Mississippi 
and Louisiana regional title and lost in 
the semifinals to eventual national 
champion San Jacinto in the national 
junior college championship. 



Before entering college coaching, 
Bell was a player coach for the Ath- 
letes in Action basketball team in 
Vancouver, British Columbia. In his 
two seasons with Athletes in Action, 
the team compiled an 83-12 record in 
games played throughout the United 
States, Canada and Europe. 

Bell played at Northwestern in 
1975-76 and 1976-77 after two years 
at Walker Junior College in Jasper, 
Alabama. He averaged 12.7 points a 
game as a junior at Northwestern and 
15.6 points as a senior when NSU 
finished 17-9. He had a 14.8 scoring 
average at Walker, where he earned 
all-State honors. 

Bell is married to the former Diana 
Calhoun. They have two sons. 




Dan Bell 



Making a hit 




■:f!?: : 




WTWl W 




While practicing in Turpin Stadium, Northwestern Demons work 
on their strategy for this weekend's game and the upcoming season. 



AUGUST 30, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 8 




CAMPUS LINE 



r 



Bigger and better "Spirit" returns to Northwestern 



NATCHITOCHES— The 

"Spirit" has returned to Northwestern 
State University. 

More than 240 students reported 
to the NSU campus last weekend to 
participate in eight days of pre-school 
marching and playing rehearsals with 
the "Spirit of Northwestern" Demon 
Marching Band, the second largest 
university marching band in Louisi- 
ana. 

Bill Brent, chairman of the 
Department of Music and Theatre Arts 
and director of bands at NSU, is in his 
fifth year as director of the "Spirit of 
Northwestern" Demon Marching 
Band. 

Two band rehearsals per day 
were conducted through Wednesday 
and on Thursday, August 25, the 
"Spirit of Northwestern" Demon 
Marching Band and the Cane River 
Belles performed at 6 p.m. in Turpin 
Stadium. 

The 1988 edition of the "Spirit 
of Northwestern" Demon Marching 
Band will give its first field perform- 
ance on Saturday, September 3, when 
NSU hosts Southwest Missouri at 7 
p.m. in Turpin Stadium. 

For the season opener, the NSU 
marching band will present a 'Tribute 
to Hollywood," playing such music as 
"Hurray For Hollywood," the "MGM 
Fanfare," the theme songs from the 
movie versions of Broadway's "An- 
nie" and "Carousel," and Dolly 
Parton's title song for "9 to 5." 



"9 to 5" was selected for the 
opening show to pay special tribute to 
Dolly Parton, one of the stars of Steel 
Magnolias, which is being filmed 
through mid-SeptemberatNorthwest- 
ern and in the Natchitoches area. 

A"SoulSister"show,including 
a variety of traditional soul music, 
will be presented Saturday, Septem- 
ber 24, when NSU hosts East Texas 
State University at 7 p.m. 

The "Spirit of Northwestern" 
Demon Marching Band has planned a 
special Halloween spectacular, includ- 
ing such music as "Phantom of the 
Opera," for the NSU-Nicholls State 
University game at 7 p.m. on Satur- 
day, October 15. 

A "Tribute to New York City" is 
the theme of the band's performance 
on Saturday, October 29, when NSU 
plays host to Sam Houston State Uni- 
versity at 7 p.m. 

This show will feature such 
musical selections as "New York, New 
York," "On Broadway," "Harlem 
Nocturne," and "Slaughter on 10th 
Avenue." 

The "Spirit of Northwestern" 
Demon Marching Band will also fea- 
ture in special during NSU's Home- 
coming game against Southwest Texas 
State University at 2 p.m. on Satur- 
day, October 1. 

In addition to the five home 
football games in Turpin S tadium , the 
band is scheduled to perform at three 
road games— Saturday, October 8, at 



7 p.m. at NcNeese State University in 
Lake Charles; Saturday, October 22, 
at 7 p.m. for the NSU-Northeast 
Louisiana University State Fair Clas- 
sic at Independence Stadium in Shre- 
veport, and Saturday, November 19, 
at 7 p.m. at Stephen F. Austin State 
University in Nacogdoches, Texas. 

Northwestern 's marching band, 
which has grown in membership by 
more than 400 percent since Brent 
joined NSU in 1984, will also present 
exhibition performances for the Lou- 
isiana Music Educators' Association 
district marching band festival in 
Mansfield on Tuesday, October 25, 
and in Shreveport on Tuesday, No- 
vember 8. 

The highlight of the NSU march- 
ing band's fall schedule will be on 
Sunday, November 27, when the 
"Spirit of Northwestern" is featured 
in pre-game and halftime perform- 
ances at the New Orleans Saints-New 
York Giants football game to be played 
at 7 p.m. in the Louisiana Superdome 
in New Orleans and televised nation- 
ally by ESPN. 

In addition to its scheduled per- 
formances, the band is being consid- 
ered as one of Louisiana's band en- 
tries in the 1989 Inaugural Day parade 

in Washington, D.C., on Friday, Janu- 
ary 20. 

Louis Robinett, Jr., of Carthage, 
Texas, a senior music education ma- 
jor, is the new drum major of the 



"Spirit of Northwestern" Demon 
Marching Band. 

The NSU band's section leaders 
this fall are: flutes — Cindy Berry and 
Vanessa Fields of Bossier City and 
Caroline Risher of Abilene, Texas; 
clarinets — Mike Rowley of Marshall, 
Texas, Chandra Blackston of Natchi- 
toches, and Bill Fox of Houston, 
Texas; saxophone — Brett Bell of 
Sabine, Texas, and Tony Alvis of 
Natchitoches; trumpets — Gerald 
Poole of Jena, Robert Turcheck of 
Bossier City, Ronald Johnnie of 
Natchitoches, Steve Kane of 
Longview, Texas, Brad Hicks of 
Leesville, and Cindy Hensarling of 
Woodville, Texas; horns — JoAnne 
Penaof San Antonio, Texas, Michelle 
Reber of Marshall, Texas, and Shane 
Smith of Natchitoches; trombones — 
Tom Wallace of Natchitoches, James 
LaCombe of Marksville, Jeff Mat- 
thews of Bossier City, and Daniel 
Hellman of Houma; baritones — Wil- 
liam Wolfe of Denham Springs and 
Hank Ewing of Shreveport; tuba — 
Mike Townsend and William Hymes 
of Natchitoches; percussion — Vertis 
Walker of Bossier City and Doug 
Dement of Austin, Texas. 

For further information on the 
"Spirit of Northwestern" Demon 
Marching Band, call (318) 357-4522 
or write B ill Brent, Director of Bands, 
Department of Music and Theatre Arts, 
Northwestern State University, 
Natchitoches, Louisiana, 71497. 



GUYS &, GAIJS 

WELCOMES NSU 
STUDENTS 

We have the latest 
in hair fashions 
Call for an appointment 
or walk-ins welcome 
Located in the Student Union 
Phone 357-5451 
Open Mon.-Fri 9a.m. until 



Polishing up their acts 

Left: Karen Glass of Oakdale con- 
centrates on her routine as a 
member of the Demon Dazzlers. 
Middle: Calvin Glass of Feriday 
practices with his trumpet for his 
performance in this weekend's 
game. Right: Louis Robinett, Jr. of 
Carthage, Texas shows his skill as 
the band's new drum major. 





RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 




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SEPTEMBER 6, 1988 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 
OF LOUISIANA 



VOL. 77, NO. 6 



■ 

Roemer sees high hopes for Louisiana schools 



LyH. SCOTT JOLLEY 
taff Writer 

"It is the best of times, and it is 
ie worst of times," said Governor 
-Juddy Roemer at a speech given to 
^lorthwestern students on Thursday, 
September 1, at the A.A. Fredericks 
-fine Arts Auditorium at 1:30 p.m. 

Using the quote from Dickens 
ga kind of theme, Roemer went on to 
jy, "Surely, in Louisiana 1988, it is 
10th the best and the worst of times." 
iome of those "worst times" included 
political leadership and key parts of 
chool and society, which were "un- 
focused, unmanaged, and untouched." 

However, Roemer changed all 
Jiat, although he will not admit doing 
iby himself. "It took twenty years 
Did we didn't do it overnight But we 
Jid it. We — not me." The governor 
made comparisons to Massachusetts 
ind South Carolina, saying that those 



two states were at the bottom of the 
barrel for a time. "Butnow.they'reon 
top. And with your help, we'll put 
Louisiana where it belongs — on top." 

He recalled how he was at a 
meeting with Democratic Vice-Presi- 
dential hopeful Senator Lloyd 
Bentsen, who remarked that Massa- 
chusetts was once in debt for approxi- 
mately $300 million. "We did that on 
weekends," joked Roemer, referring 
to Louisiana's overinflated budget. 

"When I came into office, I was 
in shock for ninety days after looking 
at the books," he said. According to 
Roemer, the past administration had 
left the state with no goals, no conti- 
nuity, and no prospect for growth. 
"Well, we scrubbed the budget — if 
we start with a balanced budget, we' 11 
end with a balanced budget." 

Along with the newly-balanced 
budget, another of Roemer' s reforms 



has been education. "We've revised 
kindergarten through twelfth grades 
and we're even raising teacher pay 
when the state is bankrupt." The 
governor said he wants the best teacher 
in every classroom. 

Moving on to higher education, 
Roemer plans to integrate the school 
system to create one state system for 
all schools. "We need to find our 
scope and mission." Stressing a fur- 
ther need for both quality and com- 
mitment, he said, "If we can rethink 
the role of higher education, it will be 
the engine that pulls our state." 

Roemer remarked on how dif- 
ferent Northwestern seemed to him. 
"If you had taken a snapshot of NSU 
five years ago, you would have seen a 
lot of blank spaces. Student enroll- 
ment was down and the university 
lacked a scope and a mission." But, 
said Roemer proudly, "President 



Bobby Alost changed all that with his 
leadership." 

"There is ho place in this state 
for where we don't care about each 
other," stated the governor emphati- 
cally, going on to point out that if 
Louisiana is to be one state, "all must 
come together — black and white, rich 
and poor, north and south." 

Roemer urged the assembled 
students to stay in school. "When you 
graduate, you'll make me strong and 
you'll make the state strong." 

Near the end of his speech, the 
governor shared a vision with his 
audience: "I see a clear summer 
morning.. .Louisiana can lead Amer- 
ica. Louisiana can be a winner." But, 
as he pointed out, this could not be 
completed without students, whom he 
considers to be the state's future. 
"There is a need for you. Not me — but 
us. This is our time, not mine." 




Buddy Roemer 



Most: "There is nothing that Northwestern cannot do" 



By ANDY HARRISON 
Kaff Writer 



Every where I go, people are 
liking about what's happening at 
[Northwestern, The friendliness of the 
idents is really rewarding. You can 
y walk across this campus with- 
everyone speaking to you." says 
western President Dr. Robert 
Most in reference to the new image 
Northwestern has taken on. 

This fact was evidenced by the 
beech given here last week by Gov- 
mor Buddy Roemer. Alost remarked, 
rThe Governor was very pleased with 
pe reception here. It was exciting 
sitting on that stage seeing all those 
hight shining faces. There was proba- 
Hy more spirit than I've seen on this 
nmpus in 20 years." 



With Northwestern growing at 
such rapid proportions, the university 
is naturally going to going to have 
problems. The long lines at registra- 
tion is just one of a handful of prob- 
lems seen on campus. When asked 
about what the university is going to 
do to help try and speed up registra- 
tion, he said they would be network- 
ing the computers and using some 
new software. 

Alost also added that there were 
some procedural things that could wait 
until after registration to do. How- 
ever, registration is not the only prob- 
lem. For many students, parking has 
become a big issue. When asked 
about the parking situation, Alost said 
the he was aware of the problem and 
that they were trying to work out a 
solution. Alost also added, "part of 
that is that everyone wants to be within 



ten steps of the frontdoor. You can go 
to some of the major universities in 
this country and you will see that 
more people are walking than ever 
before and part of that is they've 
learned that if they give up their park- 
ing place they won't get it back." 

The results of increased enroll- 
ment are not all bad. With more 
students comes more money. North- 
western is in a much better financial 
state than it was two years ago. When 
Alost became president in July of 1986, 
Northwestern was in a financial pinch, 
but other universities were not Alost 
commented, "We've corrected our 
business. Although we are solvent 
now, we are still not as flush as we 
should be, but we are in a posture 
similar to other institutions, we are 
not out there by ourselves." 

Alost also added that, with the 



governor's commitment to higher 
education, we can expect to see the 
him increase the funding of higher 
education to the level that is competi- 
tive with the other colleges and uni- 
versities in the southern region. That 
could mean another six to eight mil- 
lion dollars to Northwestern. Alost 
remarked, "that' s the cream , that's the 
gravy that we don't have and that 
would be tremendously beneficial to 
this institution to get to that point" 

When asked how the budget cut 
would effectNorthwestern, Alost said 
that the university lost about $600,000, 
which is a dramatic loss to the univer- 
sity because of the funding structure. 
Even though Northwestern has had an 
enrollment increase, the growth of 
the university has to be absorbed in 
the this years budget because we do 
not get the funding for the enrollment 



increase until the next fiscal year. 
However Alost did point out that "the 
legislature was as nice as they could 
be, considering the circumstances." 

Dr. Alost was very enthusiastic 
about rush. He said he was pleased 
with the turnout and said that the people 
he talked to were also pleased. Alost 
said about the Greeks, "I'm really 
excited about the fraternities' and 
sororities' potential down on the lake 
front. I think that's going to be a great 
addition to our campus. Itis probably 
going to attribute to the growth of the 
university as much as anything else." 

When several of the students 
returned to campus after the summer, 
they found that their student work job 
and housing scholarship had been cut 
out When asked about this Alost 
said, "Mrs. (Marilyn) Haley is work- 
ing to determine who showed up and 



who did not, because it is our intent to 
continue people on their work study 
job as long as they make their grades. 
We are going to try to see that all 
students that want to have a job have 
a job." 

Alost further commented on the 
issue of housing scholarships by say- 
ing, "we will probably within two 
years phase those out totally. The 
Attorney General's office, the Board 
of Trustees and the Governor's office 
allowed us to do that in an attempt to 
begin to attract students, but is was 
designed and is designed for fresh- 
men." 

With an optimistic outlook for 
Northwestern, Alost said that we can 
expect things to get better. "With the 
governor's help, there's nothing that 
NSU can't do." 



\Steel Magnolias approaches final filming stages 



fy KAREN ENGERON 

(Elizabeth McDavid 

pN MILLER 
Waff Writers 

After a steaming summer of 
Ihovie takes and retakes in the Natchi- 
Ipches community, Steel Magnolias 
"finally in the last stages of filming. 
Scenes left to be filmed include a foot- 
ball scene, a beauty pageant a church 
fcene, Christmas Lights Festival, and 
\ w Christmas Lights Parade. 

Bill Dance, extras casting direc- 
p for the movie Steel Magnolias, 
\ psted 30 to 40 physically fit young 
| fen agesl8-21 for an exciting and 
i jgmical scene in a football locker 



room. Due to NCAA rules, all 1988 
fall Northwestern State University 
football players are not eligible for 
these parts. 

The scene will feature Shirley 
Mac Lai ne and Qlympia Dukakis, with 
Dukakis interviewing the star football 
player of the game, Ray Ross. The 
role of the football star is a speaking 
part and has yet to be decided. 

When asked his thoughts on the 
people of Northwestern, Dance said, 
"I am most impressed with North- 
western State University. I find the 
people here are quite energized, excit- 
ing and show similar spirit not only 
towards the progress of themselves 




The victim of overcrowded parking lots, a car gets a ticket. 



and their careers but to the future 
development of NSU." 

Since coming to the Natchito- 
ches area, Dance said he has inter- 
viewed somewhere between 10 and 
1 1 thousand people. When interview- 
ing a potential extra he begins sizing 
up the person at first glance. 

"Sixty percent of the individual 
is the person's physique. It is impor- 
tant to look the part," said Dance. 
"The other forty percent is the person's 
inner ability." 

When asked what was Dance's 
definition of talent he simply re- 
sponded, 'Talent is the instinct of 
understanding the human heart." 



Ronnie Wiggins, a freshman 
from DeRidder, is one of two people 
up for the character Ray Ross who is 
featured in the football scene. 

"We won't know until the day 
of shooting who will get the part," 
said Wiggins. "It is a great feeling 
having been considered for the part; a 
once in a lifetime chance!" 

Northwestern students chosen 
to play in the beauty pageant scene are 
Martha Johnson, a freshman from 
Natchitoches; Anjanette Lee, a fresh- 
man from Shreveport; Amy Pietsch, a 
freshman from Ringgold and Chrissy 
Ruth, a freshman from Monroe. 

"I am really thrilled and hon- 



ored to have been chosen by Hebert 
Ross. I hope this will benefit in my 
future in the theatre. I am ecstatic!" 
exclaimed Lee. 

The church scene will be shot 
Wednesday, September 7 at the Epis- 
copal Church. The times are not 
known. 

rnlrning for the Christmas Lights 
activities will take place September 
13-15 from 5:00 pjn.-5:00 a.m. Ap- 
proximately 350 extras have been cho- 
sen for this part 

The filming of Steel Magnolias 
is reportedly on schedule. The filming 
crew has planned to be finished with 
filming between September 16 and 



17. Movie officials said the movie is 
scheduled to be released in December 
1989 or January 1990. 

Tri-Star Pictures and Rastar 
Productions hosted an open house for 
Northwestern faculty and staff on Sun- 
day, August 28 from 1 to 6 p.m. in the 
P.E. Majors building on the NSU 
campus. According to Tom 
Whitehead, local contact approxi- 
mately 600 employees were in atten- 
dance at the event which was held to 
allow Northwestern to get a closer 
look at the making of the film. 

Bill Dance and Julie Weiss, in 
costuming, provided a tour of the 
sound stage. 



Increased student enrollment brings 
increased parking problems, tickets 



By DeANNA COCHRAN 
StqffWriter 

Northwestern has experienced 
its greatest increase in enrollment for 
the first time in 1 5 years, according to 
Ricky Williams, police chief of the 
university. Although a large enroll- 
ment is good for the university, one 
major problem has resulted from it 
Along with the increased number of 
students came an increase in traffic 
problems. 

Parking on campus this semes- 
ter has not been a pleasant experience 
for many students due to the limited 
amount of parking spaces. Some 
students have complained about the 
situation and have made suggestions 
for improvement. 



Rolanda Rogers, a freshman 
from Winnfield said, "They need 
parking spaces closer to the class- 
rooms for students." Karen Shadow 
and Shannon Trigg, both freshmen, 
agreed that new parking lots should be 
built. 

Harold Boutte, chairman of the 
traffic committee, said that he thinks 
the situation is looking good so far. 
According to Boutte\ no date has been 
set for the first committee meeting. 
The traffic committee meets once a 
month, as does an appeal committee. 



Boutte' suggested that any park- 
ing problems could be reduced if dorm 
residents would not drive to class. He 



would like to say 'Thank you" to all 
those who walk to class. 

Williams said there is a major 
parking problem, especially in upper 
lot 25 near Rapides and Caddo. He 
said the situation is already improving 
and will probably work itself out 

Williams also suggested that 
students walk to class in order to re- 
duce the chance of being late to class 
or receiving a ticket for illegal park- 
ing. Students are warned that zones 
are being strictly enforced. A map 
illustrating these zones may be found 
on the back of the vehicle regulations 
pamphlet available at the University 
Police Department 

A student receiving a ticket for 



any parking violation other than park- 
ing in a handicapped zone will be 
charged a $5 fee. Students in viola- 
tion of a handicapped parking zone 
will be charged a $15 fee. Williams 
said these fees are campus fees, which 
are far less expensive than state fees. 
He also said that habitual violators 
will be issued state tickets. 

Fred Fulton, director of Student 
Life, agreed with Boutte and Wil- 
liams that the problem would be 
reduced if residential students would 
walk to class, leaving parking spaces 
open to commuters. He added that 
there is adequate parking space for the 
number of cars on campus. Fulton 
encourages students to park in the 
correct zones. 



PAGE 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 6, 1988 



NEWS 



Journalism teacher brings experience 



By MINDY BECK 
Staff Writer 



If you've seen a new face among 
the faculty, it's probably our new 
Journalism teacher, Mr. Leon Lind- 
say. A native of Natchitoches, Mr. 
Lindsay went to first grade through 
college on this campus. Since he 
graduated in 1949 from Louisiana 
State Normal College with a 
Bachelor's Degree in Journalism, the 
campus has doubled in size and en- 
rollment is several times larger. "There 
are a lot of exciting things going on 
here now," said Lindsay. "It's obvi- 



ous the main reason for this turn- 
around is Dr. Alostand his vitality and 
ideas which have led to things such as 
Scholars' College." 

Mr. Lindsay was an editorial writer 
for an internationally, world-wide 
newspaper, The Christian Science 
Monitor, in Boston for twenty-five 
years. Lindsay was also a city editor 
for eleven years, a regional corre- 
spondent in Atlanta for three years, a 
regional correspondent in San Fran- 
cisco for two years and an assistant 
national editor. His first newspaper 
job was sports editor for the Alexan- 
driaDailyTownTalk. He also worked 
for the Baton Rouge Morning Advo- 



cate, and The St. Louis Globe Demo- 
crat. 

Even though he's new on the fac- 
ulty, Mr. Lindsay is not new in the 
classroom. He taught at Arlington 
State University in Texas, Kansas State 
University, and the University of 
Missouri, where he received his 
Masters Degree in Journalism. "I'm 
very pleased with the response of the 
students as to what I'm trying to do so 
far," commented Lindsay. "What I 
hope to do is be able to impart some 
basic news media skills and help 
them understand the news media by 
sharing my experiences with them." 

Mr. Lindsay has two sons. One is 



an urban planner in San Francisco, 
and the other is a geologist working 
on a Master's Degree in Environ- 
mental Engineering at the University 
of California. His wife, Joan Lind- 
say, is a professional librarian who is 
now working as a volunteer librarian 
on campus. 

As for his plans for the year, Lind- 
say will be getting well prepared in the 
courses he's teaching. The courses he 
teaches are News Writing 1 and 2, 
Editing, and Journalism Ethics. "I see 
a lot of enthusiasm, the attitude of 
mostof the students is positive," added 
Lindsay. "They say it's a friendly 
campus, and I think it really is." 




I hope to be able to 
impart some basic news 
media skills to my stu- 
dents and help them 
understand the news 
media by sharing my 
experiences with them." 
Leon Linsday, new 
Journalism teacher at 
NSU,has worked on the 
Alexandria Daily Town 
Talk, the Baton Rouge 
Daily Advocate, the St. 
Louis Globe Democrat, 
and the Christian Sci~ 
ence Monitor. 




Board promotes usage rules 
for Student Union Ballroom 



Letters to the 
Current Sauce 
are welcome, 
provided they 
are signed. 



1 By CAROLINE WARD 
Staff Writer 

For a number of years, univer- 
sity and non-university groups have 
enjoyed the privilege of being able to 
utilize the Student Union Ballroom 
for special functions. During the past 
year, several problems have arisen, 
illustrating the fact that sometimes 
certain privileges are takenfor gran ted. 
; Carl P. Henry III, Director of Student 
» Activities and Organizations, de- 
3 scribed the two basic problems as 
being last minute cancellations and 
alcohol-related violations. 

Last minute cancellations cause 
many inconveniences for everyone 
involved with the ballroom. First of 
all, the ballroom is prepared ahead of 
time for the event. Chairs and tables 
are arranged, and pains are taken to 
achieve a comfortable temperature 



within the ballroom. University 
police have been assigned to provide 
security for the event, and the reserv- 
ing of the ballroom prevents any other 
group from having access to it that 
night or weekend of the booking. 

The alcohol-related problems 
have been encountered by the night 
managers thatworkatthe Union. They 
have been forced to deal with non- 
" students and many underage partici- 
pants who have violated the 
university's alcohol policy. Thenight 
managers and other university offi- 
cials haveproblemsdealingwith these 
non-student violators because they 
have little authority over them. Or- 
ganizations are not supposed to allow 
alcohol at their functions unless an 
alcohol control form has been ap- 
proved by the university. 



It was suggested to the Student 
Activities Board that a deposit be 
required to secure a booking. The 
deposit would be forfeited in the event 
that a cancellation was made any later 
than ten days prior to the date of 
booking. It was also proposed that 
any organization wishing to use the 
facilities should be responsible for 
securing the services of off-duty uni- 
versity police to work the event. 

The board approved these 
changes. Now, any group wishing to 
rent the ballroom must pay a fifty 
dollar deposit, which is refunded after 
the event occurs or if a cancellation is 
made ten days before the reserved 
date. Also, if an alcohol request ac- 
companies the reservation, the spon- 
soring organization will be respon- 
sible for securing two, off-duty uni- 
versity police to cover the event 



Student Government Association 
election filing to be held Tuesday 




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Scholars' College hosts 
informative talk show 




92( 



By SHANNON J. GREER 
Staff Writer 

Would you like to attend a 
Donahue-type talk show? Now you 
can do just that right here at North- 
western beginning Monday, Septem- 
ber 19. The Scholars' College Stu- 
dent Life Enrichment Committee will 
sponsor a program entitled "Renaldo" 
every other Monday at 7:00 p.m. in 
Kyser Auditorium (Room 142). 

According to talk show host 
and committee member Reginald 
Williams, the first topic will be man- 
datory drug testing in the workplace. 
Guests scheduled to appear are Natchi- 
toches Parish District Attorney Mike 
Henry, Carl Robertson of the City of 
Natchitoches Police Department, 
ROTC Captain Shirley Hargrove, 
NSU Head Football Coach Sam 
Goodwin and a representative of the 
Louisiana branch of the American 
Civil Liberties Union. 

Don Barker, the Scholars' 
College Student Life Enrichment 
Committee's advisor, said, "Our 
committee is designed to create a set 
of activities for NSU students differ- 
ent in nature and scope than those 
provided by the SAB." The commit- 
tee was formed in May 1988. 

According to committee 
member Andrea Thomas, several trips 
are being planned to such cities as 
Dallas, Houston and New Orleans for 




Hours: 8a.rj 

symphonies and possibly a trip £?riJZ nfl 
Orlando, Florida, for Spring Break!-— — — 
Thomas said, "We also hope to go oi 
a camping trip to Hot Springs, Ar] 
sas, during September." 

Advisor Don Barker tm\ 
sized that although these trips 
planned by a Scholars' College oi 
ganization, other NSU students ma 
participate on a space-available basi 

A successful "creek-walk 
was held by the committee at Kisatchj 
Bayou on Sunday, August 28, 198! 
More than 30 students walked at. 
proximately 3 miles to the Kisatchi 
Falls. 

The committee will sho\ 
movies regularly in Room 207 i 
Russell Hall for all Northwests 
students. Free popcorn will be pn 
vided and other refreshments will 1 
sold to help raise funds. 

Members of the Schola 
College Student Life Enrichme 
Committee are: DerekMitchell.chai 
man; Tracy Favr6, publicity; Kan 
Cresap, campus activities; Andn 
Thomas, travel; Beth Bowman, trav< 
Reginald Williams, talk show ho; 
Keith Triggs, talk show coordinat 
and Tim Cain, graduate assista 
advisor. 

The committee wholehear 
edly invites everyone to attend tl 
"Renaldo" shows and participate 
the other planned activities. 



Hey! The Party's At The 

PARTY CLUB 



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$1 Bar Drinks from 8 to 12 

Located on the Hwy 1 By -Pass in Natchitoches 



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RESEP 



By MINDY BECK 
StaffWriter 

Filings for the Student Govern- 
ment Association (SGA) elections will 
begin Tuesday, September 6 at 8:00 
a.m., and close Wednesday, Septem- 
ber 7 at 4:00 p.m. The elections are 
going to be held for Executive Secre- 
tary, two Senator-at-Large seats and 
all class senators. The elections are 
going to be on September 14 with 
runoffsonSeptember21. Homecom- 
ing court elections will be held the 
same week and the State Fair elec- 
tions will be the 28 of September, with 
runoffs on October 5. All petitions 
should be turned in to Mr. Fulton in 
room 309 in the Student Union. 

The SGA is looking for people 
with good ideas who are willing to put 
in a lot of time and work hard. There 
are a number of committees that need 
to be filled, including: The Distin- 
guished Lectures Series Committee, 



Traffic and Parking Committee, 
Admissions Credit and Graduation 
Council, Student Media Board, Pub- 
lic Relations, Student Life, Home- 
coming Committee, State Fair Com- 
mittee, and the Student Trust Fund 
Committee. "Even if you don't want 
to run for an office, there are many 
other things to be done," said SGA 
Vice President, Andy Harrison. 

The SGA wants students to get 
involved and express their ideas. 
Anyone who has any questions about 
running for office should talk to Mi- 
chael Mason, Commissioner of Elec- 
tions or SGA Vice President, Andy 
Harrison. The Senate meetings are 
held on Monday nights at 6:30. The 
public and anyone interested is in- 
vited to attend. "We intend to have a 
really good year," added Harrison. 
"We wish as many people would get 
involved as they can. Wearethevoice 
of the students, but SGA can't cure a 
problem unless we know it's there." 





tt fot AP* 



MS' 



RESE1 



H 




PAGE 3 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 6, 1988 



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PAGE 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 6, 1988 




— 



— 



EDITC 



Teacher 's writings to be published 



NATCHITOCHES-Dr. Par- 
alee Norman, associate professor and 
coordinator of English at the North- 
western State University Education 
Center at Fort Polk, is the author of an 
article of literary criticism and two 
reviews which have been accepted Re- 
publication. 

The article of literary criticism 
is entitled "Light Satire and Hogarth's 
Pictorial Composition: Marmion 
Savage's novel 'The Falcon Family; 
or, Young Ireland' (1845)." It ap- 
pears in the current issue of Eire- 
Ireland which is the major interdisci- 
plinary journal of Irish studies in the 
United States. 

In the article, she presents analy- 
sis and historical background on the 
first publication by a neglected Irish 
novelistof keen wit who, though minor 
in total literary output, is indefensibly 



omitted in most current anthologies 
and historical notes. 

A biographical and critical study 
of Savage, who was a 19th century 
writer of lightly-satirical fiction, was 
published by Dr. Norman in a 1981 
issue of Books at Iowa, the monthly 
periodical of the University of Iowa 
Libraries. 

Her intentions are to complete 
and publish a book- length manuscript 
on the subject of Savage's life and 
writings after a final research trip to 
Ireland and England next summer. 

The Oklahoma Reader recently 
published Dr. Norman's "Review of 
'Brief Handbook for Writers by James 
F. Howell and Dean Memering," a 
comprehensive college English text- 
book currently in its second printing 
by Prentice Hall. 

Her scholarly presentation called 



"Review of Composition and the 
Academy: A Study of Writing Pro- 
gram Administration" is scheduled to 
appear in the October or December 
issue of Teaching English in the Two- 
Year College, which is a publication 
of the National Council of Teachers of 
English. 

This fall she is beginning her 
10th year of teaching writing, gram- 
mar and literature at the NSU Educa- 
tion Center at Fort Polk. 

Dr. Norman holds the bachelor's 
degree from the University of Mis- 
souri, the master's degree from Drake 
University and the doctorate from the 
( University of Iowa. 

Her numerous honors include 
outstanding teacher awards for pro- 
fessional service at NSU-Fort Polk 
which is Northwestern 's highest merit 
award for teaching. 



[\ie plac 

The future of NSU? park 

Renovations on Northwestern ' s campus will begin soon. Plans callUiuD boi 
for, among other things, a Library Plaza in front of Watson Library^ 'T^'piac 
a pond and several gazebos beside Williamson Hall, and a clockr** bumper 

We advertise) 

tower behind the Student Union. Wt own a car 

For more information, consult the maps in the Student Union.jjthe^u* 
Comments on the proposed renovations are welcome. 



Northwestern Professor to lecture Sept. 24 



NATCHITOCHES— Dr. 
Hiram F. Gregory, professor of an- 
thropology at Northwestern State 
University, will lecture on "Indian 
Contributions to French Louisiana" 
in Marksville on Saturday, Septem- 
ber. 24, at 1 p.m. at the Tunica-Biloxi 
Indians' Tribal Center. 

The Tunica-Biloxi Indians of 
Louisiana are hosting the event, which 
is free to anyone interested in learning 
more about the Tunica-Biloxi Indians 
and about Louisiana archaeology. 

The lecture by the noted NSU 
anthropologist is part of statewide 
activities for Louisiana Archaeology 
Week, which is being celebrated in 1 3 
cities to focus attention on the state's 
archaeological sites and rich cultural 
heritage. 

Gregory, a scholar and re- 
searcher whose studies have brought 
him national recognition as one of the 
most knowledgeable authorities on 
Louisiana Indians, and another NSU 
professor and archaeologist, Clint 
Pine, recently completed an archaeo- 
logical survey of the Tunica-Biloxi 
Indian Reservation in Avoyelles Par- 
ish. 



The survey, conducted in close 
conjunction with tribal planners and 
the Indian community, was a proto- 
type for cooperative research on tribal 
land and will provide the tribe with 
information concerning their cultural 
and historical resources. 

Gregory and Pine worked 
closely with Tunica-Biloxi Tribal 
Chairman Earl Barbry on community 
development plans in an effort to 
preserve the tribal heritage as it exists 
on the reservation. 

Gregory said earlier this sum- 
mer the Tunica-Biloxi Tribe has lived 
on its 130-acre reservation land in 
Avoyelles Parish since 1780 and, over 
the generations, has worked to pre- 
serve cemeteries, sacred areas and 
historical places. 

The NSU professor is one of the 
co-authors of "The Historic Indian 
Tribes of Louisiana from 1 542 to the 
Present," a 1987 Louisiana State 
University Press publication released 
as an important new book which deals 
with the story of Louisiana's first 
inhabitants after the Europeans came 
to this state. 

Gregory, whose research find- 



ings have appeared in many profes- 
sional journals on the national level, is 
especially noted as the co-author of 
"The Caddo of Louisiana." 

He is also the author of "A Prom- 
ise From The Sun: The Folklife Tra- 
ditions of Louisiana Indians" and 
"Saving Your Own House: Folk 
Culture and Mitigation" which he 
contributed to the book "Louisiana 
Folklife: A Guide to the State," a 
1986 publication complied by the 
Louisiana Folklife Program to detail 
the folk traditions of the state. 

Gregory, well known in the 
South as the curator of Williamson 
Museum at NSU, has directed numer- 
ous federal, state and privately-funded 
grant projects, including a nine-month 
program in 1983-1984 to train repre- 
sentatives of the Choctaw tribe of 
Jena, Coushatta tribe of Elton, the 
Tunica-Biloxi tribes of Marksville and 
Mansura, and the Apache-Choctaw 
tribe of Ebarb to establish within their 
communiues mental health and other 
types of referral services for state and 
federal agencies which do not have 
the manpower to offer outreach pro- 
grams to the tribal groups. 





WHEN WE WERE SEARCHING FOR THE LIGHT, AS ALL SPHINXMEN MUST DO, THEY 
STOOD ASIDE AND LAUGHED OUT LOUD, "I WOULDN'T DO THAT! WOULD YOU?" 
AND YET WHEN WE HAD CROSSED THOSE SANDS AND THE LIGHT WE COULD 
FINALLY SEE, THEY STOOD ASIDE AND WHISPERED SOFTLY, "OH HOW I WISH IT 
WERE ME!" 

I KNOW THE DECISION I MADE WAS WISE, OF THI S I'M SURE AND HA VENO DOUBT, 
EACH DAY INMYUFE WILL HAVE BLUE SKIES, FOR I'M AN ALPHA FROM HERE ON 
OUT. AND NEVER AGAIN WILL I BE LONELY FOR I HAVE BROTHERS EVERYWHERE, 
IN CITIES OF POPULATION TWO, I EVEN HAVE A BROTHER THERE. 

THERE IS NOTHING IN THIS WIDE WORLD THAT WE WOULDN'T DO FOR ONE 
ANOTHER; I'M SURE I'D EVEN GIVE MY LIFE TO SAVE THAT OF MY BROTHER. BUT 
THERE ARE STILLTHOSE IN DARKNESSWHO CANNOT UNDERSTAND WHY I WOULD 
SHARE THE BURDEN WHICH BELONGS TO ANOTHER MAN. WHEN ASKED, "WHY 
WEIGH YOURSELF DOWN WITH THE LOAD OF ANOTHER?" I SIMPLY SMILE AT 
THEM AND SAY, 

"HE AIN'T HEAVY ... HE'S MY BROTHER!" 

Brian Brown 
Vice president 
Alpha Phi Alpha 



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EDITORIAL 





























Fraternity expresses brotherhood 

A message from Alpha Phi Alpha 

OUR FAMILY TREES ARE NOT THE SAME, WE BOTH HAVE A DIFFERENT MOTHER 
AND YET I' DfROUDLYTELL THE WORLD THATTHIS MAN IS MY BROTHER. IT SURE 
WE' VE LIVED OUR LIVES TOGETHER, THOUGH WE MEET FOR THE FIRST TIME, AS 
THIS POWERFUL SENSE OF BROTHERHOOD MAKES EVERYTHING SEEM FINE. 

SPECTATORS STAND AND LOOK WITH AWE AS WE DO OUR SECRET SHAKE, NEVER 
REALIZING THATTHIS CLASPING OF HANDS DOES NOT A BROTHER MAKE. WE ARE 
BROTHERS IN A DEEPER SENSE THAN THEY CAN COMPREHEND, FOR WHEN OUR 
BOND HAS JUST BEGUN, THEIR' S ARE ABOUT TO END. 



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,ve any inter 
fere's not one 
"i campus durii 
0ply aren't « 
mntnodate the 
(have this ye£ 
anything u 
giiber of stuck 
The 25 pe 
pBment (yep, 
icent increa 
lined the uni' 
jept for cash, 
any people he 
hat to do with 
Is. Tabor, our i 
a "delightfu 
elightf ul for tf 
otfor the stud* 
Residents 
i park in the 
IbineHall. Ti 
)iring classes, 
Resident 
proximit; 
ossier.Natchit 
ire used to d 
I ar. This year, 
aces. Studen 
jrs past the enc 
tates a traffic h 
at residents of 
owhere close t 
isome points d 



JyMICHELI 
Managing Edi 

Unless y 
five no access 
jhould know c 
pout to mentii 
•end, etc). I 
ateries wonde 
jime old ever 
berville "grub 
ly honest opini 
teed" method 
jberville) to x> 
his than Mom' 

McDonal 
krip", it is the 
bod when reu 
ifal-Mart beca 
in" access. If 
lid relatively ii 
Big Mac and a 

* quick. The a 
*cause every s 
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1 a.m. and 2 \ 
Wever.it is to 
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as a child t 



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TheC 
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Afico 
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Thedi 
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humberv/T' 
frious tettet 

Curre 
Academic 
issues), The 
Natchifocr 



SEPTEMBER 6, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 5 



EDITORIAL 



-____r/z£ place for parking is notNSU 



tnscaU 
ibrary, 
i clock 

Union. 



Parking problems disturb student 



WBRAD BODENHEIMER 
tff Writer 

"The place for you is NSU," or 
5 the bumper sucker reads. Acute 
advertisement, that is, if you 
'town a car. If you do perchance 
jve a car, you don't want to come 
ww here near NSU's campus if you 
,ve any intentions of parking it 
's not one empty parking space 
jcampus during the day. There just 
"jnply aren't enough spaces to ac- 
jinmodate the number of students 
e have this year. There isn't enough 
anything to accommodate the 
(Biber of students here. 

The 25 percent increase in en- 
)Ument (yep, you read right — 25 
acent increase) has completely 
lained the university's resources — 
jcept for cash, that is. There are so 
any people here that we don't know 
hat to do with all of them. I believe 
& Tabor, our registrar, referred to it 
j a "delightful problem to have." 
lelightful for the university, yes, but 
jt for the students. 

Residents of Rapides are forced 
park in the open lot in front of 
ibine Hall. This is at night, this is 
uring classes, this is during meal- 
nes. Residents of dorms not in such 
lose proximity to Iberville (i.e., 
lossier, Natchitoches, Varnado, etc.) 
ere used to driving to dinner last 
This year, there are no parking 
Students park three or four 
past the end slot, which not only 
a traffic hazard, but also means 
gat residents of Rapides are left with 
where close to their dorm to park, 
isome points during the day, they 're 



left with nowhere at all to park, save 
the Prather coliseum parking lot, if the 
band isn't there. 

But I think everyone on campus 
knows the severity of their own park- 
ing situation. What about commuters, 
on campus. There are only about a 
hundred spaces available, anyway, 
after S abine and Rapides residents are 
finished with it the night before. 

Guess who gets into the act now? 
You got it, the campus police. Me- 
thodically they pass every car ensur- 
ing that each one had the proper park- 
ing permit properly displayed and is 
parked in the proper zone. At five 
bucks a pop, wouldn't you write as 
many tickets as you could? 

Maybe we've just been spoiled 
by years of having the campus rela- 
tively to ourselves. I'm sure the park- 
ing problem doesn't bother new stu- 
dents as much because they've never 
known anything else. Anyway, isn't 
this what we've wanted for NSU for a 
long time — for it to grow, for us to 
expand our horizons? Maybe all the 
new students can finally put North- 
western on the map! 

But success carries a price. The 
university is going to have to make 
some major changes in order to allevi- 
ate the parking problem. How about 
some parking lots? That seems logi- 
cal enough. There's plenty of room 
behind Rapides and Iberville for an- 
other lot — designated only for Rapi- 
des and Sabine Residents. This would 
free up the open zone for commuters, 
although it would detract from the 
aesthetic value of the campus, which 



is one of Northwestem's strong points. 

This brings up another idea, like 
coding parking permits for each par- 
ticular dorm, not simply "Resident." 
Students who live in Rapides and 
Sabine don't park in the Varnado or 
Bossier lots so why should other resi- 
though? The lot in front of Kyser and 
the post office is now designated for 
commuters only, but that fills up 
almost instantaneously. Even the open 
zone in front of Sabine is full within 
minutes of the first commuter arriving ( 
dents be permitted to park in the 
Rapides/Sabine lot? 

And how about freeing up some 
faculty slots? Why not assign each 
faculty member his or her own park- 
ing space, keeping a few extra, of 
course, just in case, and using the 
leftovers for commuters? There 
doesn ' t need to be 250 faculty parking 
spots when there are only 100 faculty 
members, for example. 

However, until the administra- 
tion decides to put some of that extra 
revenue to work for the students, stu- 
dent are going to have to fend for 
themselves. Right now, we're the 
only ones who can do anything about 
the problem. Students don't have to 
drive everywhere on campus, espe- 
cially when the weather turns cool. 
It's not that much of a chore to walk 
five or ten minutes or to Iberville. I 
mean, if you're lucky enough to have 
a good parking spot, why would you 
want to move your car unless it was 
absolutely necessary? 

Well, this"delightful little prob- 
lem" could very well change NSU's 



Birr drives 

TO CLASS 



6UT OFFICER, THIS wa5 
THE ONIV PlACE LEFT 
T° PARK REALLY/ 



OK SON , C0«i\E Doxm 

Nice and eash. 



CHIEF \ 

Rftt>»o knvvd For, I 
[TWE wonder twins . J 





en tire image. Already we can see that 
it is no longer a quaint hole university, 
but one that seems to be a getting too 
big for its britches. When that hap- 
pens, one of the two things must be 
done: either "lose some weight" by 
limiting the number of students al- 
lowed to have cars on campus or by 
instituting a selective admissions 
process to limit the number of stu- 
dents on campus; or get some bigger 
britches by expanding the university ' s 
resources. 



If something is not done to erase 
Northwestern ' s parking problem , soon 
all the signs that read "Where students 
come first" are going to have to be 
changed to "Where students had bet- 
ter come first if they want a parking 
spot" 



!y MICHELLE WEEGO 
Managing Editor 

Unless you are a freshman or 
lave no access to a car, all my readers 
iould know of the restaurants I'm 
tout to mention (tear apart, recom- 
nend, etc). I consider all of these 
ttteries wonderful alternatives to the 
nine old everyday Icky. . . I mean 
Iberville "grub" and I will try to give 
ny honest opinion in the familiar "Rex 
teed" method: x (I'd rather eat at 
fcrville) to xxxxx (I'd rather have 
lis than Mom's lasagna.) 

McDonald's — located on the 
strip", it is the best alternative to fast 
bod when returning from a trip to 
Val-Mart because of it's easy "right 
nm" access. I found the food familiar 
od relatively inexpensive ($2.26 for 
Big Mac and a medium coke) as well 
* quick. The atmosphere is friendly 
Kcause every single one of Natchito- 
tes' citizens resides there between 
1 am. and 2 p.m. weekdays. BUT, 
owe ver, it is to be strictly avoided on 
•eekend nights after 8 p.m. unless 
le has a fetish for 16 year old fe- 
Wes with fixations for friendly 17 
far old male fry-flappers. I give it 
pa for familiarity. 

B urger King — similar in almost 
*ery way to McDonald's except the 
*ter drive-through hours and the free 
'urger King hats. This one gets xxxx 
the paper crowns. 
Wendy's — slightly similar to 
and McD's but with a salad bar. 
8ive it only xx because I'm not a 
*bit and I like my burgers round. 
Sonic — I had a bad experience 



be 



as a child that I ' d rather not go in 



to. I'll give it xx for the old-fashioned 
drive-in idea. 

The Pickle Barrel — a great little 
dive between the University Express 
and 2nd Street. They serve only two 
meals: hamburgers(small and large) 
and rib-eye steaks(after the lunch 
rush). This place has the best curli- 
cues in central Louisiana as well as 
housing a pool table, an electronic 
dart game and a jukebox full of coun- 
try hits. The prices are a bit more than 
McD'sorB.K.butaredefinitely worth 
it. This one gets my full xxxxx for 
being a successful family-run busi- 
ness in Natchitoches that also serves 
good food. 

Kentucky Fried Chicken — I give 
it this: at least I think I know what's in 
it. But somehow I remember the par- 
faits being a bit better when I was a 
child, xx for the low prices and the 
great Sunday picnic buckets you can 
use as trashcans in the dorm. 

Farmer Brown' s — this chicken 
establishment in front of Wal-Mart 
has not yet been blessed by my pres- 
ence, but it seems very convenient if I 
were to ever get hungry while wash- 
ing clothes at the Suds-n-Duds next 
door. I give it xx for thatconvenience. 

Pizza Hut — this restaurant has 
the best deep-dish pies in town. My 
featured favorite is the "stuffed" 
priazzo. This may be a bit expensive 
but is worth the splurge (only when 
pay checks come out). The service 
tends to be a bit slow during the eve- 
ning hours but they do have a great 
Mario Brothers video game. I give it 
only xxx for the high prices, the slow 
service and the excess of Tiffany and 



Debbie Gibson records on the juke- 
box. 

Pizza Inn — After eating at the 
buffet every Monday (publication 
night) I feel I am too familiar with the 
restaurant to give an honest opinion 
on the food . . . N AH! The "all you can 
eat" buffet only costs around $5.00 
(this includes a large softdrink) but is 
only worth it if you play NSU football 
and can eat a linebacker. If you do go 
to the buffet, a little hint. Don ' t eat the 
thick crust pizza or the stuff they pass 
off as dessert I give this place xx but 
only because of my loyal Monday 
night patronage. 

Mr. Gatti' s — a profitable place 
for a car wash if you ever drive by on 
a Saturday afternoon. The food is 
mediocre but they do offer a cheap 
$2.00 order of spicy breadsticks that 
is enough to fill you up as you watch 
Days of Our Lives, Another World, 
Santa Barbara . . .This place gets xxx 
for the crushed ice and of course the 
big screen TV. 

Taco Hel. . .1 mean Bell — there 
are times in one's life when one must 
make a run for the border. Mine is 
usually when I have sinus trouble and 
want to blow it out of my head by 
using four packets of hot sauce in my 
already flaming "Dinto and beans." 
xxx for having the same affect as 
sniffing dry ice. 

Cotton Patch — often referred to 
as the "Rotton Hatch" it is regularly 
put down by all NSU students yet I 
always seem to run into several who 
eat there often, (usually after leaving 
the Student Body with a bad case of 



the munchies.) I give this place xx for 
availability at 2:30 a.m. 
Landing — (Those of you who were 
here last year knew it as Shamrock' s .) 
I have yet to visit this place so can 
form no opinion of my own but I have 
heard very good reviews. The food is 
supposedly very good but the prices 
could use some work. 

Lasyone's — a touch of seafood 
and deep south (Cajun) cuisine that 
from what I heard is very, very good 
or very, very bad. . .depending on 
what NCAA team won the night be- 
fore I suppose. The prices are reason- 
able (I've heard). I can give no rating 
because I haven't been. 

Mariner's — I know that every- 
one has heard of this one. The only 
"fashionable" eatery in town, it is the 
only place that people actually refer to 
as a restaurant Sitting pretty on the 
edge of Sibley Lake, it takes a simple 
steak and salad dinner and turns it into 
an expensive meal served by waiters 
and waitresses usually dressed better 
than the patrons. The few times I've 
eaten there I haven't been too im- 
pressed. But still, being the only "nice" 
place in town, it can make such occa- 
sions as formals and celebrations a 
little bit more special. I will give it 
xxxx for it's good reputation. 

That about sums up most of the 
eating establishments in "OUR 
TOWN" so if you've missed a place 
or two, maybe you'll get a chance next 
time you need a break from the same 
old thing. My big hint for the day is to 
count cars in the parking lot If there 
are more than three, then consider it 
safe. Meanwhile. . . "bon appetite!" 



Current Sauce 



The Current Sauce's published weekly during the 
fat and spring semesters by the studentsof Northwest- 
ern State University of Louisiana. It is not associated 
With any of the University's departments and Is fi- 
nanced independently. 

The Current Sauce is based In the Office of 
Student Publications located In Kyser Hall. The office 
of the editorial staff is 225H telephone (3 1 8) 357-6456. 
The adviser's office is 103 Kyser Hal, telephone 357- 
5213. 

The mailng address for the Current Sauceh P.O. 
Box 5306. NSU, Natchrtoche», LA 7 1 497, 

AH correspondence, Including letters to the edi- 
tor is welcome. Material submitted for consideration 
must be mailed to the above address or brought to 
foe office. 

The deadline for all advertisement and copy is 3 
P m. each Friday. Inclusion of any and ail material is 
'oft to the discretion of the editor. 

Letters to the editor should be typed (double- 
spaced), signed and should Include a telephone 
humber where the writer can be reached, No anony- 
mous letters will be printed. 

Current Sauce subscription rates are $11 per 
Qcademic year (28 issues) or $6 per semester (14 
issues). The paper Is entered as second-class mail at 
Natchitoches, LA. The USPS number is 140-660. 



SONYARIGAUD 
Editor 

MICHELLEWEEGO 
Managing Editor 

MINDY BECK BRAD BODENHEIMER SHANNON BOUFFANIB 
BETH BOWMAN EDDIE BRIGGS DeANN A COCHRAN 
KAREN ENGERON ANDY H ARRISON H. SCOTT JO LLEY 
LAURIE LcBLANC ELIZABETH McDAVID CHRIS McGEE 
BRIAN McPHEARSON ANN MILLER CAROLINE WARD 

Staff Writers 

TIM JOHNSON GLEN MOORMAN 
Photographers 



ALLEN 
EVANS 
Advertising 







EVAN TAYLOR 
Cartoonist ' 

DAMIANDOMINGUE 
OLIVIA MAROMA 
Assistants to the editor 



TOM WHITEHEAD 
Adviser 

— ; ' : ■ 'v v '- ' ■ 



EDDLEE 
Circulation/ 
Distribution 



i . i n - ■ 



Fall '88 



Current Quotes 



What is your opinion about the 
current lack of parking space? 




Jeff Sadler 
Rosepine 

Freshman, Health and P.E. 

"/ think it is uncalled for, 
to have to park a quarter of a 
mile from the dorm almost eve- 
ryday when people without 
parking permits park in our 
parking lot. I paid far a park- 
ing spot and I want one!" 




Joe Ratcliff 
Shreveport 

Freshman, Advertising and 
Design 

"I say add more parking 
spaces. If we can't do that then 
get me a bulldozer!" 




Billy F. Spillman II 
Tyler, TX 

Freshman, General Studies 

"In my opinion, the en- 
tire parking situation is un- 
real. Get with it faculty, get us 
some space." 




Scott Gill 
Rosepine 

Freshman, Accounting 

"/ think it sucks, because 
I paid to park in Rapides park- 
ing lot and I'm having to park 
in Sabine and walk. I have re- 
ceived several tickets for ille- 
gal parking when there's no 
where else to park. With the 
money we have to pay we should 
have a place to park without 
receiving a ticket." 




Russell Duty 
Alto.TX 

Senior, Wildlife Management 

"There should be no tick- 
ets given until the problem with 
inadequate parking space is 
taken care of." 




Damon Bourque 
Port Sulphur 
Freshman, Drafting 

"The whole situation 
stinks and needs major 
changes. 'Start using that 
money for improvements." 



SEPTEMBER 6, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 6 




Demons shine in first half trampling SMSU; 24-8 



By CHRIS McGEE 
Sports Writer 

For last Saturday night' s Turpin 
Stadium crowd of 12,200, being a 
Demon fan was the only way to go. 

What started as a gloomy fore- 
cast quickly transformed into a jovial 
event The skies cleared, Dolly Par- 
ton performed with the Spirit of North- 
western marching band, and the 
Demons spanked the Southwest Mis- 
souri Bears 24-8 to open the season in 
the win column. 

The Demons put on a football 
clinic in the first half, rolling up a 17- 
half u m e advantage on the strengths 
of a jet-quick offense and a heat-seek- 
ing defensive style. Considering the 
lackluster second half showing, it was 
a good thing. 

After churning out 240 total 
yards on offense in the first half, the 
Demons began to shoot themselves in 
the foot with mass penalties and three 
lost fumbles. 

One would have thought it was 
Flag Day, as NSU was penalized 7 
times for 60 yards in the second-half. 
Sputtering offensively for the last 
quarter and a half, the Demons were 
flagged 12 times for 108 yards. Need- 
less to say, these suicidal tendencies 
prevented the men in purple from total 
obliteration of Southwest Missouri. 

Head coach Sam Goodwin 
stated, "I thought we played real well 
for two and a half quarters. We had 
some critical penalties early that were 
disappointing, but I thought we domi- 
nated for two and a half quarters." 

Indeed they did. The order of 
the day for NSU was abalanced offen- 
sive attack and a "bend but don't 
break" defense. 

The Demons' Dennis Smith 
returned the game's opening kickoff 
to the 1 6 yard line, but NSU turned the 
ball over 4 plays later on a Paul Fra- 
zier fumble off a lateral. The Bears 
recovered on the Demon 26, but 
couldn't capitalize on NSU's gener- 
osity as Chris Potthast's 38 yard field 
goal attempt sailed wide right. 



The Demons took over on their 
22, but were forced to punt 6 plays 
later after the drive stalled. However, 
SMSU's Craig Phillips fumbled the 
punt, and Andre Carron recovered it 
for NSU at the Bear 19. 

Three plays later, Frazier took a 
pitch from Scott Stoker and flew into 
the right comer of the end zone from 
12 yards out for the score. Keith 
Hodnett added the PAT, making it 7- 
Demons. 

For the night, Frazier led all 
Demon rushers with 1 1 carries for 77 
yards as he made his first start as a 
Demon. The5-10, 1901b. sophomore 
also scored two touchdowns in the 
game. 

S MS U took over at their own 27 
and proceeded to march to the Demon 
40, but the NS U defense stiffened and 
forced the Bears to punt 

Then, the Demon offense took 
charge. Starting from their own 11, 
the Demons sustained a 14 play, 89 
yard drive, culminating in a Frazier 7 
yard jaunt to paydirt. Two instrumen- 
tal plays in the drive included a 32 
yard pass from Stoker to Al Edwards 
and a 14 yard strike from Stoker to 
MarkMayfield. Hodnett'sPATmade 
it 14-0 Demons. 

The Bears conservative but 

effective wish-boneattackran 14plays 
in their next series, penetrating De- 
mon territory before the NSU defense 
once again rose to the occasion, thwart- 
ing SMSU's drive. Potthast's43yard 
field goal attempt ran out of gas, and 
NSU took over at their own 26. 

Two series later, that Destruc- 
tive Demon "D" forced another 
fumble, and Steve Compton recov- 
ered the ball at the NSU 44. 

Using pass plays of 19 and 11 
yards and a 12 yard run by Stoker, the 
Demons trudged down to the SMSU 7 
in lOplays before being stopped. Keith 
Hodnett then booted a 25 yard field 
goal for the Demons with 0:07 left in 
the first-half, making it 1 7-0 Demons. 
With that kick, Hodnett becameNSU's 
all-time leading field goal kicker. 



In the third quarter, the Demons 
picked up where they left off. NSU's 
defense flexed its muscles and stopped 
SMSU cold after just three plays in 
the second half s initial drive. SMSU 
punted, giving the Demons excellent 
field position at their own 48. 

Keyed by two Frazier runs of 14 
and 12 yards, NSU advanced to the 
Bear 13, where Rusty Slack threw a 
bullet to Floyd Turner for the score, 
capping an 8 play, 52 yard drive. 
Hodnett added the PAT with 3:52 left 
in the third quarter, bringing the score 
to a commanding 24-0 Demon lead. 

From there, the Demon defense 
took over, preventing SMSU from 
mounting a serious threat for the next 
quarter. It appeared as if the Demons 
would, in fact, obtain their first shut- 
out since 1984 when the ball evaded 
the grasp of NSU's James McKellom 
at the Demon 22. 

The Bears took over and ran a 3 
play drive, ending with quarterback 
Daryl Patton's 6 yard run touchdown 
run. Patton also ran in the two-point 
conversion with 0:47 left in the game 
to bring the score to it's final mark, 
24-8. 

Individually, Stoker led the 
Demon quarterback triumvirate of 
Stoker, Slack, and Gil Galloway in 
passing with 12-16 for 150 of the 
trio's 186 yards. Al Edwards and 
Frazier collaborated for 8 catches and 
99 yards. Orlan Lockhart and Floyd 
Turner extended their streak of at least 
one catch per game to 15 and 11, 
respectively. 

Top defensive stalwarts for NSU 
were Leonard Parker with 16 tackles, 
Kevin Lewis with 2 pass deflections, 
and Steve Compton with 2 fumble 
recoveries. 

As a team, NSU racked up 38 1 
total yards on offense, 195 rushing 
and 186 passing. SMSUrecorded231 
yards of total offense, 1 80 rushing and 
5 1 passing. The Demon defense came 
up with a whopping 5 1/2 sacks. 
SMSU's sporadic play could best be 
marked with their 7 fumbles, 4 of 
which were lost. 



Tracksters prepare for sizzling season 



By BETH BOWMAN 
StaffWriter 

Every fall, thousands of students 
converge upon the campus that is their 
alma mater. Northwestern is no ex- 
ception; it saw many of its students 
return this year. One, however, was 
returning not as a student, but as anew 
member of the faculty. Chris Maggio, 
a Northwestern alumnae from 1985, 
is the new assistant track and field 
coach for the 1988-1989 year. 

Coach Maggio is from Natchi- 
toches, and has coached the previous 
two years at St. Mary's Academy. 
There he was head of the boys' track 
and basketball teams. St Mary's track 
team was district champion both years, 
and was also the state runner up under 
Coach Maggio's guidance. Chris ran 
for Coach Johnson, head coach of 
track and field, during his four years at 
Northwestern. This "made my deci- 
sion easier to come back" (to work for 
Northwestern). 

The fall season starts off with 
cross country running. Cross country 
is distance running of eight kilome- 
ters (five miles). There are seven 
meets throughout the months of Sep- 
tember, October, and November for 
both the men and women' s track team. 
The spring semester will see the be- 
ginning of track and field. These 
meets include a number of events, 
including the javelin, shot put, relays, 
and sprints. Meet dates are set at a 



later time. In both types of competi- 
tion, scoring is done both indivdually 
and by a cumulative team score. The 
men and women's cross country 
schedule is as follows: 

•9\15-Demon Invitational, Natchito- 
ches, 5:00 pm 

•9\24-Louisiana Tech Invitational, 
Ruston, 9:00 am 

•1CN3--NSU Invitational, Natchito- 
ches, 10:00 am 

•1CM4--Stephen F. Austin Invita- 
tional, Nacagdoches, TX, 3:00 pm 

• 10\24--Northeast Invitational, 
Monroe, 3:00 pm 

• 10\31~Southland Conference Meet, 
Natchitoches, 10:00 am 

• 1 l\12-Region 6, Denton, TX, 10:00 
am 

The Southland Conference 
Meet, October 3 1 , is held at a different 
school each year. This year's deci- 
sion to hold it at Northwestern is a 
honor, and one Coach Johnson is 
pleased with. When asked about the 
upcoming season, Coach Johnson 
replied, "We have three home meets 
this year. We are going to be better 
than last year in both the men and 
women's events. We need and want 
the support of the student body." 

The men's cross country track 
team is led by Mark Spikes and Joe 
English, seniors. The other members 
are Mark Troxler, Paul Neyman, Dan 
Ahrens, Ricky Carroll, Duane Patin, 
and Gerard Semien. 



The women's track team con- 
sists of seven members, who are Kate 
Christmas, Patricia Dreher, Kimberly 
Harris, Mary Madison, Denise Miller, 
Vicki Robarge, and Carrie Cook. 
Although not competing yet, the track 
and field teams are already practicing 
for the spring. 

The women's track and field 
team is composed of the seven cross 
country team members joined by Son ja 
Dale, Tiffany Freddie, Suzanne Ful- 
ton, Jennifer Jackson, Yettd James, 
Peggy Lewis, Janet Miller, Janice 
Miller, and Sheryl Payne. 

The men's track and field team 
is made up of the eight men who run 
cross country, with the addition of 
Keith Armond, Shane Abernathy, 
Brent Brown, Brian Brown, Lawrence 
Chatman, Damon Daigle, Ken Dewitt, 
Al Edwards, Todd Hall, Ryan Hebert 

Marcelis Horn, Randy Hillard, Em- 
manuel Gibson, J. J. Eldridge, Chris 
McDonald, Paul Oenbrink, Leonard 
Parker, Keith Poirer, Chad McGloth- 
lin, Adam Pierrier, Jarvan Piper, Greg 
Robertson, John Sampson, Dennis 
S mith , Brett Stagg, Floyd Turner, Glen 
Vercher, Damon West, Charles 
Woods, Sean Brady, and Trey Fulton. 

When asked about this year's 
teams, Coach Maggio replied, "We 
have good athletes here, and we're 
lucky to have them. They represent 
themselves and Northwestern to high 
ideals. We're very proud of them." 




Getting ready for the 
upcoming season's 
intense competition, 
Northwestern's . top 
runners pound the 
pavement at the NSU 
track. The first meet 
will be the Demon 
Invitational to be held 
here in Natchitoches 
on September 15 at 
5:00 p.m. 




De 



ma 

CHRISM 
prts Writer 
For the 
iturday nigh 
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jay be just Itk 
If you 
'olfpackcra< 
jeseasonToi 
ccupied the 
nother team, 
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jenty of fire 
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jthefoldfroi 
in 1987 for 
ig gun is qui 
(ho threw for 
D's in the 
ffensive forr 
Zacchec 
xiver Tony 1 



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mines and N 
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As the defense closes in, tailback James McKellom tries to maneuver past 
Southwest Missouri Bears. The Demons went on to win the game, with a scoW I 
of 24-8. Above: Evading his attackers, Demon quarterback Rusty Slack head 
towards the endzone during the Northwestern football season opener agaim 
Southwest Missouri State University. 



Time Out With Vic 



Demon Fans, 

I told you we were going to KICK BUTT!! 24-8!! We're 
off to a great start. Thanks for all of the Demon Spirit 
you showed throughout the game! 

Our next game is this weekend in Reno. Although I know 
many of you will not be able to attend, I hope you still 
support the Demons by putting up banners and wishing them 
luck all week. Keep your spirit alive!!!! 



I'll be w^ tch in g you , 



Vic the Demon 



Dic£ Vic both P*tyw 

'AN 

.- >'J * fa fx, 

k*> ✓ • vie, . 



DicM cHes drunk . 3>c|c dies. 




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Cm 



PAGE 7 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 6. 1988 




U 




SPORTS 



Demons face big 
matchup in Reno 



iv CHRIS McGEE 
•forts Writer 

For the Demons, facing this 
jiturday night's opponent, the Uni- 
jefsity of Nevada-Reno Wolfpack, 
jay be just like looking in the mirror. 

If you haven't heard, the 
Ifolfpack cracked the Division 1 - AA 
jeseason Top 20 football poll. They 
gcupied the eighteenth spot with 
pother team, the NSU Demons. And 
jist like the Demons, UNR returns 
jlenty of firepower and experience 
'pea last year's squad. 

To be exact, 1 5 starters are back 
a the fold from a team that finished 5- 
Sin 1987 for the Wolfpack. UNR's 
jig gun is quarterback Jim Zaccheo, 
fho threw for over2,000 yards and 15 
p's in the Wolfpack's winged-T 
jffensive formation last year. 

Zaccheo' s favorite target is re- 
aver Tony Logan (5-10, 170), who 



caught 64 passes for 1 ,099 yards and 
12 TD's in 1987. Zaccheo also has 
bruising fullback Charvez Forger to 
hand off to. Last year, Forger de- 
stroyed enemy defenses with 1,132 
yards rushing and 12 TD's in 209 
carries. 

UNR relies on a lethal offensive 
attack, but their defense can be ex- 
ploited. For the Demons to win, the 
offense must cut down on drive-kill- 
ing penalties and capitalize on UNR's 
defensive vulnerability. 
The Demon defense must also come 
through by putting much heat on 
Zaccheo and hope to force errant 
passes for the secondary to corral. 

This game should be an even 
battle, and a victory for the Demons 
may be a great first step in gaining 
some badly needed momentum for 
the rest of the vigorous 1988 sched- 
ule. 



Warming up 

Staying in shape for the spring season, Northwestern 
Demon baseball players sharpen their batting and 
pitching skills during their daily team practice. 





Lady Demons work towards winning volleyball season 



past th T 
i a scorn 
k head 

again* divisionofleisureac- 

TVITIES — NSU's first annual Mud 
Sympic was abig success. On Satur- 

ty, August 27, S AB/Leisure Activi- 

bs sponsored an afternoon of fun in 

* mud. In the first event of the 

flernoon, volleyball. Kappa Sigma 
s their mark in the mud when they 
ir-powered Bossier Hall. In the 
lien's competition Sigma Kappa 
wallowed Tri Sigma to gain a 
ictory. In the second event of the 
ftemoon, tug-o-war, Kappa Alpha 
tit-muscled Kappa Sigma for King 
if the Pit. In the upset of the after- 
ton, Sigma Kappa 2 out-pulled 
figma Kappa 1. 

The 1988-1989 Intramural Sea- 
on will begin with a big splash as the 
"tramural Swim Meet will be held on 
Vednesday,September7,at3:30p.m. 
nthe Recreation Complex. 



NATCHITOCHES— Good 
jrtunes and Northwestern State vol- 
yball are not usually spoken in the 
ime breath, but head coach Rickey 
fcCalister is working on that prob- 
m. 

In his second year as head coach, 
fcCalister returns nine letterwinners 
urn a team that finished 14-13, the 
ist winning record for an NSU vol- 
•yball team , and a fifth place finish in 
K Southland Conference. 

B ut returning letterwinners don 't 
jarantee a winning season, "espe- 
cially this season," according to Mc- 



Calister. An upgrade in the schedule 
to a completely NCAA Division 1 
level means, "we will have to work 
harder this season for a decent record 
than we've ever had to." 

The only personnel loss was 
Annie Bloxson who will be redshirted 
for the season. Bloxson, who finished 
second in the Southland in kills with 
an average of 4.0 a game (372 total — 
a team high), and tenth in attack per- 
centage (.269, also a team high) will 
return for her final year in 1989. 

The loss of Bloxson will defi- 
nitely have an effect on the squad, but 



one player does not a team make. 
McCalister has some power back, plus 
three freshmen, to offset the loss. 

Ready to finish their career in 
the purple and white are seniors Tanya 
Champagne, Dawn Carlos, SonjaDale, 
Kirsten Gernhauser and Colette Jones- 
Horton. All five have been with the 
Lady Demons for four years; Cham- 
pagne, Carlos and Jones-Horton have 
been starters since their freshman 
season, while Dale has been a steady 
player the previous three years. 

Champagne and Jones-Horton 
ranked in the top ten in the conference 



in setting, averaging 3.81 and 2.60 
assists per game respectively. Jones- 
Horton aided the team with a .177 
attack percentage, 26 service aces and 
37 block assists (second on the team). 

Dale, a high jumper on the NSU 
track team, led the squad with 52 solo 
blocks, while Carlos finished tenth in 
kills (2.98 per game) and seventh in 
service aces (.42 per game) in the 
Southland. 

Tammy Mros and Sonja Olsen 
return for their second year. Starting 
last season, Mros led the team with 5 1 
service aces, which ranked her third in 



the SLC. Her 38 block assists were 
also a team high. Olsen, seeing more 
time toward the end of last season, is 
slated to start in Bloxson's place. The 
sophomore from San Diego had 45 
kills and 15 block assists in 1987. 

"None of our girls will be able to 
completely dominate a game and win 
it themselves," added Mac. "We will 
win games as a team, and I think the 
girls realize that. Our attitude is great 
right now, and the freshmen are com- 
ing along fine. They will be able to 
contribute a lot during the season." 

Those freshmen include Janice 



Graham, a 5-10 hitter from Lafayette 
(Carencro High School), Sandi Sher- 
rill, a 5-3 setter from Grand Prairie, 
TX (South Grand Prairie High School) 
and Ladine Thomas, a 5-7 hitter from 
Fort Worth, TX (Castleberry High 
School). 

NSU will open the season Thurs- 
day, September 8 against Southeast- 
em Louisiana in Hammond. Other 
teams on the schedule include nation- 
ally ranked teams Southern Cal-San 
Luis Obispo and Texas- Arlington, with 
tournaments at Mississippi State and 
LSU. 



SU plans fall intramural games 



Intramural Flag Football season 
willkickoffThursday.September 15, 
with a Flag Football Jamboree at 3 : 30 
p.m. on the ROTC field and the Intra- 
mural field. All teams that are inter- 
ested in participating in the Jamboree 
should notify the Intramural office 
when they turn in their team entry 
card. There will be three leagues: 
Greek, Dormitory, and Open for both 
men and women. The Greek league is 
open to all students who live in on- 
campus facilities. Each Dormitory 
team will be allowed two additional 
team members that do not reside in a 
dormitory. The open league is open to 
all NSU students, faculty, and staff. 

Games will be played Monday 
through Thursday on the R.O.T.C. 
fields and the Intramural fields at 3: 30 
p.m. and 4:30 p.m. There will be a 
mandatory team captains meeting on 



Wednesday, September 14, and 7:00 
p.m. in the IM/Rec. Building. A rep- 
resentative from each team must at- 
tend or the team will not be scheduled 
for competition. 

The Leisure Activities Office is 
looking for student officials to offici- 
ate Intramural Team Sports for the 
1988-1989 school year. Officials are 
needed in Flag Football, Volleyball, 
Basketball, and Softball. Come join 
the NSU Intramural Officials Asso- 
ciation and become part of the Intra- 
mural Staff Force. The Flag Football 
Officials Clinic will begin Wednes- 
day, September 7, at 7:00 p.m. in the 
Teacher Education Building, Pod C, 
Room 113. If you are interested in 
being an official contact the Intramu- 
ral Office, Room 10, IM/Rec. Build- 
ing or call 357-5461. 



Remodeled IM building offers much 



y EDDIE BRIGGS 
Writer 

Students interested in such ac- 
lties as golf, baseball, basketball, 
tool, gymnastics, weightlifting and 
ideo games can find it all plus more 
^ide the newly remodeled Intramu- 
WRecreation building. 



Constructed in 1935as the men's 
nasium, the building was used 
Wmarily to accommodate varsity 
"tieac events and house the men's 
"ysical education classes. 

After the construction of mod- 
J 11 athletic facilities such as Prather 
^liseum and the P.E. Majors build- 
% the old men's gymnasium as- 
^ed the new role of accommodat- 



ing the recreational and entertainment 
needs of the entire NSU student body. 

Leisure Activities Director Dr. 
Gene Newman and graduate assistant 
Nona Lodridge began supervising 
building improvements during fall 
1987. Newman and Lodridge and 
assisting student workers renovated 
office areas, repaired the racquetball 
courts, painted several rooms and 
improved many other areas of the 53- 
year-old building. 

One popular renovation in- 
cludes a new gameroom housing two 
ping-pong tables, two pool tables, a 
fooseball table and assorted video 
games. Newman soon plans to add a 
"blue room" where students can play 
cards and other quiet games. 



Although the IM building con- 
tains many changes, it continues to 
house a gymnasium, a gymnastics area, 
four racquetball courts and a weight- 
room. Other facihties include an equip- 
ment room where students can check 
out a wide variety of athletic equip- 
ment and the canoe shed on Chaplin's 
Lake which provides wind surfers, 
sail boats, canoes and paddleboats. 
All these facilities are provided free to 
any NSU student who presents an ID 
card. 

The IM building is open 8:00 
a.m.-9:00p.m. Monday through Thurs- 
day, 8:00a.m.-5:00 p.m. Friday, 2:00- 
6:00p.m. Saturday and2:00-9:00p.m. 
Sunday. The canoe shed is open from 
2:30-5:30 p.m. every day except Fri- 
day. 



Good Luck 





S CLSS 




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Monday Nite Football 
754 Draft 
Tuesday 
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Wednesday 
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SEPTEMBER 6, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 8 



CAMPUS LINE 



Wesley Foundation 

The Wesley Foundation is the 
Methodist Student Center located at 
520 College Ave. across from Alumni 
Center. Persons of any denomination 
are invited to visit The director is 
Rev. Ryan Horton and the assistant 
director/counselor is Mickie 
Townsend. 

The Foundation is off to a run- 
ning start this year and has already 
planned a busy fall semester. Weekly 
activities include Monday night 
movies at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday lunch- 
eons from 11:30 am. to 12:30 p.m. 
and Wednesday night recreation at 
the First United Methodist Church on 
Second St with rollerskating, volley- 
ball, basketball, etc. There are also 
informal, non-denominational chapel 
services at 5 p.m. on Sundays fol- 
lowed by dinner. 

All of the above activities are 
free except for the Tuesday lunch- 
eons. These luncheons only cost 50 
cents per meal. The members of the 
Wesley Foundation would like to 
encourage everyone to join in any or 
all of the activities offered. 

At the fall planning session the 
newly elected officers were as fol- 
lows: Frank Rosamond, president; 
Mike Townsend, vice president; 
Robert Gunn, secretary/treasurer, Beth 
Hastings, publicity chairman; and 
Russell Parkin, programming chair- 
man. Monitors for weeknights are 
Karissa Estes, Earnest Vinson and 
Russell Parkin. 

Everyone is welcome to go by 
and visit. The Wesley Foundation 
hours are 8 a.m.-9 p.m. on Monday- 
Thursday; 8 a.m.-5 p.m. on Friday; 
closed on Saturday and 4 p.m.-9 p.m . 
on Sunday. 



Potpourri 

The Potpourri staff meetings 
will be every Tuesday at 4 and 6 p.m. 
inRm.225KyserHall. 



SAM 

The Society for Advancement 
of Management (SAM) will meet on 
Thursday, Sept 8 at 11 a.m. in Rm. 
102 in the business building. Every- 
one is invited to attend. 



Lecture series 

Dr. Arthur Schlesinger will 
speak on Thursday September 28 at 
11:00 a.m. The topic will be the 
Cycles of American History. 

Phi Alpha Theta 

The Phi Alpha Theta International 
Honor Society in history will meet 
Thursday in Rm. 149 of Keyser Hall 
at 11:00 a.m.. Topics to be discussed 
will include officer elections and the 
arrival of Arthur Schlesinger. 



Purple Jackets 

The next Purple Jackets meet- 
ing will be Thursday, Sept. 15 at 5 
p.m. Important business will be dis- 
cussed. 



SGA 

The deadline for Homecoming 
Court nominations and senator peti- 
tions is Wednesday, Sept 7 at 4:30 
p.m . in Rm . 309 in the Student Union.. 



SAB 

Anyone interested in working 
on the Public Relations and Advertis- 
ing Committee of the Student Activi- 
ties Board should go by the SAB of- 
fice in the Student Union Thursday at 
11:00 a.m. 



Scholars' College 

The Student Life Enrichment 
Committee of the Louisiana Schol- 
ars' College is sponsoring a series of 
"talk-shows" to be held monthly 
beginning September 19. The first 
topic will be mandatory drug-testing 
in the workplace. For more informa- 
tion contact a member of the Student 
Life Committee or call the Scholars* 
College at 357-4579. 



Greeks 

Greek Expressions will be at the 
Tri-Sigma house today at 3:30 p.m. 
All greeks are invited to visit. 



Panhellenic 

Panhellenic meetings will be 
every Thursday at 6 p.m. in the SAB 
conference room in the Student Un- 
ion. 



Tri-Sigma 

The Alpha Zeta Chapter of 
Sigma Sigma Sigma would like to 
offer congratulations to their new fall 
pledge officers. They are as follows: 
Rhonda Regouffre, president; Beth 
Bowman, secretary; Anjanette Lee, 
treasurer; and Mary Claire Harkins, 
parliamentarian. 



Current Sauce 

The Current Sauce staff meet- 
ings will be every Tuesday at 5 p.m. in 
Rm. 225 Kyser Hall. 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 

The brothers of Tau Kappa 
Epsilon welcome the following men 
as associate members: John Aguon, 
Chuck Bailey, John Baten, Robert 
Childers, Alex Clark, Doug DuBois, 
Shannon Scott Gill, Larry Hair, Brian 
Hairell, Buddy Hays, Raymond Hay- 
mon, Charles Hollinger III, Mitchell 
Hornsby, Perry Levet, Mark Norton, 
Paul Palmer, Robert Rushford, Jeff 
Saddler, Danny Schneider, Johnny 
Warner, Charles Roppolojr., Buck 
Taylor, Charles Upchurch and Ronald 
Wiggins. They would also like to 
congratulate Damon Land for being 
elected as secretary and David Norton 
as historian. Clay Meyers is the 
fraternity's new graduate adviser. 



Sigma Tau Gamma 

The brothers of Sigma Tau 
Gamma would like to announce and 
congratulate their fall pledges. They 
are Morgan Allison , Brent Craig, Greg 
Ezernack, Roberto Flores, Steve Her- 
nandez, John Hooter and Norris 
Whitford. 



Kappa Alpha 

Kappa Alpha Order would like 
to congratulate the new fall pledge 
class officers. They are Steve Wolfe, 
president; Chris Carter, vice presi- 
dent; and Jay Ingram, secretary. 



Sigma Kappa 

Sigma Kappa will host a car wash 
Saturday, Sept. 24 at Mr. Gatti's from 
1 1 a.m.-2 p.m. Tickets will be sold 
until the car wash at two dollars per 
ticket 

The Delta Mu Chapter would like 
to congratulate their new pledge class 
officers. They are as follows: Chrys- 
tal Everett, president; Amanda Ri- 
dley, vice-president; Monica Billiot, 
secretary; Sara Tinker, treasurer; 
Brenda Nickerson, social chairman; 
Keitha Broussard, activities chairman; 
Karen Middleton, scholarship chair- 
man; Nichole Eagleston, Pam Miller, 
junior Panhellenic; Laurie LaCour, 
Jennifer d'Aquin, and philanthropy; 
Charmaine Decker, spirit 



Phi Mu 

Phi Mu is raffling a Samurai 
Jeep. Any interested persons should 
con tac t a Phi Mu active or provisional 
member. Five dollars will allow a 
person two chances at winning the 
jeep. 

Phi Mu would also tike to an- 
nounce that Karen Shadow is a mem- 
ber of the Fall 1988 pledge class. 
Congratulations! 



FCS 

The Fellowship of Christian 
Students will be meeting every Wed- 
nesday, starting Sept 7. The meetings 
will run from 7 p.m. til 8:30 p.m. in 
Rm. 320 of the Student Union. Every- 
one is welcome and encouraged to 
attend. 



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y BETH BOW] 
bffWriter 

Beginning 
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irthwestern Lou 
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y EDDIE BRK 
WWriter 



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SEPTEMBER 13, 1988 NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 

OF LOUISIANA 



VOL 77, NO. 7 



Northwestern students film Steel Magnolias scene 



~— --} ANN MILLER 

ETRESSlflrHWter 
-TIME 

J. EXP- "Alotmoregoesintoshcx)tinga 

fHVT V * ne ^ or a mov ' e mat most P eo Plc 
* ould imagine." said Rodney Fulton, 
PLY. no played the role of Bobby Ray in 

DING * snootm 8 °f tne $ tee l Magnolias 

otball locker room scene. 
SOUTIT Due to NCAA rules the demon 
7Q a the carpet in the field house and the 

<mes on the lockers had to be cov- 

The scene was shot on Friday, 
pt.9 at North western's field house. 

The young men who were cast 
r the scene began arriving at 6:45 
(in. with filming beginning until 9 
and lasting until 6 p.m. For the 
it several takes the football players 
ere required to scream and yell, but 
the majority of the time the players 
to pantomime. 
"It got monotonous from doing 
same thing over and over as they 
t the scene from different angles, 
I got to speak with the actresses," 
id Sean Mayfield. 

The pay scale for those cast was 
ifollows: $50 for those in uniform; 
100 dollars for jock strap only; $ 1 50 
ollars for unclothed and around $400 
ollars for the character of Bobby 
ay. ThecharacterofBobbyRay was 
speaking part and his lines consisted 
["Yea! Good! We won!" 

"I was not nervous at all; the 
Wple and the director, Herbert Ross, 
ie nice and they made it easy ."said 
to. 

Wins ton Howard , an NS U cheer- 
ader who was cast, said, "It was fun 
rthe first 4 or 5 hours but it got old. 



I will never do that again for $50 
dollars. But I was real impressed with 
Shirley MacLaine. She was very down 
to earth and incredibly funny." All of 
the cheerleaders who were cast took 
pictures with Olympia Dukakis. 

B uddy Hays, who was unclothed 
during the shooting, said, "It was 
strange walking around that many 
people with no clothes but after the 
first take I got used to it. Even though 
it got tiring it will be worth it when the 
movie comes out. I thought Shirley 
MacLaine's personality was incred- 
ible. She makes the scene." 

During the course of the day 
those cast received 5 or 6 breaks that 
were 5 to 8 minutes long and 30 min- 
utes for lunch. Lunch was provided 
by the movie company at the P.E. 
Majors Building. They were served 
broiled lamb chops, chicken Kiev, 
and pasta Alfredo. 

Ronnie Wiggins said, "It was 
fun but it was for 1 1 hours and I would 
not do it again." 

Since the scene was set right 
after a playoff game, it was necessary 
for the football players to appear rather 
dirty and sweaty. To achieve this ef- 
fect, the players were rubbed down 
with a mixture of parsley and brown 
dirt. They were also constantly being 
sprayed down with water for the 
sweaty effect. 

All Dukes ofHazzard fans will 
be glad to know Cletus, Rick Hurst, 
plays the radio announcer in this scene. 
This scene which took around 1 1 hours 
to film and weeks of preparation will 
run around 3 minutes in the movie 
Steel Magnolias. 





(above) Enjoying the comply, Steel Magnolias star Olympia Dukakis takes a minute to pose with extras Rob Breutch, 
Brad Arnold, Steve Wolfe, Scott Haley, Winston Howard, and Sidney Rogers, (upper right) Taking a break from their 
duties as "background artists," Brad Arnold and Dan Pickett work on their all-over tan outside the fieldhouse. (lower 
right) "But what's my motivation?" asks Jim Cobb as he and another extra discuss the locer room scene. 



^ive plays to be presented 



Louisiana Repertory Theatre schedules quality performances 



yBETH BOWMAN 
iff Writer 

Beginning October 7, Louisi- 
sa will see the start of an unique 
adertaking in theater. Northwestern 
iate University and the citizens of 
orthwestern Louisiana are establish- 
ig a resident professional theater 
toipany, the Louisiana Repertory 
heatre. The thearer will meet the 
! gion's desire for quality perform- 
Jces and educational programs. 

The organization forming the 
^ui siana Repertory Theatre company 
' Horse Cave Theatre of Kentucky, 
'hich has presented 12 seasons of 
flality theatrical productions and 
tocational programs to a total audi- 
'ce of 150,000. 

The plays chosen to be shown 



in Louisiana will have a previous run 
in Kentucky, with the exception of the 
last play, The Dickens Christmas Carol 
Show. The plays will run from Octo- 
ber 7 to December 4"; 

The season is designed so that 
those coming to see all five plays will 
have a unique experience each visit. 
The plays include a farce, a drama, a 
comedy, a tragedy, and a Christmas 
play. 

The first play is a farce by 
Michael Frayn, entitled Noises Off. A 
farce is distinguished from comedy by 
its emphasis on plot, the simplicity of 
characters, and the implication that 
the world is a mechanism out of our 
control. Noises Off is a behind the 
scenes look at the antics of a third-rate 
British acting troupe touring a ghastly 



sex farce through the small towns of 
England. 

The comedy is HerbGardner's 
I'm Not Rappaport. This play cap- 
tures the essence of aging with comic 
rage and piercing realism. The direc- 
tor, Michael Wainstein, writes, "Nat 
and Midge are very special. Not only 
have they survived into their 80's, but 
they continue to lead full lives. This is 
the key to the play; they both treasure 
life, and inspire me to treasure my life. 
They tell me that the present, fully 
experienced, can continue to enrich 
the future." 

The third play is a Pulitzer 
Prize winner by EugeneO'Neill.Anna 
Christie is both a powerful drama and 
a love story. It is the tale of a father and 
his long-lost daughter being reunited. 



"The play is about painful pasts, re- 
grets, and the struggle for honesty, 
which can bring about goodness, for- 
giveness, and reconciliation," writes 
Laura Fine, the director of Anna 
Christie. 

Romeo and Juliet, one of 
William Shakespeare's numerous 
tragedies, has a two-fold purpose for 
this season. It is shown as both the 
fourth play, and as the Louisiana 
Repertory Theatre's Educational 
Outreach Program. This program helps 
to bring the printed word to life. 

The theatre is happy to pres- 
ent this program to the students of the 
northwest/central Louisiana parishes. 
Each fall, thousands of young people 
will have the opportunity to experi- 
ence live theater. 



The last play, which will run 
from November 25 to December 4, is 
The Dickens Christmas Carol Show, 
by Arthur Scholey featuring the music 
of the season. This delightful adapta- 
tion of Charles Dickens' A Christmas 
Carol, will only be seen in Louisiana. 
Local auditions will be held Tuesday, 
October 1 1 and Wednesday, October 
12 from 1p.m. to 5. 

"This really is an unique 
undertaking, the collaboration of a 
professional theatre company and a 
university in presenting a wonderful 
season of theater. There is something 
for everyone," Lillian Taylor, admin- 
istrative liaison, commented. 

"The actors will be housed on 



campus. Each member of the theatre 
has been sent a packet of information 
on Northwestern State University, 
Natchitoches, and local facilities to 
acquaint them with the city. The 
Chamber of Commerce office was very 
helpful in putting this together with 
me, " Ms. Taylor also added. "We 
want them to feel welcome, and real- 
ize the support there is for this under- 
taking. " 

Working on publicity and the 
subscription campaign is Tony 
Armento. Armento is working with 
the Repertory Theatre as a marketing 
consultant, for the fall season only. He 
graduated from the Yale School of 
Drama, with a three year graduate 
program. 



Free seminar planned 
for local handicapped 



Neddie briggs 

<<tff Writer 



The New Horizon Independent 
■'Wng Center of Shreveport will be 
inducting a free peer counseling 
^"inar at Natchitoches Vocational 
^ool (Votech) from 9:30 a.m. to 4 
'•■"•.Tuesday .Wednesday andThurs- 
fy. September 27-29. 

Designed to improve thequality 
Wife for disabled persons, the semi- 
^ will deal with such issues as stress 
^agement, self-advocacy and dis- 
^ility awareness, and will be con- 
Jjcted by staff psychologist, Dr. J. B. 
^ilds. 

New Horizon, one of only 15 
programs in the United States, is 
^ first group in Louisiana to conduct 
^dicapped seminars in rural par- 
ses. Parishes hosting the free semi- 
.^s include Webster, Claiborne, 



Lincoln, Bienville, Red River, Desoto, 
Sabine and Natchitoches. 

The seminar is funded through a 
developmental disabilities grant to 
New Horizon Rural Outreach Pro- 
gram, so participants will only be 
responsible for their lunch, and a com - 
fortable place will be available for 
"brown bagging," if desired. 

All disabled persons between the 
ages of 18-55 are invited, regardless 
of how minor or extreme the disabil- 
ity, including emotional and substance 
abuse. Also invited are those who 
work with handicapped persons, and 
those interested in helping in any way. 
Such persons may include nursing 
and physical therapy majors. 

You may register by calling 
Votech at 357-3162, Monday-Friday 
or by contacting Ruth Mahaffy or 
Mary Dunn at New Horizon I. L. C, 
4030 Wallace Avenue, Shreveport, 
LA 71 108, 635-3652. 



Intramural swim meet sets new Northwestern records 



NORTHWESTERN— On 
Wednesday, September 7th the first 
money sport, Intramural Swim Meet 
was held at the Recreation Complex. 
New Intramural Swim Meet records 
were set in 1 3 out of the 1 6 events that 
were held. In the Men's 100m Med- 
ley Relay, Kappa Sigma took first 
place with a time of 1 :01 .7 to beat last 
year's record with a time of 1:04.26. 
In the women's 100m Medley Relay, 
Tri Sigma set a new record with a time 
of 1 :43 .63. With a time of 1 1 :45 in the 
men's 25m Freestyle, Rich Grizzie of 
Kappa Sigma beat last year's record 
of 12:07. 

In the women's 25m Freestyle, 
Kriston Hicks of Phi Mu beat last 
year's time of 15:98 with a time of 
14:41. Kelly Sulivan ofKappaSigma 
captured first place in the men's 25m 
Breaststroke with a time of 17:06. 
Suzanne Fulton of Tri Sigma came in 
firstinthe women's25m Breaststroke 



with a time of 18:44. In the men's 
25m Butterfly, William Foiani of 
Theta Chi won first place with a time 
of 14:06. Kriston Hicks ofPhiMu set 
a new record with a time of 15:35 in 
the women's Butterfly. William 
Foiani won his second event of the 
afternoon with a time of 35:27 in the 
men's 50m Breaststroke. RichGizzie 
of Kappa S igma won his second event 
when he seta new record in the men's 
25m Breaststroke. 

Kriston Hicks also won her 
second event of the afternoon setting 
a new record in the women's 25m 
Backstroke with a time of 16:96. Tri 
Sigma's Suzanne Fulton set a new 
record in the women's 50m 
Breaststroke with a time of 43:58. In 
the men's50m Freestyle, Rich Griz- 
zie won his third event of the evening 
with a time of 24:55. In the women's 
50m Freestyle, Suzanne Fulton cap- 
tured another first place victory for 



Tri Sigma with a time of 38:72. In the 
last event oi the evening, the 100m 
Freestyle Relay , Kappa Sigma and Tri 
Sigma came out on top to give their 
team a first place win in the meet. 

This year's football season will 
kick off with a jamboree on Thursday, 
September 15 at 3:30p.m. on the 
ROTC and Intramural fields. All teams 
are encouraged to come out and take 
the opportunity to test their strategy 
checking out the competition. 

A mandatory flag football team 
captain's meeting will be held on 
Wednesday, September 14th at 7:00 
p.m. in room 114 of the Intramural 
Building. All teams who wish to be 
represented as well as those who wish 
to participate on teams should be 
present The purpose of this meeting 
will be to allow officials and players 
to rules and procedures. Teams may 
sign now forremaining available time 
slots. Each team may play in a maxi- 



mum of two time slots. Game slots 
start at3:30p.m. Thursday with teams 
playing every half hour. Schedule 
competition begins Monday, Septem- 
ber 19. 

The leisure activities department 
will sponsor a weekend of Co-Rec. 
flag football September 23 and 24. 
Teams will consist of 8 players — 4 
men and 4 women. The entry dead- 
line for teams is Monday, September 
19. 

Saturday, September 17, the 
NSU Leisure Activities Department 
will sponsor its second annual IM 
Beach Day on Chaplin's Lake from 
lp.m.-4p.m. Activities include: 3 
person volleyball, 2 person canoe 
races, 1 women canoe races, a frisbee 
golf tournament, pedal boat races and 
a chug-a-lug contest Plaques will be 
awarded to all winners. KNWD will 
be on hand for a live broadcast. Don't 
miss an afternoon of music, prizes, 
food, beverages, fun and sun. 



■ — 



PAGE 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 13, 1988 




Northwestern appoints Ledford 
into new fundraising position 



By MICHELLE WEEGO 
Managing Editor 

Microbiology research, Var- 
nado Hall renovations, and develop- 
men. of the Louisiana Scholars' Col- 
lege program all have one thing in 
common — they need large amounts 
of money to exist and expand on 
Northwestern's campus. 

This need for program funding 
has created the new position of offi- 
cial fundraiser for Northwestern, re- 
cently filled by NSU graduate Harold 
Ledford. 

A native of Sabine Parish, 
Ledford graduated from Northwest- 
ern State College in 1968 with a 
masters degree in education. After 
teaching in both Caddo Parish and 
Dallas, Texas, Ledford served four 
years in Washington, D.C., as a senior 
consultant for the Office of Educa- 
tion. Among his other credits are such 
jobs as high school principal, central 
office personnel and consultants for 
both the Ford and the Clark Founda- 
tion. In addition, Ledford has worked 
with school systems in gaining grants 
and funding for programs. 

Out of that experience, Ledford 
applied for the position of Northwest- 
em State University's fundraiser. 
Because of the diversity of the pro- 
grams being created on campus and 
the competition of other Louisiana 
schools, Northwestern found it a ne- 
cessity to develop this new fundrais- 
ing position. 

"I was excited about being cho- 
sen for this job because of three rea- 
sons," Ledford said. "First, I am a 
graduate of Northwestern. Secondly, 
I have fulfilled my dream of coming 
back to the campus to do something 
for the school. And finally, I feel this 
college is really on the move. So 
many positive things are happening 
right now, so there's a definite need 
for more funding." 

"Since I've been here, I've 
looked at almost all the programs on 
campus. As the priorities and needs of 
these programs become more evident 



I begin looking for the appropriate 
fundings," Ledford said. 

"Northwestern has a good op- 
portunity to see a lot of money from 
grants. My job is to inform people on 
campus of funds that are available 
from the government, foundations and 
corporations, then to assist them; in 
getting those funds so they can pout 
them into action," Ledford said. 
"Various areas on campus can use 
these grants for research funding, 
renovations and development of cur- 
riculum." 

"We also need a way to develop 
a consistent way to raise money. 
Northwestern has so much going for it 
right now that I am having no trouble 
finding companies who are eager to 
give funding," Ledford said. 

Examples of his work include 
funding for a substance abuse pro- 
gram under the Student Life Division 
and discussions with the Ethel Corpo- 
ration in funding the Scholars' Col- 
lege. 

Ledford also plans to put out an 
"NSU Grant Alert" which will list 
college program grants. This will 
allow Northwestern programs become 



aware of what funding is available. 
Then Ledford will assist interested 
programs in applying for these grants. 

Although Ledford is taking his 
job seriously, he believes that fun- 
draising is not everything. "You can 
have all the money in the world but 
it's no good without great programs 
and people — and that's just what 
Northwestern has and continues to 
work for." 



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THURSDAY - 2 for 1 BAR DRINKS Tiki Bowls 
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FRIDAY - BUDWEISER BEER BUST $5.00 

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BOXOFFICE AND ASK FOR THE DEMON NIGHT SPECIAL. 

$atfcfoay Cinema 

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CALL 352-5109 
FOR FEATURE INFORMATION AND TIMES. 



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That s what the Louisiana Investor- 
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Louisiana graduates to be— wanted 
for permanent, well-paid jobs in 
tdusrry and business statewide. 
But the jobs you and the rest of 
m& Class of *89 will be applying for 
may be the product of an industrial 



development initiative that began 
when you were to the first grade. 
Industrial development is a long-term 
undertaking. And Louisiana'selectric 
utilities are very committed to it. 

Right now, we're working on initia- 
tives that will benefit the Class of '09. 
Your kids. That is planning ahead! 




Investing in you' energy future 




Central Louisiana Electric Company/Gulf States Utilities Company 
Louisiana Power & Light Company/New Orleans Public Service Inc 
Southwestern Electric Power Company 




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PAGE 3 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 13, 1988 



*JEWS 











jA Freshman Senator 

K\\ freshmen vote for two 





SGA Senator -at-Large 

All students 
vote for two 



J, 
mi 



My name is Paulette 
Basco. I am running for the 
isition of Freshman Senator, 
feel that, if elected, I can best 
represent the freshman class 
with your interests and con- 
kerns in mind! I will do all I 
can to see that legislation in- 
volving the betterment of our 
university is passed. I will 
appreciate your vote on Wed- 
nesday, September 14. I will 
work for you and NSV. 



szas 



Crust 

as. 



ting 



'23/88 



/, Nickole Eagleston, 
would like to run for Freshman 
senator. I feel that anyone that 
applies for this position should 
have some background in gov- 
ernment-related experience. I 
served on Student Council for 
three years. I don't feel that 
this alone qualifies me for 
running, but the fact that I love 
people and always have their 
best interests in mind does. 

I would like to represent 
my class and voice their opin- 
ions in what goes on around 
school. 



As Freshman Senator, I 
believe that I could make a dif- 
ference in the things that effect 
the students ofNSU. I want to 
help the students to help them- 
selves. I have earned experi- 
ence for this position by serv- 
ing as Vice-President of my 
high school SGA and by repre- • 
senting my school on the 
Natchitoches Mayor's Youth 
Council. I am easy to work 
with and I am willing to help 
anyone whenever possible. 
With my experience and my 
strong desire to serve the stu- 
dents ofNorthwestern.I will be 
a great choice for your Fresh- 
man Senator. 



I, Staci Jo Klotzbach, 
being a freshman here at North- 
western State University, am 
very excited about running for 
freshman class senator. I have 
met many fellow students and 
with the upcoming events 
planned, I would appreciate 
the chance to serve you in the 
Student Government Associa- 
tion. 



SGA and Homecoming Court elections will be held on Wednesday, September 14, 
in the Student Union Lobby from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. All students must have 

a Northwestern ID in order to vote. 



lomecoming Court 

11 students 




vote for nine 



Cindy Bethel 




^Tonia Digirolamo 





Christie Brown 




Elaine Burleigh 




Robert Bennett 




I feel that with my exten- 
sive background in organiza- 
tion, planning, and public re- 
lations I can help you, the stu- 
dents, obtain what you want 
most from college in general, 
and Northwestern in particu- 
lar. At the same time, this will 
helpNSU to grow and develop 
into the type of institution it is 
striving to be. I ask you to 
support me in this election and 
guarantee that I will do my best 
to fulfill the duties and obliga- 
tions of this position. 



No Statement 
Submitted 




Melinda Emanuel 




No 
Statement 
Submitted 



VvebeenatNSU for some 
time and now am ready to take 
an active part in its student 
government. I've seen how 
thingsworkandhow they don't. 
I want to help improve or cor- 
rect situations at NSU. I will 
always keep the best interests 
of the students in mind and will 
not tolerate pressure from any 
group or administration to vote 
otherwise. But I cannot make 
my voice heard unless elected; 
therefore, I would really ap- 
preciate your vote. 

Thanks, Ronnie 



No Picture Submitted 
Carla Frisby 








Sherry Farley 




Melissa Frank 




Kirsten Gernhauser 




Shwu-Fen Lee 




H 

wis-: 



Katrina Lloyd 




Andrea Madison 




Mary Miller 




Sonya Rigaud 





Toni Rosenthal 




Cindy Ross 






Yolanda Williams 




SEPTEMBER 13, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 4 



NEWS 








1 













EDIT* 



Student employment raises questions research papers 

A •/ A. 16^78 to choose from— all subjects 



By LAURIE LeBLANC 
Staff Writer 

The student employment pro- 
gram has undergone drastic changes 
over the past four years causing stu- 
dents to question the system. 

Many students returning this 
semester received quite a shock to 
disscover they no longer posesssed a 
student job. 

Workers in the housing depart- 
ment were affected the most due to 
budget changes. 



"It's a shame that girls that live in 
our residence halls cannot be em- 
ployed there. Now it's strangers," 
said Rhondi Sandifer, sophomore 
from Baton Rouge. 

The financial aid department is 
now in the process of training Marilyn 
Hailey. Hailey will be in charge of 
student job placement in the future. 
There are hopes to incorporate a job 
system based on class status, giving 
seniors the better jobs and so on down 
the line. 

"Wereward quality," said Geor- 



gia Beasley, Director of Admissions. 
Beasley explained the criteria for job 
placement and retainment. "Incom- 
ing freshman are required to have at 
least a 23 ACT score. People who 
haave federal financial aid or a pell 
grant are eligible for student job place- 
ment. And, to retain a student work 
study job you must make a 2.5 each 
semester," said Beasley. 

"Thepercentageof students who 
are juniors and seniors that have jobs 
is much higher than that of freshmen 



and sophomores," added Ms. Bea- 
sley. 

Terry Faust, Director of Finan- 
cial Aid, also voiced his concern over 
the welfare of the students. 

"I've had many sleepless nights 
worrying about the student job situ- 
ation. We are doing everything that 
we can," says Faust. He added, "We 
haven't forgotten about the students. 
We are in it for the students." 

All questions should be directed 
to Terry Faust or Gil Gilson in the 
financial aid department in Roy Hall. 



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Phi Alpha Theta 

NORTHWESTERN— The 

International Honor Society in His- 
tory, Phi Alpha Theta, was organized 
at the University of Arkansason March 
17, 1921. Since that time it has grown 
to over six hundred and fifty chapters 
in fifty states, Puerto Rico, Canada, 
and the Philippines. It is the largest in 
number of the accredited honor socie- 
ties holding membership in the Asso- 
ciation of College Honor Societies. 

A viablesociety.Phi Beta Theta 
is composed of chapters in properly 
accredited colleges and universities. 
All students in these institutions, who 
have completed the required number 
of History courses and are maintain- 
ing high standards in their college or 
university studies, are eligible for 
membership. At Northwestern under- 
graduate requirements for member- 
ship include twelve hours of basic 
History (1010, 1020, 2010, 2020) and 
one upper level course. We will in- 
duct new members on Tuesday, Sep- 
tember 20, at 11:00. If anyone is 
interested in joining or learning more 
about this you can call 357-6848 or 
357-6593. 

If you are a History major or just 
interested in History and don't meet 
the requirements, feel free to come to 
the meetings or activities. Phi Alpha 
Theta seeks to bring students, teach- 
ers, and writers of History together 
both intellectually and socially. 



Orientation 
workshop 

The Center for Career Planning 
and Placement is maintained by North- 
western State University for the bene- 
fit of its students. 

The Center is sponsoring an 
orientation workshop for fall, spring 
and summer graduates on Tuesday, 
Sept. 13 from 11 a.m. until 12 noon 
and Wednesday, Sept. 14 from 3 until 
4 p.m. These one-hour orientation 
sessions explain the WHO?, WHAT?, 
WHEN?, WHERE?, and HOW? of 
the services and resources of the 
Center. A tour of the office complex 
includes the Center's library, job 
search directories, job listings, sign- 
up books for on-campus interviews, 
etc. Students should try to attend one 
of the sessions listed. 

Individual appointments can be 
arranged for those students whose 
schedules will not permit attendance 
to one of these sessions. Packets for 
registration may be obtained in the 
Center at any time. Early registration 
will assure a personal file being ready 
for the first interviews. 

The Center for Career Planning 
and Placement is located in the Stu- 
dent Union Rm. 305. The phone 
number is 357-5621. 



Distinguished Lecture Series 

Schlesinger to appear 
here at Northwestern 



By SHANNON BOUFFANIE 
StaffWriter 

Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., his- 
torian and writer, will speak on Thurs- 
day, Sept. 22 at 1 1 a.m. in the Fine 
Arts Auditorium as part of the Distin- 
guished Lecture Series. His topic will 
be the cycle of history. 

Schlesinger graduated summa 
cum laude from Harvard in 1938 and 
after serving five years in the United 
S tates Army, he returned as Associate 
Professor of History in 1946. He was 
promoted to Professor of History in 
1954 and remained there until 1961 
when he began his three year term as 
Special Assistant to President John F. 
Kennedy. 

Schlesinger was twice awarded 
the Pulitzer Prize — in 1946 for his- 
tory and in 1966 for biography. He 
also received the National Book 
Award twice — in both 1966 and 1979. 

In 1973 he received both the 
Sidney Hillman Foundation Award 
and the Ohio Governor's Award for 



History, followed in 1974 by the 
Eugene V. Debs Award in the Field of 
Education. Schlesinger was awarded 
in Italy in 1983 the Fregene Prize for 
Literature. 

Equally as impressive as his list 
of awards is his list of writings. Sch- 
lesinger served as co-editor of the 
Harvard Guide to American History 
in 1954. 

Over a period of four years, he 
wrote three volumes on The Age of 
Roosevelt : vol.1, The Crisis of the 
Old Order ; vol.2, The Coming of the 
New Deal; vol.3, The Politics of Up- 
heaval. Schlesinger also did numer- 
ous writings on the Kennedys such as 
Kennedy or Nixon; A Thousand 
Days John F. Kennedy in the White 
House; and Robert Kennedy and His 
Times. In 1968 he wrote Violence: 
America in the Sixties followed by 
The Crisis of Confidence in 1969. 

Admission to the lecture is free 
of charge to Northwestern students 
and the general public. 



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Natchitoches, LA 



BRAD B< 
tff Writer 

It seems 
; enough n< 
people in it 
jhways are 
estemis ove 
e just too m 
omuch oft 
But unl 
liversities c 
omany peo 
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at it could t 
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Who£ 
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Thise 
i this elec 
Getoi 
fnd to this 



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faB and$j 
ern State 
with any 
nancedi 

Th© 
Student I 
of the ©d 
The advi 
5213. 

Th© 
Box 530$ 

Alk 
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friust be 
the offici 

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'eft to th< 

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issues). Tl 
Natchito 



PAGES 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 13, 1988 



F 


EDITORIAL 



























r 



Growth is the mark of a winner 

NSU on the way up 



' BRAD BODENHEIMER 
tff Writer 

It seems that the world just isn't 
;enough nowadays for the amount 
people in it. Jails are overcrowded, 
;hways are overcrowded, North- 
estern is overcrowded. Maybe there 
8 just too many people trying to do 
o much of the same thing. 

But unlike roads and prisons, 
liversities can benefit from having 
o many people. Just think of all the 
utra revenue that new students pro- 
die. Then think of the many ways 
at it could be put to good use. 

Take, for instance, the plans that 
lesident Alost announced for the 
impus last week. Soon to be added 
ithe already beautiful Northwestern 
impus are a clock tower, a pond, and 
itdoor gazebos. All will provide 
ditional character to the university 
id could prove to be effective means 
attracting even more students. 

Additional funds will enable the 
tainistration to install a more effec- 
ye computer system to aid in the 
igistration process. Badly needed 



parking lots can be built. Conse- 
quently, the overall standard of stu- 
dent life can be dramatically improved 
by the increase in revenue, especially 
since Governor Roemer cut the budg- 
ets of state universities. 

Money, however, is not the 
bottom line here, as it is in so many 
other cases. An increase in enroll- 
ment, in particular one as substantial 
as that experienced here at NSU, sends 
a message to the entire world that this 
is an institution on the move. Think 
about it. 

Northwestern had the largest 
increase in enrollment of any univer- 
sity in Louisiana, which means we 
must be doing something right We 
have the second largest band in the 
state. If NSU were a corporation, 
investors would be buying our stock 
like crazy. These are all signs that 
Northwestern is beginning to make its 
mark in the world, and that would not 
be possible without all the new stu- 
dents. 

Of course, there will be prob- 
lems with such a surge. We know all 



too well the parking dilemma, the 
registration hassle, and the long lines 
in the cafeteria. There will undoubt- 
edly be others. But just as any busi- 
ness has to spend money to make 
money , Northwestern must endure this 
short-term strain in order to benefit in 
the long run. The only problem is that 
it's the students, not the university, 
that must put up with the burdens. 

But this is the time to look on the 
bright side of things. Northwestern 's 
better reputation will make a degree 
from here mean that much more. This 
means that graduates can compete for 
better jobs and gain employ ment more 
rapidly. That is something that can't 
be said about a Northeast or a 
McNeese. 

To sum it all up, everyone must 
realize that even though we may be 
having some difficulty right now, we 
will definitely reap the rewards in the 
years to come. Growth is a mark of a 
winner. What would we be if we were 
simply satisfied with the way things 
were? Northwestern is on the way up, 
and that is something we should all 
take pride in. 



See Diff clonk. See S*)S$ die » ye 

See ft'fPqo boom. Oca I 

Leave. oo )h c 




o 

* 




Like us ore\se^ 



fote and make the difference 

Jy SONYA RIGAUD 
Iditor 

Well.here I am finally! I guess a lot of you were wondering when I was ever going to come 
round and put my two cents in. To tell you the truth, I haven't felt the need to . . . until now. 

It's that time of year again . . . time for the Student Government Association (SGA) 
lections. 

Some of you say, "SOOO?" 

SOOO, it's up to you, all of you, to get out there and vote Wednesday for the people you 
eel will serve the students of this university better. Sure, you may not really know who the 
GHT people are. There are no platforms to go by, as there are with the presidential race. We 
|ill know where Dukakis and Bush stand on certain issues, but we do not know, for the most part, 
hat the views of the SGA nominees are. 

However, use your instincts and listen to those who know the people running for office, 
lso, read the statements submitted, those that were submitted. These statements were written 
vith much thought to qualifications posessed for the positions sought. They may give 
aformation vital to your decision-making. 

You may think that this election may not be very important to you. Well, think again. There 
s a very important word in SGA . . . that is student. 

Who are you? You are a student of Northwestern State University. And what is the purpose 
)f SGA? It's purpose is to serve the students of Northwestern State University. 

This election may seem a minor detail compared to the ongoing presidential campaign. But 
i this election you will make a choice that will directly affect you as a part of this university. 

Get out there and vote Wednesday. Vote and make the difference. You owe it to yourself 
nd to this university as a whole. 



Support 
your NSU 
representatives 
in the 
Miss Natchitoches 
Pageant 
on Saturday, 
September 17, 

in the 
Student Union 
Ballroom at 7 p.m. 
The girls representing 
Northwestern are 
Holley Methvin, 
Melissa Harper, 
and Melissa Frank. 
This pageant is a 
preliminary to the 
Miss Louisiana 
Pageant, 
which leads to 
Miss America. 
NSU students get in 
for only $1 with 
student ID. 



Organizations! 

Don't forget to 
renew your charter! 
For more information, 
see page 8. 



Write a letter to the editor! 



Current Sauce 



The Current Sauces published weekly during the 
f afl and spring semesters by the students of Northwest- 
ern State University of Louisiana. It is not associated 
with any of the University's departments and Is fi- 
nanced independently. 

The Current Sauce is based in the Office of 
Student Publications located in Kyser Hall. The office 
of the editorial staff is 225H,telephone (3 1 8) 357-5456. 
The adviser's office is 103 Kyser Hal telephone 357- 
5213. 

The mailing address for the Current Sauce is P.O. 
Box 5306, NSU, Natchitoches, LA 71497. 

All correspondence, including letters to the edi- 
tor is welcome. Material submitted for consideration 
must be mailed to the above address or brought to 
the office. 

The deadline for all advertisement and copy is 3 
P.m. each Friday. Inclusion of any and all material is 
'oft to the discretion of the editor, 

Letters to the editor should be typed (double- 
spaced), signed and should Include a telephone 
number where the writer can be reached. No anony- 
mous letters will be printed. 

Current Sauce subscription rates are $1 1 per 
academic year (28 issues) or $6 per semester (14 
'$$ues). The paper is entered as second-class mall at 
Natchitoches, LA. The USPS number is 140-660. 





SONYA RIGAUD 






Editor 






MICHELLE WEEGO 






Managing Editor 




MINDYBECK BRAD BODENHEIMER 5 


SHANNON BOUFFANIE 


BETH BOWMAN EDDIE BRIGGS DeANNA COCHRAN 


KAREN ENGERON ANDY HARRISON 


H. SCOTT JOLLEY 


LAURIE LeBLANC ELIZABETH McDAVID CHRIS McGEE 


BRIAN McPHEARSON ANN MILLER 


CAROLINE WARD 




Staff Writers 




DAMI AN DOMINGUE TIM JOHNSON 


GLEN MOORMAN 




Photographers 




AT ,., V . EVAN TAYLOR 

ALLE Cartoonist EDD LEE 
EVANS Circulation/ 
Advertising DAMIAN DOMINGUE Distribution 




OLIVIA MAROMA 






Assistants to the editor 






TOM WHITEHEAD 






Adviser 





Fall '88 



Current Quotes 



At this point in the presi- 
dential race, which candU 
date would you choose: 
Dukakis or Bush? 





Thomas Burge 
Education 

Freshman, Shreveport 

"I want Bush, but I don't 
know why. I don't particularly 
like either candidate." 



Bobby Cockrell 
History 

Sophomore, Natchitoches 

"Bush, because he's the 
lesser of the two evils." 





Anna Rivers 
Elementary Education 
Sophomore, Z wolle 

"At this point, I would 
vote for Dukakis because his 
views are focused on the com- 
mon individual and his needs." 



Sharon Green 
Business Administration 
Freshman, Colfax 

"Dukakis, because we 
believe in many of the same 
issues. He's the man to get the 
job done!" 




Sean Mayfield 
Journalism 
Sophomore, Leesville 

"George Bush; overall 
his conservative policies per- 
taining to the welfare system 
and national defense are in the 
direction I feel our nation 
should be heading." 



Mary Kay Dickson 
Electrical Engineering 
Freshman, Monterey 

"/ wouldn't vote for ei- 
ther one of them, because nei- 
ther of them have good enough 
qualities to be president. I'd 
vote for ALF or Pee-Wee Her- 
man before them!" 



SEPTEMBER 13, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 6 



SPORTS 



BPOF 



Northwestern Demons lose to UNR Wolfpack 



,ad 



By CHRIS McGEE 
Sports Writer 

As the old saying goes, "what 
goes around comes around." For the 
NSU Demons, a weekend excursion 
to Reno, Nevada, wasn ' t a long enough 
journey to escape the murky shadow 
of that old prophecy. 

The previous week saw the 
Demons dominate Southwest Mis- 
souri State for 2 1/2 quarters en route 
to a 24-8 triumph. But for last 
Saturday's game, the University of 
Nevada-Reno Wolfpack forced the 
Demons to gulp down a huge dose of 
their own bitter medicine which had 
been so sweet a week earlier. 

After UNR and NSU battled to a 
7-7 standstill at the end of the first 
quarter, the Wolfpack got a strangle- 
hold on the Demons, outscoring them 
28-0 over the next 2 1/2 quarters to 
take a decisive 35-7 lead. A late and 
furious Demon rally fell short as UNR 
claimed the war, 35-26. 



Afterwards, Demon Head Coach 
Sam Goodwin commented, "It's hard 
to comment on individual perform- 
ances without having looked at the 
film, but right now, I'd say we got 
whipped up front on both sides of the 
line." 

A glance at some of the game's final 
stats would certainly uphold that phi- 
losophy. 

For the game, UNR's offensive 
juggernaut, led by QB Jim Zaccheo, 
rocked and rambled for 428 yards of 
total offense. Meanwhile, the Demon 
ground attack was humbled for only 
99 yards rushing on44 attempts, which 
averages out to a painfully low 2.3 
yards per carry. 

The Demons took the opening 
kickoff, but a resilient UNR defense 
put the clamps on NSU, forcing a 
punt 

Then, the Wolfpack offense kicked 
into high-gear, barreling 70 yards 
downfield to the Demon 8 when Zac- 



cheo threw to fullback Charvez Foger 
in the end zone for the score. Luca 
Adriani added the PAT to make it 7-0. 
Wolfpack. 

Two series later, the Demons re- 
turned the message. UNR's Ken Caleb 
fumbled a Mark Contreras punt, and 
NSU's Milton Constransitch recov- 
ered the ball at the UNR 38. The 
Demons proceeded to march to the 
one yard line, where Rusty Slack took 
it in for the score. Keith Hodnett's 
PAT tied the score at 7-7. 

From that moment on, it would 
have been advisable for the Demons 
to invest in a good telescope, for the 
Wolfpack blasted off, not to come 
back into sight until late in the fourth 
quarter. 

Over the next 2 1/2 quarters, UNR 
put on a display of tremendous offen- 
sive superiority .capping drivesof 80, 
88, and 55 yards with paydirt flour- 
ishes. Wide receiver Tony Logan 
accounted for 2 of those 3 UNR touch- 



Time Out With Vic 

Demon Fans, 

I think we owe our Demon team a GREAT BIG CONGRATULA- 
TIONS!!! Louisiana Tech got their butt kicked this 
weekend...60-0 ! Northeast didn't even score...23-0 . But our 
Demons held their ground in Reno, trailing only by nine 
points. .. 35-26 ! 

Considering the fact that our team was so far away from 
Demonland and that there were no cheerleaders, no band 
members, or any "Vic the Demons" to boost their spirit, I 
think that they did one heck of a fantastic job. 

They deserve our support! We're still off to a fantastic 
start and I don't want any of you Demon fans to forget that. 
Just remember, your spirit is what keeps Demonland alive. 

So, don't let your enthusiasm die! Keep your spirit 
alive! ! ! ! 



I'll be watching you, 




Vic TheTS^rrtcw 



Vic the Demon 



ALVl.N DIIBL1EUX,R.PH. 



BOBBY WAGGONER, R.PH, 




UNIVERSITY PHARMACY 
AND GIFTS 



926 College Avenue, Natchitoches LA 71457 
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Hours: 8a.m. to 6p.m. After Hours: 

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Every Monday Night 
7p.m. to Game End 
50 1 Draft 50 * Hot Dogs 
7 to 9 
Drink Specials 
THE LANDING 
302 Hwy 1 South 
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downs with receptions of 11 and 18 
yards, respectively. 

By the arrival of the fourth quarter, 
UNR had captured a one-sided 28-7 
advantage in a game which had been 
anticipated as an even showdown. For 
the Demons, the outcome thus far had 
turned into a nightmare that would 
have made Freddy Krueger proud. 

The nightmare continued. The 
Demons, in the shadow of their own 
end zone, coughed up the ball and 
Nevada-Reno claimed possession at 
the NSU four yard line. After losing 
3 yards, Zaccheo fired a 7 yard pass to 
tight end Demetrius Davis for the 
touchdown. Adriani booted the extra 
point with 14:06 left in the game to 
make it 35-7, Wolfpack. 

The Demons awoke from their 
shell-shock, but as it turned out, it was 
too late. The final nail had been put in 
the coffin. In the final 8:28, Scott 
Stoker took command for NSU, lead- 
ing the Demons to three touchdowns. 



Stoker took the ball in from a yard out But in *e end, UNR offensive 1 ^ 
and then threw to tight end Orlan might was the deciding factor. The 
Lockhart, who managed to get behind Wolfpack showed tremendous fire. T BRUCE ( 
the UNR secondary for a 76 yard TD power and balance in rolling up 42^'f ntributor 
pass. One Hodnett PAT brought the yards of total offense. UNR also tal- Forth ef 
score to 35-20 in favor of UNR. lied 26 total first-downs for the gamcf 5011, North 
The Demon fury reached its zenith an eye-popping total. jB team start- 

when Adrian Howard picked off an Offensively, the Demons made^" 1 "' takir 
errant Zaccheo pass, setting the stage things respectable with a late surge.P utheastern 
for a final NSU scoring march. The The Demons gained 371 total yards,?" 10 " 8 m en ] 
Demons assembled a 74 yard drive, 272 by the air-waves. Picking up 2oT ita 5 ional - w 

first downs, the Demons were able to^ in me 101 
cut down on penalties versus UNR ^ After th< 
they were flagged only 5 times. Rickey 
Overall, Wolfpack muscle layecV 006111 over 1 
to waste Demon quickness in a ratherf lS ' ve attacl( 
surprising fashion. "Reno is a goodl out ms ^ e ^ e ' 
football team. We were supposed to 

be the quicker of the two teams out 

there, but they surprised me. They 



culminating in a Mike O'Neal 1 yard 
dive into the end zone. The two-point 
conversion failed, and Nevada-Reno 
held on for the 35-26 victory in their 
first regular season game. 

Despite the catastrophic 2 1/2 
quarters in which the Demons were 
lambasted 28-0, there were positive 
points for NSU to look upon. Quarter- 
back Scott Stokerpassed for 272 yards, 
the tenth-best singular game perform- 
ance for a Demon QB ever. Also, 
Orlan Lockhart ran his consecutive 
»ames with acatch streak to 16 games. 



outphysicalled us," stated Goodwin. 

The Demons enjoy an open data 7 
this week as they prepare for a Sep. 71 id] 
tember 24 showdown with EastTexau 
State in Turpin Stadium. 




NSU STUDENTS 

15% DISCOUNT 

75 * BURGERS 
Every Tuesday 

Discount can only be used 

on food purchases 
that are not already on sale. 



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Located in Holiday Inn 
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Inn <£lace To "Be!! 



(f BRUCE ( 
wtributor 

After fir 
(venthinlast 
ad cross i 
ihnson has h: 
g two, if not 
"We're 
cording to Jc 
ly and as a t 
is year has b 
Those in< 
Demon < 
iglishandMj 
jrard Semier 
tin, and Ric 
ai Dan Ahre 
mien, Spiki 



hr€ 



join 

IfTOMWA 
mtributor 

Three a: 
bedNorthw 
an Bell on hi: 
onday. 

The three 
tnnedy, and 

Epps.afc 
Walker Ju 
Marshall Univ 
live of Moi 
alker, he wa 
as on the sqi 
82-1983,10! 
bn San Jacin 
«t year's jua 

When Be 
'lowing yea 
to. Immediai 
® after the 1 
i-6and21-13 
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phern Conl 

and repei 
1984-1985,* 

tourname 
Prances in 

Kennedy 
^ew Orleans 
Caching ex 
"ege level. 
•Mheastern j 
*duate assist 
yoming as tl 
champu 
10 the first roi 
^witha^-i 



3 



During tl 



campaign, 
Jduate assisu 
,lle Universit; 
, ly ateers wenl 
*amainthes 
toffs. 

I Edwards, 
'^mongrad 

Mon( 
Footl 

Every R 
7p.m. 1 
I* Draft 

Drin 
THE 
302 H 
31 



PAGE 7 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 13, 1988 




,ady Demons take Southeastern; 
eason starter with a 3-1 victory 



-"tensive 
tor. The 

ous flre . j BRUCE GROEN 
gup 428 t ntrU>utor 

'<■ also tal- For ^ ^ irst t * me s " lce * e 1 
he game f* 50 "' Northwestern State's volley- 
' ||1 team started the season in the win 
>ns made* |umn ' a 3-1 victory over 

ite surge P" 1 " 63516111 Louisiana. The Lady 

tal yards P" 10 " 8 l ' ien P^C'P 31 ^ th e LSU 
ing U p 2Q(Otational, winning one and losing 

re able tof^ * n * e tournament ' 

s UNR ass Afte r weekend slate, head 

nes. Rickey McCalister expressed 

>cle layedr iceni over ^ ^ ac ^ v Demons' of- 
inarathe#s' ve attack, but was optimistic 

is a good| out ^ ^ e f ense - 
pposed to 
teams our*; 
ne. They 
joodwin. 
open data 
for a Sep4 
BastTexasj 



"We played great defense in 
beating Southeastern (15-13, 15-9,4- 
15, 15-9) and UNO (15-7, 2-15, 10- 
15, 15-5, 15-12), but it (defense) was 
lacking against Northeast and USL," 
he commented. NSU played "better 
at the net" versus the latter two, 
McCalister added. 

Colette Jones-Horton has 
emerged as the team 's top hitter, being 
switched from a setterposition. Jones- 
Horton has 3 1 kills in 87 attempts for 
a .264 attack percentage. Tammy 
Mros is next in line with a .123 aver- 
age, making that duo the only Lady 



Demons with a hitting percentage over 
.100. 

Through the first five games, 
NSU is averaging 44.4 digs a game, 
while connecting on only 29.8 kills. 

"Right now, our defense is the 
only thing keeping us in the games. 
We will have to start putting our de- 
fense, hitting and blocking all together 
in a game. Until then we won't do 
well," said McCalister. 

The Lady Demons are off until 
next weekend, when Louisiana Tech 
makes a trip to Natchitoches for a 7:00 
p.m. start on September 17. 



Demons cross country 
plans improvements 



BRUCE GROEN 
wtributor 

After finishing a disappointing 
venth in last year's conference meet, 
ad cross country coach Leon 
ihnson has his sights set on improv- 
gtwo, if not three, places. 

"We're better than last year," 
cording to Johnson, "both indi vidu- 
y and as a team. The enthusiasm 
is year has been great." 

Those individuals making up the 
88 Demon edition are seniors Joe 
iglish and Mark Spikes; sophomores 
srard Semien, Mark Troxler, Duane 
tin, and Ricky Carroll; and fresh- 
en Dan Ahrens and Paul Naymen. 
imien, Spikes and English were 



NSU's second, third and fourth place 
finishers in three of four meets last 
season, while English finished first 
among all Demons in the Northeast 
Louisiana Invitational. 

"Of my seven years here, this 
cross country team is by far the best," 
Johnson added. "Last year, I think the 
guys got burned out on running, but 
this year, the pace is somewhat slower, 
and they're liking it better. If things 
continue as they have so far in train- 
ing, we will definitely move up in the 
standings." 

Only one runner is missing from 

1987. Ronald Wilkens, who led all 
Demons to the finish line in every 
meet but one, graduated last spring. 



Letters to the 
Current Sauce 
are welcome, 
provided they 
are signed. 



fhree assistant coaches 
oin Demon basketball 



TOM WANCHO 
Contributor 

Three assistant coaches have 
lined Northwestern State head coach 
an Bell on his staff, Bell announced 
pnday. 

The three are Robert Epps, B illy 
tnnedy, and Keith Edwards. 

Epps, a former player under Bell 
Walker Junior College and at 
larshall University, is a 25-year-old 
ttive of Mounbille, Alabama. At 
alker, he was a two year starter and 
is on the squad that went 29-4 in 

-1983, losing to national cham- 
m San Jacinto in the semi-finals of 
W year's juco tournament. 

When Bell left for Marshall the 
lowing year, he took Epps with 
to. Immediate dividends were real- 
*d after the Thundering Herd went 
i-6 and 2 1 - 1 3 with Epps in the start- 
?lineup. Marshall won its first ever 
tothern Conference title in 1983- 
'84 and repeated that performance 
1984- 1 985, adding apair of confer- 
,( * tournament crowns and NCAA 
Frances in the process. 

Kennedy is a24-year-old native 
^ew Orleans who has avastamount 
Caching experience at the major 
lege level. Last year the 1986 
"theastern graduate served as a 
^uate assistant at the University of 
toming as the Cowboys won the 
championship and advanced 

the first round of the NCAA play- 
^ with a 26-6 record. 
, During the 1986-1987 basket- 
' campaign, Kennedy served as a 
^uate assistant under Benny Dees 
P 6 University of New Orleans. The 
fleers went 26-4 before losing to 
^&Wl in the second round of NCAA 
loffs. 

Edwards, who will be serving as 
'Vernon graduate assistant this year, 



was a three year letter winner at David 
Lipscomb College in Nashville, Ten- 
nessee before entering the high school 
coaching ranks in 1984. 

The 27-year-old native of Cen- 
terville, Tennessee, has had coaching 
stops at Goodpasture High School in 
Nashville, Greater Atlanta Christian 
High School in Atlanta, Georgia, and 
at Middle Tennessee Christian School 
in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. 

Bell was named head coach at 
Northwestern State on August 12 af- 
ter a one year stint at East Carolina as 
an assistant coach. Previous to that, 
the former Demon guard spent four 
years on the staff at Marshall as Rick 
Huckaby's top assistant in charge of 
recruiting. 



A CUT ABOVE 



Professional Hair Care 



Lady Demons 

compete in 
cross country 

By BRUCE GROEN 
Contributor 

v Although the Lady Demons 
finished in the cellar in their half of the 
conference meet, it was not as disap- 
pointing as it may seem. 

"Sure, we finished last in the 
conference," said second year coach 
Mark Moles worth. "But each of the 
girls ran their best time of the year at 
the conference meet, and also con- 
sider the fact that not one of the girls 
is on scholarship for cross country." 

Sophomore Vicki Robarge re- 
turns as the team leader, finishing first 
among NSU's contingent in each of 
1987's six meets, followed by Kate 
Christmas, also a sophomore. Junior 
Mary Madison, sophomore Denise 
Miller, and freshmen Kim Harris and 
Carrie Cook are the other team mem- 
bers. 

As with the men, the women are 
"better individually and as a team," 
according to Johnson. 

The first meet for the Demon 
and Lady Demons will be Thursday, 
September 15 at the Demon Invita- 
tional in Natchitoches. Teams par- 
ticipating will be Louisiana Tech, 
Centenary and NSU. 



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Monday Night 
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7p.m. to Game End 
tot Draft 50 1 Hot Dogs 
7 to 9 
Drink Specials 
THE LANDING 
302 Hwy 1 South 
352-1579 



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SEPTEMBER 13, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 8 




Insurance 

BATON ROUGE — Commis- 
sioner of Insurance Doug Green an- 
nounced on Sept. 6 that Metropolitan 
Life Insurance Company, through its 
subsidiary Century 21 Insurance Serv- 
ices, will locate two offices in Louisi- 
ana. These offices will employ thirty 
people with an annual payroll in ex- 
cess of one million dollars. The of- 
fices will be located in Baton Rouge 
and Shreveport 

"We are excited that Metropoli- 
tan Life, through Century 21 Insur- 
ance Services, is coming to Louisi- 
ana", said Green. "While thirty jobs 
may not sound like a lot, it's thirty 
jobs we did not have a week ago", he 
said. And, said Green, "these type 
jobs don't destroy the environment." 

Metropolitan Life acquired 
Century 21 Real Estate Corporation 
in 1985. The creation of Century 21 
Insurance Services broadens 
Metropolitan's operations in the Real 
Estate, Mortgage Banking and Insur- 
ance fields. 

Wesley Foundation 

The Wesley Foundation is the 
Methodist Student Center located at 
520 College Ave. across from Alumni 
Center. Persons of any denomination 
are invited to visit. The director is 
Rev. Ryan Horton and the assistant 
director/counselor is Mickie 
Townsend. 

The Foundation is off to a run- 
ning start this year and has already 
planned a busy fall semester. Weekly 
activities include Monday night 
movies at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday lunch- 
eons from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 
and Wednesday night recreation at 
the First United Methodist Church on 
Second St with rollerskating, volley- 
ball, basketball, etc. There are also 
informal, non-denominational chapel 
services at 5 p.m. on Sundays fol- 
lowed by dinner. 

All of the above activities are 
free except for the Tuesday lunch- 
eons. These luncheons only cost 50 
cents per meal. The members of the 
Wesley Foundation would like to 
encourage everyone to join in any or 
all of the activities offered. 

At the fall planning session the 
newly elected officers were as fol- 
lows: Frank Rosamond, president; 
Mike Townsend, vice president; 
RobertGunn, secretary/treasurer; Beth 
Hastings, publicity chairman; and 
Russell Parkin, programming chair- 
man. Monitors for weeknights are 
Karissa Estes, Earnest Vinson and 
Russell Parkin. 

Everyone is welcome to go by 
and visit. The Wesley Foundation 
hours are 8 a.m.-9 p.m. on Monday- 
Thursday; 8 a.m.-5 p.m. on Friday; 
closed on Saturday and 4 p.m.-9 p.m. 
on Sunday. 

Ray Charles 

"A Man And His Soul"— Ray 
Charles, along with the 17-member 
Ray Charles Orchestra and the Rae- 
lettes, will be presented in concert 
Wednesday, Sept 28, at 8:15 p.m. in 
Prather Coliseum at Northwestern. 
This concert presentation is being 
sponsored by Northwestern 's new 
Cultural Events Series in cooperation 
with the Natchitoches-Northwestern 
Symphony Society. Ray Charles' 
songs of note include America the 
Beautiful, Georgia On My Mind, Hit 
The Road Jack, I Can't Stop Loving 
You, Seven Spanish Angels, Born To 
Lose, Busted, What'd I Say, Ruby, 
Take These Chains From My Heart, 
Cryin' Time, and Yesterday. General 
admission tickets are $5 for bleacher 
sections, and $10 for floor seating. 
Reserved eight-seat tables, priced at 
$100 each, are available to members 
of the Natchitoches-Northwestern 
Symphony Society. To order tickets 
by mail, write Ray Charles Concert, 
Departmentof Music and Theatre Arts, 
Northwestern State University, 
Natchitoches, LA 71497. Please en- 
close a check payable to NSU and a 
stamped, self-addressed envelope. For 
additional information, call (3 1 8) 357- 
4522. 



Monday Night 
Football Party 

Every Monday Night 
7p.m. to Game End 
50 f Draft 50 * Hot Dogs 
7 to 9 
Drink Specials 
THE LANDING 
302 Hwy 1 South 
352-1579 



Kappa Alpha 

Kappa Alpha Order would like 
to congratulate their Fall 88 Pledge 
class; Scott Bergeron, Chad Berry, 
Ken Boudreau, Chris Carter, Eben 
Cook, Erskine Cook, John Davis, 
Damon Daigle, Scott Dugas, Tim 
Dugas, Chris Funk, David Green, Jeff 
Henry, Jay Ingram, James Johnson, 
Tim Johnson, Alex Karst, Terry 
Kilgore.Von Klotzbach, Todd Mar- 
tin, Ivan MacDonald, Chad McGloth- 
lin, Michael McQueen, Trey Pace, 
Duane Patin, Brad Peace, Robert 
Washam, John Williams, Steve Wolfe. 
Pledge class president Steve Wolfe, 
vice president Chris Carter, and sec- 
retary/treasurer Jay Ingram. 

Kappa Alpha will be holding 
their annual Slave Auction on Sep- 
tember 22 at 8 p.m . at the Mansion on 
the Hill. Cash, checks, and all major 
credit cards will be honored. 



FCS 

The Fellowship of Christian 
Students will be meeting every 
Wednesday from 7 p.m. til 8:30 p.m. 
in Rm. 320 of the Student Union. 
Everyone is welcome and encouraged 
to attend. 



Chartered Organizations 

All chartered organizations on 
campus must fill out a request for 
semester renewal of recognition. Fail- 
ure to file a card indicates the organi- 
zation is no longer active on campus 
and will be omitted from the univer- 
sity publications and denied use of 
facilities. Deadline for submitting the 
renewal card is Oct 1. Please return 
all cards to Rm. 214 in the Student 
Union. 

All organizations are required 
to maintain a Northwestern Post Of- 
fice Box in the organization's name. 
The only exception is to have the mail 
received at department, e.g. Asso. of 
the U.S . Army-Military Science Dept. 

All events must be placed on the 
University Master Calendar. 



Potpourri 

The Potpourri staff meetings 
will beevery Tuesday at 6 p.m. in Rm . 
225 KyserHall. 

Panhellenic 

Panhellenic meetings will be 
every Thursday at 6 p.m. in the SAB 
conference room in the Student Un- 
ion. 



Scholars' College 

The Student Life Enrichment 
Committee of the Louisiana Schol- 
ars' College is sponsoring a series of 
"talk-shows" to be held monthly 
beginning September 19. The first 
topic will be mandatory drug-testing 
in the workplace. For more informa- 
tion contact a member of the Student 
Life Committee or call the Scholars' 
College at 357-4579. 



Writing Proficiency Test 

The writing proficiency test for 
juniors will be given at 1 1 a.m. Thurs- 
day, Sept. 15, in Kyser Hall, accord- 
ing to Sara Burroughs, chairman of 
the Language Arts Department. 

All first-semester juniors should 
come at that time to Kyser 303,309 or 
333, and bring a pen, blue book, and 
dictionary. An essay topic will be 
assigned. 

Taking the writing proficiency 
test is a requirement for graduation for 

students who entered Northwestern in 
September, 1985, and after. 

Dr. Burroughs said that results 
will be posted outside the language 
Arts Department, Kyser 318a couple 
of weeks after the test. 



SAB 

Anyone interested in working 
on the Public Relations and Advertis- 
ing Committee of the Student Activi- 
ties Board should go by the SAB of- 
fice in the Student Union Rm. 214 
Thursday at 11 a.m. 

The position for Concert chair- 
man is open . Anyone interested should 
go by the SAB office. 



Sigma Kappa 

Sigma Kappa will host a car wash 
Saturday, Sept. 24 at Mr. Gatti's from 
1 1 am.-2 p.m. Tickets will be sold 
until the car wash at $2 per ticket. 

Purple Jackets 

The next Purple Jackets meet- 
ing will be Thursday, Sept. 15 at 5 
p.m. Important business will be dis- 
cussed. 

Phi Mu 

Phi Mu is raffling a Samurai 
Jeep. Any interested persons should 
contact aPhi Mu active or provisional 
member. An amount of $5 will allow 
a person two chances at winning the 
jeep. 



Current Sauce 

The Current Sauce staff mee, s 
ings will be every Tuesday at 5 p. m 
Rm.225 KyserHall. 



Young Democrats 

Join the party ... the De mo | 
cratic party. Young Democrat meetj 
ings will be held on Thursdays at l| 
a.m. in Rm. 320 in the Student Union l 



Sigma Tau Gamma 

The brothers of Sigma Tai 
Gamma would like to congratulai 
new members of their Rose Counj 
They are Gwen Aucoin, Christini 
Billen, Julie Duggan, Christine Heiri NATCHE 
DebbieNaron,MargaretPerot,Marthker enrollme 
Perot, Niki Smith, Michelle Weegje Universitj 
Cynthia Wilson, and Honorary Roscent over las 
Kelley Robertson. 



Blue Key 

The Northwestern chapter 
Blue Key will have its monthly form 
meeting this Thursday, Sept. 15, 
1 1:30 in the Student Union Rm. 32 
All members please attend. 



figures reflei 
students ; 
smain cam 
Overall en 
:ern this fall i 
students o 1 
itration figui 
t of full-time 
nt, and regis 
fces campus in 



<•<•! don't want 
a lot of hype. 
I just want 
something I 
can count on.55 




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Northweste 
t students thi 
56 in 1987, an 
n campus ii 
isedby 506 sti 
71. 



)lym 
or cc 



LAURIE Le 
ff Writer 



Olympia Dul 
isidential c 
kakis, while 
ling of theme 
ike to approxi 
[Friday in Kj 
Michael Mi 
ling Dcmocra 
ion, prefaced] 
explanation 
ihael Dukaki 
I McHaleh 
Tgy policies, 
ninance over 
the present f 
Olympia Di 
ibly with a fi 
presence. T 
ito talk to pec 
ies. What Mi< 
about he bel 
it what he say 
of distortions 
Sons. Beacc 
'ack Brittain, 
urdinator for 
ign, spoke of 
position such 
*akis' patric 
iPosition to of 
them "bold 
addressed." 

Olympia I 
'eed that the i 



a ff meei 
t5 Pm.i 



e Demo 
rat meet 
ays at 1 
nt Union 



SEPTEMBER 13, 1988 NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 

OF LOUISIANA 



VOL. 77, NO. 7 



Northwestern enrollment figures up by 5.9% 



;ma Tai 
igratulat 
se Cour 
Christin 

ine Heirs! NATCHITOCHES — Fall se- 
tt, Marth iter enrollment at Northwestern 
eWeegtie University increased by 5.9 
rary Ros cent over last year, and registra- 
i figures reflect large gains in full- 
5 students and enrollment on 
U s main campus in Natchitoches. 

Overall enrollment at North- 
itern this fall is 6,455, an increase 
hapter cf64 students over the 1 987 fall term 
ily formaistrati 011 figure of 6,091. Enroll- 
pt 15, it of full-time students is up 17.6 
Rm. 32}»nt, and registration on the Natchi- 
es campus increased by 13.8 per- 



Northwestern has 4,194 full- 
s students this year compared to 
66 in 1987, and enrollment on the 
in campus in Natchitoches in- 
ised by 506 students from 3,665 to 
71. 



Undergraduate enrollment, 
which included increases in freshman, 
sophomore, junior and senior classes, 
is up this year by 9.6 percent from 
5,221 to 5,757. Full-time undergradu- 
ate enrollment climbed 18.6 percent 
from 3,4 10 to 4,046. 

In addition to the large increase 
in students on the Natchitoches cam- 
pus, enrollment is also up sharply this 
year on Northwestern 's Shreveport 
campus, which recorded a 23.4 in- 
crease from 836 to 1,032. 

This year's enrollment gains, 
combined with a 1 5 .5 percent increase 
in 1987 — the largest enrollment in- 
crease in the university's history — 
give Northwestern 1,183 more stu- 
dents than in the fall of 1986. 

Dormitory occupancy reflects 



the enrollment increase over the past 
two years. Northwestern has 1,925 
students in university housing this year 
compared to 1,520 last fall. The 
number of students in campus hous- 
ing facilities is up by 743 since 1986, 
when dormitory occupancy was 1,182. 

In addition to the 4,17 1 students 
at Natchitoches and 1,032 in Shre- 
veport, Northwestern has 686 students 
at the Fort Polk-Leesville campus and 
499 students at England Air Force 
Base. 

Freshman enrollment, after a 
record-breaking increase of 27.4 per- 
cent last year, is up by another 4.2 
percent this fall from 2,981 to 3,107, 
the largest number of freshmen in the ' 
school's history. 

Because of the dramatic increase 



in the number of freshmen enrolling 
last fall, Northwestern has a 43 per- 
cent increase in this year's sophomore 
class from 797 to 1,140. The junior 
class is up 9.4 percent from 595 to 
65 1 , and senior enrollment increased 
2.1 percent from 806 to 823. 

Northwestern also has 698 
graduate students this fall, including 
675 in master's degree programs, 16 
in specialist degree programs and 7 
doctoral students. 

Dr. Robert Alost, Northwestern 
president, said this year's enrollment 
increase "continues the healthy and 
dynamic growth that the university 
has experienced over the past two 
years." 

He said the increase in full-time 

students "is especially meaningful, 



because it reflects a rapidly growing 
nucleus of traditional, on-campus 
students that is needed to assure the 
vitality and stability of the univer- 
sity." 

Alost attributed the continuing 
enrollment growth at Northwestern to 
"a dramatic improvement in the 
university's image that is the result of 
higher academic standards, expanded 
and improved student life activities 
and the positive, upbeat attitude of 
students, faculty, staff, and alumni." 

He added, "Increases in all 
undergraduate classes for a second 
consecutive year show that North- 
western is not only attracting but is 
also retaining more students. This 
improved retention is a tribute to the 
commitment of faculty and staff mem- 



bers to our students and their respon- 
siveness to the students' needs." 

The Northwestern president 
pointed out that both "the quantity and 
the quality of the university's student 
body is improving." He said average 
ACT scores among incoming fresh- 
men has increased from 15.4 to 17.9 
over the past two years. 

Alost also emphasized the im- 
portance of the large increase in the 
university's student credit hour pro- 
duction, which is determined by the 
number of courses in which students 
are enrolled. "The SCH production is 
up 12.6 percent from 69,023 last year 
to 77,741 this fall, and that is ex- 
tremely significant since the funding 
formula for higher education is based 
upon student credit hour production." 



Mympia Dukakis stumps 
or cousin Mike at NSU 



LAURIE LeBLANC 
ff Writer 



Olympia Dukakis, first cousin of 
isidential candidate Michael 
kakis, while on location for the 
sing of the movieS/ee/ Magnolias, 
ike to approximately 175 students 
[Friday in Kyser Auditorium. 
Michael McHale, president of 
ung Democrats, the hosting organi- 
ion, prefaced Dukakis' arrival with 
explanation of why he believes 
chael Dukakis is the right candi- 
McHale highlighted Dukakis' 
Tgy policies, the decline in export 
ninance over the past eight years, 
Ithe present federal deficit. 
Olympia Dukakis began the as- 
ibly with a frank explanation for 
presence. "I'm here to encourage 
no talk to people; to talk about the 
les. What Michael Dukakis is talk- 
about he believes in , so you can 
stwhathesays. There have been a 
of distortions. Deal with the dis- 
tions. Be accurate and truthful." 
lack Brittain, Natchitoches Parish 
Ordinator for the Dukakis cam- 
: gn, spoke of statements from the 
position such as the questioning of 
'kakis' patriotic attitudes and his 
Position to offshore drilling, call- 
8 them "bold face lies that need to 
addressed." 

Olympia Dukakis vehementiy 
*ed that the issues need to be ad- 



dressed. In reference to the miscon- 
strued information Dukakis quoted 
Abraham Lincoln, saying, "You can 
fool some of the people some of the 
time, all of the people some of the 
time, but you can't fool all of the 
people all of the time,"adding,"please 
God let that be true." 

The conversation then turned to 
Republican vice-presidential candi- 
date Don Quayle. "Quayle was a bad 
choice," Dukakis said. "People real- 
ize something is happening. They 
realize their feelings are being ma- 
nipulated, their perceptions are being 
tampered with. They get it," she said. 

When questioned about taxes, 
Dukakis admitted she was not able to 
adequately reply. 

Answering an inquiry about off- 
shore drilling, Dukakis said," The 
individual states will be involved in 
any decisions." 

Dukakis expressed her grateful- 
ness for the "extraordinary hospital- 
ity," she received from the Natchito- 
ches townspeople. 

Commissioned by the University 
of New Jersey, Dukakis along with 
Robert Harling is working on a per- 
formance piece involving the lives of 
Clementine Hunter, Marie Theresaand 
Kate Chopin that will be used at the 
presidential inauguration. 

Dukakis returned home to New 
Jersey this past Saturday after wrap- 
ping up Steel Magnolias, to raise 
money for the Dukakis campaign. 




A full-time job 

New recruiters chosen for Northwestern 



By MICHELLE WEEGO 
Managing Editor 

As new changes and new stu- 
dents cover the campus, the Admis- 
sions Office of Northwestern State 
University does not believe the good 
work should stop. Recently selected 
to join the Northwestern recruiting 
staff are Marjoree Mike, Marlene 
Edwards and Jimmie McCormick. 

"Drawing students to North 
western is a full time job," said Geor- 
gia Beasley, Director of Admissions. 
"I believe we have selected the best 
team possible." 

Majoree Mike, a native of 
Marthaville, recently graduated from 
Northwestern with a degree in busi- 
ness and a masters in student person- 
nel. After working with the motion 
picture Steel Magnolias filmed in 
Natchitoches throughout the summer, 
Mike feels she is ready to work with 
locals as well as other people. "I've 
met a lot of people this summer through 
the movie and I feel we can draw 
Natchitoches kids into Northwestern 
instead of them deciding to go some- 
where else like LSU," Mike said. 

Marlene Edwards, originally 
from Dubberly, graduated from Lou- 
isiana College this past May. Besides 
earning her degree in management 



information systems, Edwards cap- 
tured the third runner-up position in 
last year's Miss Louisiana College 
pageant. 

"Since I graduated from another 
school I have an outside view," Ed- 
wards said. "From whatl've seen I'm 
very impressed with Northwestern. I 
wish I had come here instead. Every- 
thing you need is right here at your 
fingertips." 

Edwards is looking forward to 
working with high school students. "I 
always wanted to be the person to 
encourage students to go on to college 
and further their education. Hopefully 
they ' 11 choose to go on and it will be at 
Northwestern." 

Jimmie McCormick, a Shre- 
veport native, graduated from North- 
western in May with a degree in pub- 
lic relations and a minoi in English. 

McCormick feels his experience 
needed for the job came from the 
many activities he was involved in on 
campus. He looks on his new job as a 
recruiter not only as a big boost in his 
career but also as an adventure. 

"I feel that this is going to give 
me exposure for what I want to do 
with my future but I also think it's 
really neat talking to high school stu- 
dents," McCormick said. "We are in 
essence bringing the university to 



them. They seem to be all fired up 
about us coming to their schools." 

McCormick does believe that 
the recruiting team has their work cut 
out for them though. "NSU has the 
largest freshman class yet. We have a 
lot to work for, a long way to reach but 
we ' ve also never had a recruiting team 
as strong as this," he said. "With the 
position we're in now, we are among 
the top schools in the state. There's no 
doubt in my mind that we'll break the 
record." 

"Dr. Alost and Georgia Beasley 
have put a strong team together," 
McCormick said. 

Marjoree Mike added, "I've 
been at NSU for six years, through 
good and bad. I believe that now it is 
stronger than ever. All of us on the 
staff seem to be working very well 
together. We'll make a good team." 

"One thing that helps," Beasley 
said, "is that we have a competitive 
nature between other Louisiana col- 
leges as well as our own recruiters. 
That makes us try harder individually 
and as a team." 

"The recruiters have to be com- 
mitted to their jobs because it's not 
just part time work," Beasley said. 
"While NSU students are home dur- 
ing Thanksgiving, we are up at the 
campus giving tours to interested 



students. We can't just have the high 
schoolers come in and have a stranger 
guide them around. They are expect- 
ing to see the recruiter they came to 
know during school visits." 

For the past two weeks the re- 
cruiting team has been on the road 
visiting several different schools. "The 
new recruiters will be watching the 
others give presentations during col- 
lege days, and when they are ready, 
they'll try it on their own," Beasley 
said. 

The recruiters have already 
planned their schedule for the year. 
From September until Thanksgiving 
the team will be visiting high schools 
throughout the state. By December, 
every school should have had at least 
three courtesy visits. Target schools 
will also have been chosen and a 
greater concentrated effort will be 
placed on these. 

During March and April, stu- 
dent tours will be conducted on cam- 
pus. There will also be senior and 
college weekends. In May, the re- 
cruiters will attend every graduation 
that will allow them. June hosts the 
state-wide cheerleader camp. July 
offers recruiters a short vacation until 
August when they come back to wcl- 
comenew Northwestern Students and 
start planning all over again. 



Bookstore announces contest winners 



By SHANNON J. GREER 
Staff Writer 

Rolando Nerio won the grand 
prize in a drawing held by the Univer- 
sity Bookstore on August 3 1 at 3 p.m. 
Nerio, a second semester freshman 
from El Salvador, received a Panasonic 
stereo. 

The raffle was held as part of 
the newly remodeled bookstore's 
Grand Opening celebration, accord- 
ing to bookstore manager Darlene 
Rachal. 

Mr. Fred Fulton, Director of 
Student Life, drew the winning tick- 
ets. 

First prize winner Gilbert 
Robinson of Campti received a ten- 
speed bicycle. 

Otherprize winners are: Todd 



Dupree, Jordache luggage; Eddie 
Mason, Sony radio; Malcolm' Grant, 
Applause stuffed bear; Charles E. 
Sabin, Northwestern tennis shorts; 
Carlos Treadway, Northwestern cap; 
Buddy Hays, Northwestern muscle 
shirt; Jo Anne Pina, Northwestern back 
pack; Orlando Ware, Northwestern 
sweatshirt; Hartwell Rice, Northwest- 
ern sweatshirt; Janice Tappin, tannig 
sessions from the Warehouse; Brad 
Grace, tanning sessions; Denise 
Mitchell, tanning sessions; all from 
Natchitoches and Anquinette Moore, 
Northwestern sweatshirt, from Many. 

Ms. Rachal and the Univer- 
sity Bookstore staff would like to 
congratulate the winners and thank all 
participants. 




Dr. Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., noted historian and writer, will speak on 
Thursday, September 22, at 11 a.m. in the A. A Fredericks Fine Arts 
A uditorium as part of the Northwestern Distinguished Lecture Series. 
The topic of Schlesinger' s speech is u The Cycles of History. yy 



SEPTEMBER 20, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 2 



NEWS 



________ 



Students to receive free tickets to Charles concert 



By DeANNA COCHRAN 
Staff Writer 

Ray Charles, the legendary 
"genius of soul," will be presented in 
concertonWednesday,September28, 
at 8:15 p.m. at Prather Coliseum at 
Northwestern State University. 

All students wishing to attend 
the concert should go by the music 
department in the Fine Arts Building 
from now until the day of the event to 
pick up tickets free with student I.D. 's. 
This action is to assure the student ad- 
mittance into the concert in case of a 
sell out. The students who obtain tick- 
ets ahead of time will be asked to 
show their I.D.'s with the tickets, 
which will be marked as student tick- 
ets. Students may try to obtain tickets 
at the door, if room allows. 

Charles, who will be joined by 
the seventeen-piece Ray Charles 
Orchestra and his "little darlings," the 
Raelettes, will be the opening attrac- 
tion of Northwestern's new Cultural 
Events Series. The concert is being 
co-sponsored by the Natchitoches- 
Northwestern Symphony Society. 



This September is a special 
month for Ray Charles. Not only does 
Charles celebrate his fifty-eighth birth- 
day this September, the month also 
marks his forty-third year as a profes- 
sional musician. Charles, who now 
records exclusively for CB S Records, 
began his recording career for the 
small Los Angles-based Swingtime 
label with "Confession Blues" in 1948. 
Ray Charles then went on to his first 
major hit "I've Got A Woman" in 
1955. Over the next two years, he 
claimed 1 more Top 1 R&B record- 
ings. 

Ray Charles proved himself to 
be a very versatile performer. After 
conquering the musical fields of both 
rhythm and blues, and jazz, he went 
on the excel in pop and country. In 
1976, Charles took on George 
Gershwin *s Broadway musical "Porgy 
and Bess." This led Ray to such "easy 
listening" standards as Rodgers and 
Hammerstein's "Some Enchanted 
Evening" and "Oh What A Beautiful 
Morning." Ray Charles' talents even 
spilled over into ballet. Charles per- 



formed with the New York Ballet in 
"A Fool For You" at Lincoln Center. 
This ballet, choreographed by Peter 
Martins to a selection of Charles' most 
popular tunes, granted Charles the dis- 
tinction of being one of the few popu- 
lar artists who have had a ballet cre- 
ated especially for their work. 

Ray Charles' career is marked 
by several other recognitions as well. 
In 1979, Charles' version of 'Georgia 
On My Mind' was approved as the 
official song of the state of Georgia. 
Brother Ray, as Charles is of ten called, 
has received 10 Grammy Awards and 
numerous gold records. During the 
1 970' s Charles received many awards 
including the Golden Plate Award and 
the National Association for Sickle 
Cell Disease's first "Man of 
Distinction" Award. On December 
1 6, 1 98 1 , Ray Charles received a S tar 
on Hollywood Boulevard's "Walk of 
Fame." In January 1986, Ray was 
inducted into The Rock & Roll Hall of 
Fame. His next honor was bestowed 
in December of the same year when he 
named as one of the recipients of the 



Kennedy Center Honors. Then in 
January 1988, Ray Charles received 
the National Academy of Recording 
Arts and Sciences' Lifetime Achieve- 
ment Award. 

General admission tickets to the 
concert are $5 for the bleacher section 
and $10 for floor seating. These tick- 
ets may be ordered by sending a 
stamped, self-addressed envelope, 
along with a check payable to NSU, to 
Ray Charles Concert, Department of 
Music and Theatre Arts, Northwest- 
ern State University, Natchitoches, 
LA 71497. 

There will also be eight-seat 
tables, priced at $100 each, available 
exclusively for benefactor, patron and 
sponsor members of theNatchitoches- 
Northwestern Symphony Society. 
These tables may be reserved by 
members by calling NSU's Depart- 
ment of Music and Theatre Arts at 
(318) 357-4522. Individuals inter- 
ested in becoming members of the 
Natchitoches-Northwestern Sym- 
phony Society should contact Mrs. 
Margaret Adkins at (318) 352-3867. 




Louisiana School expects banner year 



By DeANNA COCHRAN 
Staff Writer 

The Louisiana School, located 
on the Northwestern Campus, is a 
school for outstanding high school 
students. An experimental institution 
for the betterment of education, it is 
funded for four hundred students. 
These students are some of the bright- 
est in our state. 

The Louisiana School has three 
focuses: Humanities, Math/Science, 
and the Arts. The school requires all 
of the basic courses that are required 
throughout the state, but also provides 
classes that allow the students to pur- 
sue subjects of particular interest. 
Twenty-six units are required for 
graduation. 

After graduation, the Louisiana 
School student is well prepared for 



college. Dr. Richard Brown, director 
of the Louisiana School, says that 60 
percent of the Louisiana School gradu- 
ates choose to attend college in Lou- 
isiana, while 40 percent choose to go 
out of state. Those that go to college 
out of state attend some of the most 
prestigious universities in the coun- 
try . Some even enroll in the Ivy League 
schools, such as Harvard, Yale, or 
Princeton. Dr. Brown says that he 
expects to see more of the Louisiana 
School students stay at Northwestern 
as the Scholars' College evolves. 

There have been some changes 
in a few classes at the Louisiana School 
this year. The course Concepts of 
Wellness has been altered to include a 
focus on exercise and nutrition. The 
American History class, normally a 



one-year course, has been reformed 
into a semester course. 

Another change at the Louisi- 
ana School deals with the school's 
alcohol policy. Formerly if a student 
were caught with alcohol, the student 
would be sent home for five days. 
Now, if a student is caught with alco- 
hol, he is sent home the weekend 
following the infraction and is re- 
quired to see a counselor. 

Luke Williamson, president of 
the senior class, gave details about 
other aspectsof the Louisiana School. 
One program of particular interest is 
the Student Forum, sponsored by Dr. 
Brown. The Student Forum gives the 
students an opportunity toexpress their 
opinions, develop new ideas, and 
streamline existing policies. William- 



son is enthusiastic about the program 
because it allows personal contact 
between the administration and the 
student body. 



The students were excited over 
Buddy Roemer's visit to their school. 
Governor Roemer commended the 
school on its excellent academic 
achievements. This is not surprising, 
since the Louisiana School is the first 
in the state in education. One-eighth 
of the current senior class were cho- 
sen as National Merit semi-finalists. 
Williamson says that the key to the 
school's success is in the housing 
environment. The dorm-like atmos- 
phere encourages students to develop 
independent ideas. 



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Police offer advice to students plagued with parking problems 



By CAROLINE WARD 
Staff Writer 

With the large number of ve- 
hicles located on campus, it is impor- 
tant to have as efficient a parking 
system as possible. Although the 
system does not always meet with the 
approval of the students here at North- 
western, the university police have 
devised the simplest, most efficient 
set of standards for all involved. 

The first necessary step before a 



student may park on campus is the 
obtaining of an official parking sticker. 
This sticker may be obtained from the 
university police and, "must be dis- 
played in an uprightpositioneither on 
the outside of the lower left portion of 
the rear window of the vehicle or on 
the left side of the rear bumper of 
vehicle so as to be visible from a 
standing position behind the vehicle," 
according to Rickie A. Williams.Chief 
of University Police. No other form 
of display is acceptable. 



After affixing the sticker, stu- 
dents still must pay close attention to 
parking regulations. There are many 
different zones on campus, which carry 
with them specific stipulations. For 
example, the zone in front of Roy Hall 
has been designated as a thirty minute 
zone for visitors, students, or faculty/ 
staff members who have business in 
Roy Hall. There are also certain zones 
specifically for commuters. Students 
who violate these rules will receive 
tickets from the university police. 



Also, on a trial basis, parking zone 
assignments will be changed from the 
usual times of 7am-5pm to the new 
times of 7am-3pm Monday through 
Friday. 

The university police request 
student cooperation in order to keep 
the system operating smoothly. They 
also ask students to keep in mind that 
the possession of a parking permit 
does not guarantee a convenient park- 
ing space. 



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Natchitoches, LA 



GREEK AND ORGANIZATION 
PICTURES FOR THE POTPOURRI 
WILL BE TAKEN ON 
OCTOBER 4, 5, 6. 

If your organization is not listed on ihc schedule or your 
organization will not be able to meet at that time, please contact 
Jennifer Walsh in the Pofpouri office at 357-5456. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4 


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5 




THURSDAY, OCT( 


4:00 


Alpha Lambda Delta 


4:00 


Phi Alpha Theta 


4:00 


Alpha Kappa Alpha 


4:05 


Anthropology Club 


4:05 


Phi Beta Lambda 


4:05 


Delta Sigma Theta 


4:10 


Beta Gamma Psi 


4:10 


Phi Eta Sigma 


4:10 


Zeta Phi Beta 


4:15 


BSU 


4:15 


Phi Kappa Phi 


4:15 


Pan-Hellenic 


4:20 


College Republicans 


4:20 


Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia 


4:25 


Alpha Phi Alpha 


4:25 


Council of Ye Revels 


4:25 


PRSSA 


4:30 


Kappa Alpha Psi 


4:30 


IEEE 


4:30 


Psi Chi 


4:35 


Omega Psi Phi 


4:35 


International Students 


4:35 


NSU ROTC Demon Batallion 


4:40 


Phi Beta Sigma 


4:40 


Iota Lambda Sigma 


4:40 


Psychology Club 


4:45 


IPC 


4:45 


Kappa Omicron Phi 


4:45 


SAM 


4:50 


Panhellenic 


4:50 


LHEA 


4:50 


Sigma Delta Chi 


4:55 


Phi Mu 


4:55 


Le Cercle Francais 


4:55 


Young Democrats 


5:05 


Sigma Kappa 


5:00 


NACUS 


5:00 


Wesley Foudation 


5:15 


Sigma Sigma Sigma 


5:05 


NAIT 






5:25 


Kappa Alpha 


5:10 


Periaktoi 






5:35 


Kappa Sigma 










5:45 


Sigma Tau Gamma 










5:55 


Tau Kappa Epsilon 










6:05 


Theta Chi 



ALL PICTURES WELL BE TAKEN IN FRONT OF 
THE WATSON LIBRARY. 
PLEASE BE ON TIME. 
THE SCHEDULE WILL BE FOLLOWED AND 

RESCHEDULING "WILL BE DONE AT 
THE CONVENIENCE OF THE POTPOURRI. 
MAKE SURE ALL MEMBERS OF YOUR 
ORGANIZATION ARE AWARE OF DATE, TIME AND 
PLACE OF THE PICTURE. 



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i 



PAGE 3 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 20, 1988 




Five girls selected to 
homecoming Court 




Karen Guidry 



Students elect two 
freshman senators 




Senator at Large elected 




Ronnie Wise 



Homecoming Court runoffs 

All students 



vote for four 




Sherry Farley 







Melody Smith 




Kim Wilson" 



SGA Senator- At-Large runoffs 

All students 
vote for one 





/ feel that with my exten- 
sive background in organiza- 
tion, planning, and public re- 
lations I can help you, the stu- 
dents, obtain what you want 
most from college in general, 
and Northwestern in particu- 
lar. At the same time, this will 
helpNSU to grow and develop 
into the type of institution it is 
striving to be. I ask you to 
support me in this election and 
guarantee that I will do my best 
to fulfill the duties and obliga- 
tions of this position. 



Organizations! ""' 
Don't forget to 
renew your charter! 
For more information, 
see page 8. 

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SEPTEMBER 20, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 4 




Elections continue despite minor complications 



By MINDY BECK 
Staff Writer 

The Student Government Associa- 
tion (SGA) and the Homecoming 
Court elections continue despite vari- 
ous complications. The nomination 
ballots for the Homecoming Court 
contained a few errors. There was no 
space allotted for the Homecoming 
Court nominations, only allowing 
room for names of Mr. and Ms. NSU 
nominees. Mr. and Ms. NSU was not 
scheduled to be nominated with this 
ballot and will be nominated in two 



weeks. The nomination forms will go 
out this week. 

Also, the nomination forms were 
sent out and many organizations re- 
ceived them too late. The problems 
resulted from the Labor Day holiday, 
with the Post Office closed and nomi- 
nation ballots not getting out in time. 
"We're trying our best," said Com- 
missioner of Elections Michael Ma- 
son. 

According to Mason, the nomi- 
nations for Mr. and Ms. NSU and 
State Fair Court open this Wednes- 
day, Sept. 21. Applications for SGA 



positions still open may also be turned 
in. Positions open are sophomore, 
junior, senior and graduate senators. 
The deadline for all nominations and 
applications is Wednesday, Sept. 28. 
Pictures will be taken Thursday, Sept 
28. No time has been set. 

State Fair Court, Mr. and Ms. 
NSU, and SGA elections will be held 
Monday, Oct. 3 at Warrington Cam- 
pus in Shreveport and Wednesday, 
Oct 5 at the Natchitoches campus. 

The SGA election results were 
as follows: Freshman Class Senators, 
Lisa Giddens and Staci Jo Klotzbach; 



Senator-at-Large, Ronnie Wise, and 
the run-off will be between Robert 
Bennett and Shanda Florane. 

The Homecoming Court elec- 
tions resulted in: Mary Miller, queen; 
Elizabeth Bonnette, Cindy Bethel, 
Karen Guidry, and Karen Engeron. 
The run-off will be out of Sherry 
Farley, Melissa Frank, Kirsten 
Gernhauser, Shwu-Fen Lee, Sonya 
Rigaud, Cindy Ross, Melody Smith 
and Kim Wilson. The run-off elec- 
tions will be held Wednesday, Sept. 
21 in the Student Union Lobby from 7 
a.m. until 7 p.m. 



NSU video tape helps housing projects prevent drugs 



By BRIAN McPHEARSON 

Staff Writer 

"Is there a drug pusher operat- 
ing out of your apartment complex?" 
That was the question addressed by a 
tape recently produced by Northwest- 
ern through the Louisiana Housing 
Authority. The fifteen-minute pres- 
entation was designed to help free- 
housing projects recognize the signs 
of illegal, drug-related activities being 
run out of their complexes. 

Along with the Northwestern 



Journalism department, headed by 
Tommy Whitehead, and the Natchito- 
ches Sheriffs office, the presentation 
was made using staged demonstra- 
tions in order to produce a realistic 
guide. 

Scenes included in the tape were 
depictions of pushers actually proc- 
essing the drugs, selling the drugs to 
people on the streets, and payoffs of 
Housing Authority officials. 

Also shown were scenes of 
pushers offering "free samples" in 
order to hook buyers and there was 



even a staged crack bust. Other facets 
of the drug trade shown in the tape 
were prostitution and racketeering. 

Mike Hayes of the Natchitoches 
Housing Authority commissioned the 
tape from NSU and Sheriff Norm 
Fletcher exhibited the presentation to 
other divisions around the state. 

Involved in the actual making of 
the tape was Ms. Connie LeDoux, a 
broadcast journalism teacher here at 
Northwestern. She said that the equip- 
ment used in making the presentation 



are by no means out of reach to the 
individual departments here at NSU. 
"If any specific department needs our 
facilities, they are more than welcome 
to use them," added LeDoux. 

NSU students David Antilley, 
John Simoneaux, and Bill Schneider 
were instrumental in obtaining the 
music for the production, said Le- 
Doux. Most of the music came from 
the soundtrack of the movie Colors. 
'This has been a good opportunity foi 
the students working on the tape,' 
aid LeDoux. 



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LSC attempts to make core curriculum more appealing 



By KAREN ENGERON 
Staff Writer 

* J Louisiana Scholars' College, 
now in its second year, is trying to 
attract students by making their core 
curriculum more appealing. 

The core curriculum is com- 
posed of 69 credit hours. Twenty hours 
of texts and traditions concern itself 
with western civilization. Twenty 
hours of paradigms of nature com- 
bines mathematics, biology, chemis- 



try, and physics. Foreign language re- 
quires 12 hours. A junior- and senior 
seminarin the liberal arts and sciences 
is credited with 8 hours. Democratic 
vistas and critical reading/writing are 
each 4 hours. And there is a one hour 
computer applications class. 

In the first year of the Liberal 
Arts college, there were 9 full-time 
professors and 4 adjunct professors. 
Now, in the second year, there are 1 1 
full-time professors and 5 adjunctpro- 
fessors. 



In the fall of 1987 there were 
roughly 150 students. Sixty-eight re- 
signed from the program. Now there 
are approximatly 200 freshmen and 
82 sophomores. 



Carl "Jocko" Kelley, a sopho- 
more from Natchitoches, said/There 
are problems right now in the pro- 
gram. Students just need to adjust toa 
changing program. Things have 
changed and the students have to learn 



to simulate. The changes are for the 
better. The majority of the students 
will come around and I don't forsee 
any problem." 

Dr. Colsen, associate profes- 
sor, said.'LSC is designed to provide 
an unusual kind of learning environ- 
ment for a student who wants an in- 
tense exposure to the traditional disci- 
pline (the arts and sciences). This re- 
quires a full commitment to the living 
and learning environment." 



Peer counseling seminar for handicapped open to public 



By EDDIE BRIGGS 
Staff Writer 

The New Horizon Independent 
Living Center of Shreveport will be 
conducting a free peer counseling 
seminar at Natchitoches Vocational 
School (Votech) from 9:30 a.m. to 4 
p.m. , Tuesday, Wednesday and Thurs- 
day, September 27-29. 

Designed to improve the quality 
of life for disabled persons, the semi- 
nar will deal with such issues as stress 



management, self-advocacy and dis- 
ability awareness, and will be con- 
ducted by staff psychologist, Dr. J. B. 
Childs. 

New Horizon, one of only 15 
such programs in the United States, is 
the first group in Louisiana to conduct 
handicapped seminars in rural par- 
ishes. Parishes hosting the free 
seminars include Webster, Claiborne, 
Lincoln, Bienville, Red River, Desoto, 
Sabine and Natchitoches. 



The seminar is funded through a 
developmental disabilities grant to 
New Horizon Rural Outreach Pro- 
gram, so participants will only be 
responsible for their lunch, and a 
comfortable place will be available 
for "brown bagging," if desired. 

All disabled persons between the 
ages of 18-55 are invited, regardless 
of how minor or extreme the disabil- 
ity, including emotional and substance 



Varnado reconstruction 
reflection of NSU past 



By CAROLINE WARD 
Staff Writer 

Having been founded in 1884, 
Northwestern State University is a 
university that takes pride in its tradi- 
tion. This fact is reflected in the 
campus landscape itself. Much of the 
old architecture remains, right down 
to the three columns that Northwest- 
ern uses as its insignia. The recent 
refurbishing of Varnado Dormitory 
illustrates the desire of Northwestern 
to preserve its past. 

Varnado Dormitory was first 
constructed in 1939. The furniture 
that the contractors had to work with 
was the original furniture from the 
1939 period. Harold Boutte, Director 
of Housing, said, "What we did with 
Varnado was, we took the existing 
furniture and kind of gave it a facelift. 
We had to contract a company to take 
all the furniture, refinish it, and bring 
itback. Wefinishedthestudentrooms. 
We added new features to them [such 
as carpeting, extra closet space, new 
paint, and new blinds] but we tried to 
keep the same atmosphere." In coop- 
eration with the idea to preserve as 
much of Varnado's past as possible, 
the bathroom was refinished in a 
manner that saved as much of the 
original marble as possible. "We are 
tradition. We are a hundred years 
old," comments Boutte. 

The ballroom in Varnado is still 



under contract. The main priority of 
the project was to get enough work 
done on the building to move the 
students in on time, and in as comfort- 
able a manner as possible. Plans for 
the ballroom include redoing the fur- 
niture and creating an elegant atmos- 
phere to host those events that do not 
really need the larger Union Ball- 
room. 

The university was able to save 
in the area of furniture because they 
did not need to purchase any new 
items. They were able to refinish the 
existing pieces, which were of such 
quality that it would be unthinkable to 
replace. An approximate summation 
of costs was obtained from the office 
of Mr. Loren Lindsey: the architects 
were contracted for $64,020; furni- 
ture refinishing was contracted for 
$201,044; the construction was con- 
tracted for $1,193,201.53. 

According to Harold Boutte, 
"We wanted to do something for the 
upperclassmen." The students appear 
to appreciate the efforts. "They're 
like home. They are really comfort- 
able," says Leigh-Ann Tabor. One 
aspect of Varnado that could be viewed 
as either good or bad was commented 
on by Laura Ainsworth, "The renova- 
tions are beautiful, but it is kind of like 
living in a museum. Everything is so 
new and so quiet. They really like it 
quiet over here." 



abuse. Also invited are those who 
work with handicapped persons, and 
those interested in helping in any way. 
Such persons may include nursing 
and physical therapy majors. 

You may register by calling 
Votech at 357-3 162, Monday-Friday 
or by contacting Ruth Mahaffy or 
Mary Dunn at New Horizon I. L. C, 
4030 Wallace Avenue, Shreveport, 
LA 71 108, 635-3652. 



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PAGE 5 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 20, 1988 



— — 



EDITORIAL 



— — — ■ 



llilii 



Clean up dorm problems 



L BRAD BODENHEIMER 
Writer 

No one ever said dorm life was 
effect. I mean, you have to expect 
b 2 a.m. convocations outside your 
tor, stereos blaring at 7 a.m. and the 
ts-than- spacious spaces where 
(u'll live for at least the next four 
lonths. 

But just like any other room 
ou' d pay for, you expect certain basic 
(iienities. Now, I can't speak for any 
f the other dorms, but Rapides fails 
j provide some of those basics for 
fliich its residents pay — and a lot of 
esidents are damn mad! 

Most everyone expects the 
community" area of the dorm to be 
jpt up, just as residents are expected 
5 maintain their own rooms. Bath- 
oom, halls, the parking lot and the 
jounds surrounding the dorm are the 
{Sponsibility of Northwestern to keep 
Jean. This is not being done. Not 
ply is it demeaning and unsighdy to 
tsidents, but it is also dangerous to 
beir health. 

Take, for instance, the com- 
(laints of Tony, an R. A. in the south 
ring. Twice he has put in requests to 
iave mold and mildew removed from 
lie walls in the bathroom, both to no 
tvail. The fungus has been there since 
lie semester began. At least the dorm 
auld ' ve been cleaned before students 
irrived for a new year. Last year, two 
ssidents on the very same floor that 
fony is on developed foot infections, 
me requiring surgery. Doctors said 
hat the infections were caused by the 
jiowers. Just when you thought it 
ras safe to go back in the water! The 



smart students are forced to wear 
rubber thongs in the showers to avoid 
disease. 

While we're on the subject of 
showers, do you know how hard it is 
to get a hot shower at Rapides? It's 
almost impossible, especially in the 
morning when it's desired the most. 
It's a very aggravating feeling to have 
your hopes of a nice, warm shower 
when you wake up come to an all-too- 
abrupt end as that cold water hits you. 
And it's only going to get worse in the 
winter. Don't let anyone tell you it is 
because everyone is trying to shower 
at the same time because the water is 
the same in the afternoon and in the 
evening. But I guess the hot water that 
comes out of the cold faucets in the 
sinks makes up for it That is too hard 
to believe. How can there be no hot 
water to shower with, yet no cold 
water to brush your teeth with? 

Tony also requested this year 
that a dead raccoon and dead fish be 
removed from the grounds. Try to 
imagine the foul odor they gave off. 
Granted, they shouldn't have been left 
there in the first place, but if I stay at 
a hotel and one of the guests leaves a 
mess, I'm certainly not going to clean 
it up. 

It's obvious that residents are 
responsible for the dead animals, but 
unless those who are responsible are 
found and made to clean them up, the 
university staff must. 

Everyone realizes that it's hard 
to find someone to maintain the bath- 
rooms and grounds, but the funds are 
certainly there. Some of that money 
should be spent to hire more staff to 



keep the dorms up, for they are indeed 
one of the negative aspects of NSU. 
Also, the administration must listen to 
the R.A.s: They are the vital link 
between administration and residents. 
If students really do come first here, 
then their health should be a primary 
concern. 

However, like anything else, 
students must do their share. Try to 
keep your dorm clean. If you do not 
have enough respect for your home to 
keep it clean, at least you should re- 
spect the home of your friends. You 
should also report anything that is 
wrong or anything requiring mainte- 
nance. First of all, if no one reports it, 
no one is going to know about it. 
Secondly, if many people report it and 
continue to report it, maybe then the 
university will be forced to do some- 
thing about it. You should speak up 
and demand your rights. Demand the 
service you paid for. At $832 per 
room, per semester, you sure as hell 
paid for it! 

I' m sorry to say that students are 
again going to have to be the ones to 
take the initiative because I really 
don't believe Northwestern is going 
to worry itself with "little things". 
There' s too much cash floating around 
in front of the faces of the administra- 
tion. What many students want is for 
some of that cash to be spent on making 
their stay here more pleasant and 
comfortable, rather than taking away 
housing scholarships and building 
clock towers. Remember, it's one 
thing to attract students here with 
empty promises, but it' s a whole other 
ballgame keeping them here. 



BIFF GIVES MOM THE GOOD MEWS 




MtTlST It* 
*4 



Reader writes "knowledge most important" 



ar Editor, 

Regarding the article, NSU ON 
IHE WAY UP, in the September 13 
Isue of the Current Sauce: 

You have put forth the idea that 
he growth of expanding numbers of 
tudents at NSU, thus growth in reve- 
ue, thus growth in recognition is 
|oing to make NSU a winner. You are 
pcorrect. NSU is only going to be a 
miner if its growth in within the 
pits of what a university is — a place 
f higher learning. 

Now, I don't see any mention of 
cademics in your article and I don't 
ie much attention be paid it at NSU. 
t course, there is the Scholars Col- 
bge but it only consists of a handful of 
tadents and faculty whose minds will 
trophy if NSU as a whole does not 
lighten its creative atmosphere and 



offer a curriculum conducive to higher 
learning. 

NSU portrays itself as a good 
liberal arts college but in the last year 
there has been a cutback of courses 
offered in philosophy and geography; 
the history department survives only 
by the skin of its teeth. The effects of 
neglect are noticeable. The profes- 
sors at NSU, save a few, have lost 
their enthusiasm under a pile of pa- 
perwork, meetings and cheerleading 
for the university. Professors no longer 
have the time or energy to engage in 
intellectual discussions with students. 
It is sad, for when our professors 
become rote teachers, those growing 
numbers of revenue producing stu- 
dents become "educated," lead rote 
lives and die, never having known the 
spirit of creativity that sustains the 



essence of being human. What a 
waste! 

"So, Brad, when you see growing 
numbers of students and know that 
means an increase in revenue, do not, 
not even for a second, assume that 
inherent in the recognition received is 
a good reputation. NSU's reputation 
rests on correct priorities, the most 
fundamental being an environment 
that nurtures knowledge, and this Brad 
is a quality that not only should but 
must be insisted on. 

What need for apond, when you 
have a lake? 

What need for a clock, when 
you have a watch? 

What need for a good educa- 
tion? To know how to live well. 

Charlotte Hanks 




By SONYA RIGAUD 
Editor 

There are a lot of people in this 
town who were selectively chosen to 
participate in the filming of Steel 
Magnolias. They became overnight 
movie stars in the Hollywood of the 
South. 

These people were paid for their 
long hours on the set and they por- 
trayed major characters— well major 
enough. But there were some of us 
who perhaps didn'tpush too hard, or 
didn't quite look the part, or didn't 
know the right people to get these 
fabulous parts. 

Oh, well . . . that's O.K. because 
some friends and I finally decided we 
were going to get in that movie one 
way or another. So, when the chance 
came along, we grabbed it. Yes, we 
trucked ourselves to the ri verbank for 
the filming of the Christmas Lights 
Festival. 

We learned so much about the 
set and the filming. I noticed how 
they had to have every little detail 
just right. Sometimes it was a little 
annoying for the impatient and weary 
volunteers. We were chosen for one 
scene and it wasn't shot until an hour 
and a half later. But I guess that's 
what goes into a Academy Award 
winning movie. At least, I hope so. 

But guess what! I heard it 
through the grapevine that that scene 
was going to be cut from the movie. 
Oh, well, maybe we'll be seen in that 
other shot where Annelle loses her 
contact ... no, that one may be cut, 
too. Maybe the crowd scene in front 
of the bandstand? I doubt it! 

So was it all for nothing? No, I 
must admit we really did have a lot of 
fun playing BINGO in the Elks Lodge 
with the Rowdy Boys (Important 
characters in the movie who did get 
paid). Thanks.guys.forrelieving the 
boredom. 

Yes, yes, yes, ... we were the 
stupid ones. But however stupid it 
was to stand around for hours and 
hours from dusk til dawn doing abso- 
lutely nothing and not even getting 
paid for it, it was really one terrific 
experience! 



Current Sauce 



The Current Sauce's pubTtshed weekly during the 
faH andspring semesters by the students of Northwest- 
ern State University of Louisiana. It is not associated 
with any ot the University's departments and Is fi- 
nanced independently. 

The Current Sauce is based in the Office of 
Student Publications located in Kyser Hall. The office 
of the editorial staff is 225H,telephone (3 1 8) 357-5456. 
The adviser's office is 103 Kyser Hal. telephone 357- 
5213. 

The mailing address for the Current Sauce Is P.O. 
Box 5306, NSU, Natchitoches, LA 71497. 

All correspondence. Including letters to the edi- 
tor is welcome. Material submitted for consideration 
must be mailed to the above address or brought to 
the office. 

The deadline for all advertisement and copy is 3 
P.m. each Friday. Inclusion of any end all material is 
left to the discretion of the editor. 

Letters to the editor should be typed (double- 
spaced), signed and should Include a telephone 
number where the writer can be reached. No anony- 
mous letters will be printed. 

Current Sauce subscription rates are $11 per 
academic year (28 issues) or $6 per semester (14 
issues). The paper is entered as second-class mall at 
Natchitoches, LA. The USPS number is 1 40-660. 



SONYA RIGAUD 
Editor 

MICHELLE WEEGO 
Managing Editor 

MINDYBECK BRAD BODENHEIMER SHANNON BOUFEANIE 
BETH BOWMAN EDDIE BRIGGS DeANNA COCHRAN 
KAREN ENGERON ANDY HARRISON H. SCOTT JOLLEY 
LAURIE LeBLANC ELIZABETH McD AVID CHRIS McGEE 
BRIAN McPHEARSON ANN MILLER CAROLINE WARD 

Staff Writers 

DAMIAN DOMINGUE TIM JOHNSON GLEN MOORMAN 
Photographers 



ALLEN 
EVANS 
Advertising 



EVAN TAYLOR 
Cartoonist 

DAMIAN DOMINGUE 
OLIVIA MAROMA 
Assistants to the editor 



TOMWHITEHEAD 
Adviser 



EDD LEE 
Circulation! 
Distribution 



Fall '88 



Current Quotes 



How did it feel to be an 
extra in "Steel Magnolias? 





Trisha Mastainich 
Elementary Education 
Freshman, LaPIace 

"Everything they do 
has to be exactly perfect. 
They do each scene over 
and over again." 



Van Reed 
Journalism 
Freshman, Eunice 

"Although I was just 
an extra...Hollywood, here 
I come!" 





Candace Staats 
Undecided 

Freshman, St. Louis, MO 

"Being an extra in the 
movie was an exciting ex- 
perience. Although it was 
hard hours and hard to keep 
up with my school work, I 
would do it again." 



Stacey Leigh Taff 
Radiological Technology 
Freshman, Pineville 

"/ loved working as 
an extra. It took a lot of 
patience but I would love to 
do it again." 




Kenny Hemmer 
Public Relations 
Freshman, New Iberia 

"Working as an extra 
was a great experience. The 
best thing was that I learned 
what all goes into making a 
major motion picture. The 
cast and crew were, over- 
all, great people. My favor- 
ite actress was Olympia. 
She was very open and 
natural and she approached 
everything with a sense of 
humor. As far as the work 
goes, the only thing hard 
about it is that it takes a 
long time to do and it gets 
tiresome." 



Kelly Graham 
English 

Freshman, New Orleans 

"/ played the part of a 
photographer at the Christ- 
mas Festival and I loved it. 
Film-making is an amazing 
process. My experience had 
fully rekindled my desire to 
go to film school." 



SEPTEMBER 20, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 6 



SPORTS 



Demons prepare to battle 
ETS in weekend matchup 



By CHRIS McGEE 
Sports Writer 

After being derailed at Nevada- 
Reno, the Demon Express applied an 
off week to preparing for this Saturday 
night's battle with the East Texas State 
Lions. 

Two weeks ago, the Demons 
launched a late, furious assault on UNR, 
but that seemingly immortal element 
known as "time" showed up in Nevada- 
Reno silver and blue, nipping any and 
all NSU visions of a wondrous come- 
back. As you recall, the Demons fell 
just short, 35-26. 

This week, the Demons return to 
their secure, friendly backyard of Tur- 
pin Stadium to face East Texas State, a 
team that has gotten out of the gates in 
fine-tuned fashion, as shown by a 3-0 
record. 

Analyzing ETSU's potential, 
Demon Head Coach Sam Goodwin 
remarked, "I was very impressed with 
them. They've got the talent to compete 
with anyone in our league. Maybe not 
on a week in , week out basis , but for one 
game, like they've got with us." 

This Lion team is to be respected. 
Thanks in part to a more rigid defensive 
unit, ETSU has done a sudden about- 
face after crawling home to a horrific 2- 
9 mark last season. In their three victo- 
ries, the Lions have surrendered an 
average of just 14.7 points per game 
while scoring an average of 21 .5 points 
per game. That works out to a winning 
margin of 6.8 points each game. The 



underlying message: These guys rely 
on defense in order to win close games. 

The defensive-front four in 
ETSU's scheme of things include last 
year's leading tackier, Gary De Vaughn 
(6-3,235, Jr.) and the Lions' own Rock 
of Gibralter, Ronnie White (6-2, 280, 
So.). 

With 30 tackles and two quarter- 
back sacks, Mike Ciszewski heads the 
ETSU linebacker corps, while defen- 
sive backs Donald Parker and Jeff 
Manuel lead the secondary with 3 inter- 
ceptions apiece. Also, safety Kerry 
Shelton has recorded 23 tackles and 1 
pickoff of his own. 

Although the Lion of f ense doesn ' t 
strike any morbid fear in opponents, 
they have revealed the big play from 
time to time. In last week'sgame versus 
Southern Arkansas, ETSU tailback 
Jarrod Owens exploded for a 77 yard 
touchdown jaunt, and Johnny Hurndon 
returned a punt 66 yards to the end zone. 

While Owens leads ETSU with 
222 yards rushing, Mike Trigg has 
passed for 306 yards. Receivers Gary 
Compton and Jeffery Dotie have ac- 
counted for 2 1 catches worth 354 yards. 

The battle in the trenches will be 
worthy of much observation, especially 
when the Lions have possession of the 
ball. ETSU's offensive line holds a 
clear size advantage to the Demon de- 
fensive front, averaging 256 pounds per 
man to 241 for the Demons. As it was 
in Reno two weeks ago, the Demons' 
quickness will try to offset the Lion's 
men of granite. 



The return of two vital players for 
NSU will be watched with much inter- 
est. Randy Hilliard, a second-team all- 
Southland Conference choice last year 
returns from the suspended list, while 
speedy tailback Ken DeWitt suits up for 
the first time this year after suffering a 
broken arm on August 16. He may see 
action Saturday night. 

The Demons spent the week work- 
ing strictly on fundamentals as well as 
timing the passing game and stopping 
the run to force the pass, a strategy that 
will be employed by the Demons against 
ETSU. 

Commenting on ETSU's overall 
makeup, Goodwin stated, "They're 
pretty balanced but right now their 
running game is a little bit ahead of their 
passing game simply because they don' t 
have the great receivers that the old East 
Texas State teams had when I played 
against them. They're not as versatile 
as Reno, but more so than Southwest 
Missouri." 

Back in 1981, ETSU triumphed 
over the Demons 28-21 in Natchito- 
ches. The sour part of that Lion win was 
the fact that NSU busses had to provide 
transportation forETSUdue toalackof 
traveling funds on the Lions' part. 
If strategy finds its way and all goes 
well, the Demons will take ETSU trav- 
eling arrangements into their own hands 
and boot the Lions back to Commerce, 
Texas. 

Kickoff is set for 7:00 p.m. in Turpin 
Stadium. 



Time Out With Vic 



Demon Fans, 

I sure hope the Lions are 
leave Demonland dragging their ta 
them because, after a restful "op 
our Demon team is ready to defeat 
Texas State Lions in a big way!!! 

If you've made other plan 
Our second home game of the seaso 
an exciting one and I expect all 
Come out and support the 
ing begins at 3:30pm on the east 
Coliseum with kick-off scheduled 
the Demons as they LICK 




prepared to 
ils behind 
en" weekend, 

the East 

s . . .CANCEL THEM! 
n is sure to be 
of you to attend. 
Demons!! Tailgat- 
side of Prather 
for 7:00pm. Cheer 
THE LIONS ! ! ! ! ! 



11 see you there, 

\J\C:' \\H ft^CMon 



Vic the Demon 





3 OPS* . 





FOR HIGH FAYING JOBS 

IN LOUISIANA INDUSTRY AND BUSINESS 



Thai's what the Louisiana Investor- 
OWwd Electric Companies help 
Louisiana graduates to be— wanted 
for permanent, well-paid jobs in 
and business statewide, 
jobs you and the rest of 
Jass of '89 will be applying for 
'"may be the product of an industrial 




development initiative that began 
when you were to the first grade. 
Industrial development is a long-tenn 
undertaking. Ana Louisiana's electric 
utilities are very committed to it. 

Right now, we're working oa initia- 
tives that will benefit the Class of '09. 
Your kids. That is planning ahead! 




Investing in your energy future 




LOUISIANAS INVESTOR-OWNED 
ELECTRIC COMPANIES 



Central Louisiana Electric Company/Gull States Utilities Company 
Louisiana Power & Light Company/New Orleans Public Service Inc 
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Wi 



By 

Staj 



char 
All] 
Foo 
Non 
$10. 

SCOT 

ran£ 
you 
chai 
ticb 
tion 



Lady 

NAT( 

ISU' s Lady! 
aided its four 
wth a 3-0 (1 
iver the South 
fonday nigh 
"It was a 
nented head i 




Cofflpiv 



Hwy 1 By-Pass 




Natchitoches, LA 



GO 

DEMONS 



Chicken Finger Basket; 

And Medium Drink 

BUY 1 GET 1 FREE 



Must pay sales tax & 7% service charge. 
May not be used ta conjunction with any 
other offer. Limit 1 coupon per customer 
per visit. Expires September 26,1988 




Lac 
sea 



yTOM\W 
■ontributor 

Northw 
temonsdidn 
lowing of thi 
temon Invite 
^pus. 
Bouyed by : 
Snish from V 
Christmas, N 
Hie two mile i 
tehind Louisi 
Mark Mole 
►omen'scros 
toppy with hi 
In a way, I'm 



OPEN 24 HOURS 

357-8198 



PAGE 7 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 20, 1988 



SPORTS 



Win big with sports sweepstakes 



By CHRIS WILLIS 

Staff Writer 



Attention students! Here's a 
chance to win up to $5,000 in cash. 
All you have to do is purchase a 1988 
Football Sweepstakes ticket from the 
Northwestern Athletic Association for 
$ 1 0. Add up the total points your team 
scores in the column , and if your score 
ranges in one of the shown categories, 
you win! This is not gambling. It's a 
chance to win up to $5,000! No two 
tickets are alike. For more informa- 
tion call 357-5251. 



yy 1988-89 

' DEMON 
& LADY DEMON 
HOME BASKETBALL 
SCHEDULES 

SINGLE GAMES 
Dec. 6 Women w. Mita. 
Collete 

Feb. 77 Men w. NichoU* St. 

DOUBLEHEADERS 
Dec 16 Women vs. Southern 
Wm. 

Men vs. Southeastern 
Jan. 14 Northeast' 
Jan. 19 North Texas' 
Jan. 21 Tens-Arlington* 
Feb. 9 Southwest Texas* 
Feb. 11 Sam Houston" 
Feb. 16 Stephen F. Austin' 
Feb. 18 McNeese St.* 

'Southland Conftmce 

FOR SEASON TICKET 
INFORMATION CALL 
(31S)3S7-S2S1 



#03274 



NORTHWESTERN 
ATI 1LET1C ASSOCIATION 
Nonhnracnt Slate Unt\-rrsir\' 
Natchitoches. IA 

1983 FOOTBALL SWEEPSTAKES 

TOTAL PRIZES $5,000 
"90 BIG CHANCES TO WIN* 
DONATION S10 

NAME 



ADDRESS 



ZIP_ 

PHONE ( )_ 



11988 FOOTBALL SWEEPSTAKES 



PRIZES $5,000 



NORTHWESTERN ATHLETIC 
ASSOCIATION 

NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 
J500 GIVEN AWAY EACH WEEK FOR 10 WEEKS! 

YOUR 3 TEAMS EACH WEEK ARE: 



12 3 4 

G A I S 

B X S T 

# D E R 
#03274 



5 
E 
R 
C 



6 
Y 
E 
D 



7 8 9 10 

Z A Q F 

U U B T 

C R V X 



WEEKLY PUIS: 

Highest Ttvt« Ttam Tout 

Second Highest 

Third HighM 

Foonh HlghM , 

Fifth Highest 

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JJOO 

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t so 

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$ 30 

1 10 

1 10 

> 40 

» to 

TOTAL WEEKLY PRIZES »S00 



Lowest Three Teem Total . 
Second Lowest 





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MONTH 


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STUDENT DISCOUNT 
20% off purchase (except buffet) 
Delivery orders over $10-20% discount 
Not valid with any other offer 
Must present student ID 
FREE DELIVERY 

CUACTED DEL.VEKY AREAJ 



124 HWY. 1 SOUTH 
NATCHITOCHES, LA 71457 
352-5250 

If NSU beats E. Texas 
State Saturday 
beer is 5(K & 
pitchers are $2 

with food purchase. 
After the game only with 
student ID 



I 

LARGE FOR MEDIUM 

I Buy Any Large Pizza And Pay The Price 



I 
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Of A Medium Size Pizza With The 

Same Number Of Toppings 
Valid At Participating Pizza Inns. 
Not Valid With Any Other Offer. 

Pjj . Expires 9/30/88 

e Pizza inn. 



Two Medium Cheese Pizzas 
$8.87 

New York Style or Original Thin Crust 

Two medium 100% real cheese pizzas. 

Available for dlne-iri, carry out or delivery. Limited delivery areas. 
Not valid with any other offer or coupon. Only at participating 
restaurants. Tax not Included. Limit 1 coupon per customer per visit 



Pizza inn. 

tn wm rtu* wm . 



Expires 9/30/88 



Lady Demon volleyball scores fourth victory 



NATCHITOCHES— 

YSU's Lady Demon volleyball team 
idded its fourth victory of the season 
nth a 3-0 (15-11, 15-0, 15-8) win 
iver the Southeastern Lady Lions here 
fonday night. 

"It was a good team effort," com- 
nented head coach Rickey McCalis- 



ter after the match. "It took us a while 
to get into the game, but this is proba- 
bly the best we've played all year." 

Highlights of the evening were 
NSU's come from behind victory in 
game one, Tanya Champagne's nine 
straight points in game two, which 
gave NSU a 14-5 lead, and Tammy 



Mros' four consecutive service aces 
in the final gamefora 13-8 advantage. 

The Lady Demons are now 4-3, 
and play Nicholls State in Thibodaux 
tonight. Thursday, NSU plays host to 
Southern Mississippi, before playing 
in the Piccadilly and Travel Lodge 
Tournament in New Orleans. 




NSU STUDENTS 

15% DISCOUNT 

Every Day 

75* BURGERS 
Every Tuesday 

Discount can only be used 

on food purchases 
that are not already on sale. 



Lady Tracksters place 
second at invitational 



ly TOM WANCHO 
Contributor 

Northwestern State's Lady 
Itemons didn ' t disappoint in their first 
flowing of the year at last Thursday 's 
fcemon Invitational, held on the NSU 
ampus. 

Bouyed by a second and third place 
finish from Vicki Robarge and Kate 
Christmas, NSU finished second in 
Be two mile race, a mere two points 
lehind Louisiana Tech. 

Mark Molesworth, the head of the 
►omen's cross country program, was 
kppy with his squad's performance. 
in a way, I'm happy, but on the other 



hand we can ' t be satisfied with finish- 
ing second. We were two points away 
from taking home our first win in the 
history of our program. The girls have 
worked hard and it showed today. 
Next time, we've got something to 
shoot for and something to build on." 

Not as impressive was Northwest- 
ern State's male cross countriers, who 
finished well back in second place 
with 52 points. Louisiana Tech cap- 
tured places one through seven to win 
the four mile race with a team total of 
15 points. 

Both teams are in action Septem- 
ber 24 at the Louisiana Tech Invita- 
tional. 



rug > 



ATTENTION BSN 
CLASS OF 1988. 

The Air Force has a special pro- 
gram for 1988 BSNs. If selected, 
you can enter active duty soon 
after graduation— without waiting 
for the results of your State Boards. 
To qualify, you must have an overall 
2.75 GPA. After commissioning, 
you'll attend a five-month intern- 
ship at a major Air Force medical 
facility It's an excellent way to pre- 
pare for the wide range of experi- 
ences you'll have serving your 
country as an Air Force nurse of- 
ficer. For more information, call 

USAF NURSE RECRUITING 
1 -800-423-USAF TOLL FREE 



Don't Let Money Stand 
Between You And College! 



First Commerce Corporation banks, as the 
largest financiers of education in the state of 
Louisiana, are committed to helping young 
people get the quality education they need 
and deserve. 

A Student Loan from a First Commerce bank 
lets students concentrate on studying without 
worrying about tuition loan payments until 
after graduation. That's because our Student 
Loans have liberal repayment and unbeatable 
interest rates. 

The interest rate is just 8% APR 
for firsMime borrowers. 

That's much lower than the interest rate 
for most other types of loans. Qualifying is 
easy, and repayment doesn't begin until six 
months after the student is no longer on full 
or half time status (with up to 10 years to repay). 

Undergraduate students can borrow up to 
$2,625 per year with a maximum total of $17,250 
Graduate students can borrow up to $7,500 



per year with a maximum total of $54,750 
for both undergraduate and graduate studies. 
(The amount you qualify to borrow is deter- 
mined by your Financial Aid Office based 
on your estimated cost of attendance, family 
contributions and any other aid you receive.) 

Apply Now! 

To get your application and processing instruc- 
tions, simply complete and return the coupon 
found below, or call your nearest First 
Commerce Corporation bank. 

I 
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Please Send Me An Application for a Government 
Guaranteed Student Loan 



Name 

Address . 

City 

School _ 



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Return completed coupon to: 

FIRST COMMERCE CORPORATION 
ATTN: STUDENT LENDING DEPARTMENT 
P.O.BOX 60279 
NEW ORLEANS, LA 70160-0279 



FIRST COMMERCE 



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Rapides Bank & Trust Co., Alexandria 
318/487-2431 



City National Bank of Baton Rouge 
504/387-2151 

First National Bank of Lake Charles First NBC, New Orleans 

318/477-7630 504/582-7401 



First National Bank of Lafayette 
318/232-3200 



SEPTEMBER 20, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 8 



CAMPUS LINE 













Theta Chi 

The brothers of Eta Omicron 
chapter of Theta Chi fraternity take 
pride in announcing their Fall 1988 
pledge class: Rob Brown, Jerry 
Stephens, Donald Boyett, Kevin Hat- 
taway, William Foiani, Charles Cox, 
Tony Means, Paul Carter, Marty Bra- 
nham, Jeremy Passut, Ray Moore, Jay 
Krance, Bob Harm an, and Geof 
DeWuff. 

We would also like to take this 
time to congratulate our delegation to 
the Theta Chi National Convention 
held in Atlanta, Georgia. Joel Ebarb, 
Anthony Branham, and delegate Andy 
Harrison all received Key Man awards 
for attending all convention sessions. 

Sigma Tau Gamma 

Sigma Tau Gamma Rose Court 
will hold a car wash Thursday, Sept, 
22 at Mr. Gatti's from 2 to 6 p.m. 

Kappa Alpha 

Kappa Alpha will be holding 
their annual Slave Auction on Sep- 
tember 22 at 8 p.m. at the Mansion on 
the Hill. Cash, checks, and all major 
credit cards will be honored. 

Phi Mu 

Phi Mu is raffling a Samurai 
Jeep. Any interested persons should 
contact a Phi Mu active or provi- 
sional member. An amount of $5 
will allow a person two chances at 
winning the jeep. 

Tri-Sigma 

The members of Sigma Sigma 
Sigma would like to congratulate 
Karen Engeron and Karen Guidry 
for being selected to the 1988 
Homecoming Court. Best of luck to 
Kirsten Gernhauser, Sonya Rigaud, 
and Cindy Ross in the runoff. 

Sigma Kappa 

Sigma Kappa will host a car 
wash Saturday, Sept. 24 at Mr. 
Gatti's from 1 1 a.m.-2 p.m. Tick- 
ets will be sold until the car wash at 
$2 per ticket 

They will hold their annual 
"Dream Man" dance on Wednesday. 
Sept. 21 at 8 p.m. at the Northwest- 
ern Recreation Complex. It is 
invitation only. 

NAIT 

The National Association of 
Industrial Technology (NAIT) will 
meet Thursday, September 22, in 
Room 203 of Williamson Hall. All IT 
majors are invited to attend. Refresh- 
ments will be served. 

Homecoming 

All organizations, fraternities, 
and sororities must turn in their 
Homecoming float and Mr. Home- 
coming forms into the SAB office to 
Lisa Lukowski by Sept. 21 . Remem- 
ber we need everyone's cooperation 
and support to make "Homecoming 
Simply Irresistable." 



Le Cercle Francais 

Our next meeting is Thursday, 
September 22, at 1 1 a.m. in Room 315 
of the Student Union. 



Star gazing 

Open viewing sessions will be 
held in the observatory every second 
and fourth Thursday of each month at 
9:00 p.m. for those interested in see- 
ing the stars. 

Any students interested in these 
viewing sessions should meet on the 
front steps of Fournet Hall. These 
steps are on the side of Foumet Hall 
that faces the University Police Sta- 
tion. Interested students should call at 
357-5501 in order to be scheduled for 
a session since no more than 25 people 
can be admitted at one time. 

The First session is set for Sep- 
tember 22. Sessions will not be held 
if the sky is overcast. 

College Republicans 

Northwestern State University's 
College Republican organization will 
meet Thursday, Sept. 22 at 1 1a.m. in 
room 214 of the Student Union. All 
Republicans are encouraged to attend. 

Basketball Officials 

Natchitoches basketball officials 
will have a meeting Monday, Sept. 26 
at 6:30 at the 9th grade center for 
anyone interested in referring high 
school basketball. 



Chartered Organizations 

All chartered organizations on 
campus must fill out a request for 
semester renewal of recognition. Fail- 
ure to file a card indicates the organi- 
zation is no longer active on campus 
and will be omitted from the univer- 
sity publications and denied use of 
facilities. Deadline for submitting the 
renewal card is Oct. 1 . Please return 
all cards to Rm. 214 in the Student 
Union. 

All organizations are required 
to maintain a Northwestern Post Of- 
fice Box in the organization's name. 
The only exception is to have the mail 
received at department, e.g. Asso. of 
the US . Army-Military Science Dept. 

All events must be placed on the 
University Master Calendar. 

Purple Jackets 

The next Purple Jackets meet- 
ing will be Thursday, Sept. 29 at 5 
p.m. 

FCS 

The Fellowship of Christian 
Students will be meeting every 
Wednesday from 7 p.m. til 8:30 p.m. 
in Rm. 320 of the Student Union. 
Everyone is welcomeand encouraged 
to attend. 



Young Democrats 

Join the party ... the Demo- 
cratic party. Young Democrat meet- 
ings will be held on Thursdays at 1 1 
a.m. in Rm. 320 in the Student Union. 

SAB 

The Public Relations and Ad- 
vertising and the Hospitality and 
Decorations committees of the Stu- 
dent Activities Board will meet in 
Rm . 2 14 of the Student Union, at 2:30 
p.m. Thursday. Special Events com- 
mittee will meet at 1 1 a.m. Thursday 
in Rm. 214. 

The position for Concert chair- 
man is open. Anyone interested should 
go by the SAB office. 

Rick Kelley will be appearing in 
the Student Union Ballroom Friday, 
Sept. 23 at 7:30 p.m. 

Current Sauce 

The Current Sauce staff meet- 
ings will be every Tuesday at 5 p.m. in 
Rm.225 KyserHall. 



Lecture series 

Dr. Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. will 
speak on Thursday, Sept. 28 at 1 1 a.m. 
The topic will be the Cycles of Ameri- 
can History. 



Library Orientation 

Freshmen, if you have not 
signed up for the four class meetings 
of library orientation, see a reference 
librarian in Watson Library. 

Section assignments are 
complete. Those who have signed up 
should receive their notification soon. 
If you get no notification, stop by the 
library before October 3. 

Sections are posted across 
from the circulation desk. Somepeople 
gave dorm room numbers as their 
campus address. They should come to 
the library to verify their section 
numbers. 

SAM 

The Society for the Advance- 
ment of Management will meet on 
Thursday, September 22, at 1 1 a.m. in 
Room 102 of the Business Building. 

Wesley Foundation 

The Wesley Foundation is the 
Methodist Student Center located at 
520Collcge Ave. across from Alumni 
Center. Persons of any denomination 
are invited to visit. The director is 
Rev. Ryan Horton and the assistant 
director/counselor is Mickie 
Townsend. 



The Foundation is off to a run- 
ning start this year and has already 
planned a busy fall semester. Weekly 
activities include Monday night 
movies at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday lunch- 
eons from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 
and Wednesday night recreation at 
the First United Methodist Church on 
Second St. with rollerskating, volley- 
ball, basketball, etc. There are also 
informal, non-denominational chapel 
services at 5 p.m. on Sundays fol- 
lowed by dinner. 

All of the above activities are 
free except for the Tuesday lunch- 
eons. These luncheons only cost 50 
cents per meal. The members of the 
Wesley Foundation would like to 
encourage everyone to join in any or 
all of the activities offered. 

At the fall planning session the 
Everyone is welcome to go by 
and visit. The Wesley Foundation 
hours are 8 a.m. -9 p.m. on Monday- 
Thursday; 8 a.m.-5 p.m. on Friday; 
closed on Saturday and 4 p.m.-9 p.m. 
on Sunday. 

Argus fall contest 

The deadline for Argus' fall 
contest is November 1. Cash prizes 
will be awarded for the best fiction, 
poetry, and personal essays. 

The first place entry in each of 



these categories will earn a $50 prize 
Second place will earn a $35 prize 
and third place will earn a $25 prize' 
Also, a prize of $50 will be awarded 
for the single best one-act play. 

In addition to the three prizew- 
inners in poetry, five unranked honor- 
able mentions will be chosen. These 
will not earn any prize money, but 
they will be assured publication in the 
magazine. 

One honorable mention will 
be selected in fiction as well. 

Those who wish to submit 
material for consideration should 
obtain cover sheets from the Argus 
office.complete them, and attach them 
to their manuscripts. Only the social 
security number should appear on the 
manuscript itself. All entries must be 
typewritten. 

Any submissions failing to 
meet these simple requirements will 
not be considered. These instructions 
are also posted on the Argus office 
door. Completed submissions and 
cover sheets should be turned in to 
Argus, Room 3 16A, Kyser Hall. 

All students are still invited 
to become members of the Argus staff. 
Staffers hang flyers, help select the 
content of the magazine, assist with 
production and distribution, and copy- 
edit. 



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SEPTEMBER 27, 1988 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 
OF LOUISIANA 



VOL. 77, NO. 9 



Homecoming activities fire up Northwestern 



1 



— 



— 




Mary Miller 
1988 Homecoming Queen 



L. 




Cindy Bethel 




Karen Engeron 




Melissa Frank 




Kirsten Gernhauser 




Karen Guidry 




Melody Smith 





Kim Wilson 



By CAROLINE WARD 
Staff Writer 

Once again the time has come to 
get fired up for Homecoming, and 
Homecoming this year is "Simply 
Irresistible." The thing that makes 
this weekend one of the best week- 
ends of the year is student enthusiasm. 

The Student Activities 
Board(S AB) and the Student Govern- 
ment Association(SGA)haveplanned 
many exciting activities to encourage 
student body participation. 

Activities kick off on Wednes- 
day night, September 29 with the Ray 
Charles concert. Also performing at 
the concert are the 17-member Ray 
Charles Orchestra and the Raelettes. 
The concert will be held at 8: 15 p.m. 
in Prather Coliseum. 

The excitement continues on 
Thursday, September 30. According 
toLisaLukowski.SABSpecialEvents 
chairperson, there will be a Mr. Home- 
coming Pageant at 7 p.m. in the Stu- 
dent Union Ballroom. The winner of 
the pageant will receive $50 cash and 
a $25 gift certificate to the Mariner 
Restaurant 

Door prizes will also be given 



out to those present at the pageant. 

Following the pageant, students 
can enjoy the humor of The Barber 
and Seville. This act combines humor 
with ventriloquism. 

Official weekend activities get 
started on Friday, September 3 1 with 
the Homecoming Golf Tournamentat 
1 p.m. and an Alumni Dinner at 6:30 
p.m. at the Robert W. Wilson Sr. 
Recreation Complex. 

The Homecoming Parade be- 
gins at 5:30 p.m. Friday on the river- 
bank in downtown Natchitoches. 
From the riverbank, the parade is 
scheduled to travel to the Prather 
Coliseum parking lot. Following the 
parade there will be pep rally activi- 
ties. Such activities include perform- 
ances by the Demon Yell Leaders and 
the Pompom Line. There will also be 
a mock-funeral for the Southwest 
Texas Bobcat. A eulogy will be read 
for the bobcat by Michael McHale, 
president of SG A, and then the bobcat 
will be burned atop a bonfire. 

Then on Saturday, October 1, 
the final climactic day of Homecom- 
ing 1988 begins. Activities start with 
the Ladies Bingo Brunch at 10 a.m. at 



the Recreation Complex, the Demon 
Cheerleader Reunion at 10 am. in 
Room 320 of the Student Union, the 
LadyoftheBraceletReunionat 10:30 
a.m. in the Alumni Center, the class of 
1938's 50-year reunion at 10 a.m. in 
the President's Room of the Student 
Union, the class of 1944's reunion at 
10 a.m. in the Student Union's Cane 
River Room, and the Alumni Lunch- 
eon at noon in the Student Union 
Ballroom. 

Finally, the big event begins for 
Northwestern's 104th Homecoming. 
John Fred and the Playboys will pro- 
vide the music for the tailgate party 
from 11 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. Then at 
2 p.m. the Northwestern Demons face 
the Southwest Texas Bobcats in Tur- 
pin Stadium. 

The Homecoming Court that the 
student body selected includes nine 
"Simply Irresistible" women. The 
court will be introduced at the pep 
rally on Friday night. They will not 
formally be presented until the 
half time show of Saturday's football 
game. 

Selected to reign as queen of the 
1988 Homecoming Court is Mary 



Miller. Mary is a sophomore major- 
ing in sociology. She is from Baton 
Rouge, is president of the SAB, social 
chairman for the Sigma Kappa na- 
tional social sorority, and a "LiT Sis" 
of the Tau Kappa Epsilon 

The other eight members of the 
1988 Homecoming Court include: 
Cindy Bethel, sophomore journalism 
major from Mansfield; Elizabeth 
Bonnette, sophomore from Winnfield 
attending Louisiana Scholars' Col- 
lege; Karen Engeron, sophomore 
political science major from Houma; 
Melody Smith, a senior elementary 
teaching major from Leesville; 
Melissa Frank, junior anthropology 
major from Mamou; Kirsten 
Gernhauser, junior physical educa- 
tion major from Chalmette; and Karen 
Guidry, senior mathematics major 
from LaRose; Kim Wilson, a senior 
elementary teaching major from Ba- 
ton Rouge. 

Once again, SAB and SGA ask 
the students of Northwestern to play 
an active role in this weeks' Home- 
coming 1988 festivities. Help make 
this year's Homecoming "Simply Ir- 
resistible." 



Schlesinger talks politics 



By H. SCOTT JOLLEY 
Staff Writer 

"The time of change is always 
upon us... conservatism and innova- 
tion dispute for the possession of the 
world," saidDr. Arthur Schlesinger at 
a lecture in Northwestern's Fine Arts 
Auditorium on September 22. Sch- 
lesinger, a noted writer and historian, 
was on campus as a part of the Distin- 
guished Lecture Series. 

Since the topic of his speech 
was the cycles of history, Schlesinger 
described how cyclical patterns can 
be observed in the history of the world. 
Quoting Henry Adams, he remarked 
that " 'It is twelve years for the beat of 
the pendulum. After 1776, it took 
twelve years to create a Constitution 
and another twelve years to bring about 
a reaction to the government.'" 

"It is more of a 24- to 30-year 
cycle," said Schlesinger, "from cen- 
tralization and patriotism to the diffu- 
sion of nationalism." Citing a "wiser 
and better historian — my father," he 
pointed out that history tends to swing 
in two directions: "It goes from con- 
servative with the concerns of the 
few, to liberal with the concerns of 
all." 

"If you look at Reagan's era of 
private interest, it is a reenactment of 
Eisenhower's administration," he said, 



"just as that was a replay of the Har- 
ding-Coolidge years, which resembled 
Cleveland's term." The same obser- 
vation be seen in the Democratic party, 
said Schlesinger. "In 1901, there was 
Teddy Roosevelt, then in 1 932 we had 
FDR's New Deal, and again in 1960 
there was the New Frontier of John 
Kennedy." 

Schlesinger remarked that the 
political conscience of young people 
"usually awakens during the ages of 
16 to 25." He also observed that 
young people who "grew up in the age 
of FDR will more than likely use 
FDR's ideals when they are old enough 
to run for public office." The same 
holds true, he said, for the "baby 
boomers" who grew up with John 
Kennedy and for those who are now 
growing up in the Reagan era. 

These tides of political interest 
follow the cyclical pattern he de- 
scribed. "A good deal of politics is 
physiological. Public action with the 
liberals leaves the electorate disen- 
chanted while the hedonism of the 
private interest conservatives runs its 
course too." 

The conservatives of today, said 
Schlesinger, are becoming more lib- 
eral. "They seek some meaning other 
than the fast buck and themselves." 
The historian pointed out that the 




conservative movement gained 
strength in the 1920's,the 1950's,and 
again in the 1980's. 

"Having lived to the age of 70, 1 
have seen the changes," Schlesinger 
joked. "But since I have seen the 
•cycle come around, I know that it is 
self-sufficient and self-generating 
aside from catastrophes that occur that 
may alter it." The pattern of history 
can be measured "in a heartbeat, in the 
tides, in night and day." 

Schlesinger said, "To quote 
Adam Smith from his Wealth of Na- 
tions: 'We always seek to better our- 



selves from the womb to the grave. 
Between those two moments, no man 
ever has enough that he will not want 
to change.'" He also quoted philoso- 
pher Immanuel Kant in saying, '"Give 
a man everything and it will not be 
everything.'" 

He went to say that the Ameri- 
can public generally tires of these 
cycles of either liberalism or conser- 
vatism and eventually want a change 
"In the 1920's, after two presidents 

History... continued 
on page 8 



Argus selections to be chosen 



By Shannon J. Greer 
Staff Writer 

The best writings of North- 
western students are published each 
spring in Argus, Northwestern's lit- 
erary magazine. 

Argus consists of poetry, 
prose, artwork and photography. 
Entries are selected through one con- 
test held in the fall and a second in the 
spring. 

"Our magazine serves as a 
creative outlet for the students of 
Northwestern," said Gynger Ingram, 
Argus editor. "We try to publish only 
student work." 

Dr. Sara Burroughs, Argus' 
advisor since January 1988, said that 



she would like to see students write 
about what they know. "I'dliketosee 
short stories about what it's like to be 
a college student in the '80's and 
humorous personal essays," said Dr. 
Burroughs. 

Dr. Burroughs plans to enter Argus 
in the Southern Literary Festival 
contest held each spring in Missis- 
sippi. 

The deadline for Argus' fall 
contest is November 1. Cash prizes 
will be awarded for the best fiction, 
poetry and personal essays. 

The first-place entry in each 
of these categories will earn a $50 
prize. Second place will earn a $35 
prize and third place, $25. Also, a 



prize of $50 will be awarded for the 
single best one-act play. 

Five unranked honorable 
mentions will be chosen in poetry in 
addition to the three prizewinners. 
These will not earn any prize money, 
but they will be published in the next 
Argus. 

One honorable mention will 
be selected in fiction as well. 

Those who wish to submit 
material for consideration should 
obtain cover sheets from the Argus 
office, complete them and attach them 
to their manuscripts. Only the social 
security number should appear on the 
manuscript itself. All entries must be 
typewritten. 



Any submissions failing to 
meet these requirements will not be 
considered. Completed submissions 
and cover sheets should be turned in 
to Argus, Room 316A, Kyser Hall. 

Winners will be announced 
before the end of the fall semester. 

All students are invited to join 
the Argus staff. Staff members hang 
flyers, help select the content of the 
magazine, assist with the production 
and distribution, and copy-edit. 

Founded in 1976, Argus was 
first sold as a newsstand magazine. It 
is now overseen by the Student Publi- 
cation Committee and is funded by 
student fees. 



Ray Charles will perform at Prather Coliseum on Wednesday, 
September 28 at 8:15 p.m. Free tickets can be obtained at the 
Fine Arts building with a valid Northwestern student LP. 



i 



SEPTEMBER 27, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 2 



NT GOVERNMENT 
IATI0N IS HERE FOR YOU!! 






LETTER FROM THE SGA 
Dear Students: 
Allow us to welcome all of you back for a new 
semester. We hope your summer was enjoyable. SGA 
has many programs available to you this semester, 
and we encourage you to take advantage of these pro- 
grams. We also encourage you to get involved in SGA. 
Because your feelings and opinions direct our decis- 
ions toward better student life at NSU, please feel 
free to come by the SGA office and talk with us. The 
office is always open for your input. Have a great 
semester! 

With the kindest wishes, 
The SGA 




SERVICES AND PROGRAMS: 

* STUDENT DISCOUNT PROGRAM- 
get great discounts with your NSU 
LD.j 

* TUTOR REFERRAL SERVICE-we'll 
find you a tutor* 

* LOAN PROGRAM- You can borrow 
up to $50.00 with no interest! 
The Loan Office hours are 
Monday-Fridday, 1-4 p.m. 

* FREE LEGAL ASSISTANCE-Protect 
your legal rights with free legal 
counseling by our students and 
professionals. 

* VOTER REGISTRATION-We make it 
easier for you to vote by offering 

registration in the Natchitoches 
area. 

* STUDENT ELECTIONS-Vote for SGA 
Senators and Officers, as well as 
Homecoming Court and Class 
Sweethearts. 



SGA, 



Student 



Government Association, is 
an organization for and of 
the students. Much like the 
United States government, 
SGA is composed of three 
branches — the legislative 
branch, the judicial branch, 
and the executive branch. 
Students within these 
branches work closely with 
the faculty and administra- 
tion in representing you 
and providing for your 
needs as students. SGA is 
taking positive steps for 
you with services, pro- 
grams, and projects de- 
signed to improve and en- 
hance your life at North- 
western. 



GET INVOLVEDWITH SGA 




...AS AN ASSISTANT IN THE 

PRESIDENT'S CABINET!! 
Be an assistant to one of the SGA Execu- 
tive Cabinet Members. As an assistant 
you would be actively involved in organ 
izing, promoting and creating SGA pro- 
grams, services and events. The follow- 
ing Assistant positions are open: 

* Public Relations 

* Student Life 

* Parliamentarian 



...AS A CABINET AIDE!!! 
Freshmen, an ideal way to get involved is 
to be a CABINET AIDE. It's an exciting 
way to meet new people and learn about 
SGA. Cabinet Aides work closely on 
projects within the legislative, executive 
and judicial branches of SGA. If you 
would like to get in on the action, con- 
tact the SGA office for details! There is a 
position waiting to be filled by you. 



...IN THE SENATE 

Senate positions are open every 
semester. All students are invited 
to attend the weekly Senate' 
meetings on Monday at 6:30 p.m., 
Room 221 of the Student Union 



...AS A SUPREME COURT 
JUSTICE!!! 

Serve as a Supreme Court Justice! You 
will have the final word in the interpreta- 
tion of SGA Constitution. Gain valuable 
experience and play an integral part of 
the decision making processes in SGA! 
Positions are now open - apply in the 
SGA office today! 



...ON A COMMITTEE!!! 

You can serve on various committees in 
SGA or represent students by serving on 
other campus committees. Be active in 
student concerns! 



PAGE 3 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 27, 1988 




One for the books 

Pat f s to continue student text trade 



MICHELLE WEEGO 
paging Editor 

Pat's Economy Store will con- 
je to function as a used textbook 
5plier for Norwestern students after 
,ing a successful first semester in 
|t>uy-back business. 

The Natchitoches school supply 
ie, at 912 College Ave., began 
ring used books from Northwest- 
i students last May in competition 
I Wallace Bookstores Incorpo- 
5d, located on campus. At that time, 
j's Economy Store bought back all, 
■d textbooks with a national whole- 
is value although Northwestern re- 
fed to send the store a faculty book 
jof this semester's textbooks. 



Lee Waskom, owner of Pat's 
Economy, said, "We did pretty well, 
but not as well as I hoped. I bought a 
lot of books last semester that they 
aren't using anymore." 

"Northwestern finally gave me a 
book list but only after I had bought 
back textbooks from last semester," 
Waskom said. "There were a lot of 
new books ordered this year." 

Waskom plans on specializing 
in used textbooks rather that new. "I 
want to concentrate on being known 
as a used book supplier," Waskom 
said. 

"Wholesalers and the publishers 
I'm dealing with think I did very well," 
the store owner said. "They all felt 



excited that I was onboard as an off- 
campus textbook supplier." 

Pat's refund policy is very simi- 
lar to that of the university bookstore ' s. 
The Natchitoches store will buy back 
books all year long at least 30% of the 
wholesale price. Waskom promises 
that if there' s a better price, he will pay 
it 

During finals week, all books 
will be bought back at 50% of the 
wholesale price. "Any difference in 
the buy-back price between Pat's and 
Wallace's will depend on the sale 
price," Waskom said. "I intend to give 
back 1/2 of my original cost of the 
book." 

The prices between the two 



supply stores are very similar. An 
economy book found at both places 
cost S38.89 at Pat's and $39.70 at 
Wallace's. 

In time, Waskom intends to sell 
more Northwestern oriented supplies. 
"I already sell the same basic book 
supplies that Wallace's does as well as 
lab and drafting items ," Waskom said. 

"I'm going to start slowly," he 
stated. "I'm slowly learning what I 
need to sell. We plan to include every- 
thing students need for class." 

Waskom intends to wait on or- 
dering Northwestern t-shirts and 
specialty items. "At this moment I'm 
not going to jump into it. I'm just 
-?oing to take my time." 



Organizations! 

Don't forget to 
renew your charter! 
For more information, 
see page 8. 



LOST 



LADIES GOLD NUG- 
GET RING WITH DIA- 
MOND. IF FOUND 
PLEASE RETURN TO 
CAMPUS POLICE. 

REWARD. 



Uumni events scheduled 



lURIE LeBLANC 
Writer 

Alumni Homecoming festivities 
11 kick off at 1 p.m. on Friday, 
stember 30, at the Robert W. 
Json,Sr. Recreation Complex. 

First on the agenda is the Alumni 
Jf Tournament . This is followed 
ajambalaya dinner which will be 
vedat6:30p.m. The Northwestern 
11 Leaders will be on hand to raise 
rits in addition to the night's en ter- 
unent at the Complex. 

Homecoming Day activities will 
;in at 9 a.m. with Alumni Registra- 
nat the Alumni Center. At 10 a.m., 
re will be a Ladies Bingo Brunch at 
: Recreational Complex, the "N" 
ib Hall of Fame Induction will be in 
i Purple and White Room in the 
rthwestern Field House, and the 
amni and Foundation Board Meet- 
jwill be conducted in Room 321 in 
iSylvan Friedman Student Union. 

Homecoming Day will also be a 
yof reunions in the Student Union. 
10 a.m. the Class of 1938 will hold 



its 50 year reunion in the President's 
Room, the Class of 1944 will hold its 
reunion in Cane River Room and pre- 
vious Northwestern Cheerleaders will 
reunite in Room 320. At 10:30 a.m., 
former title holders of the Lady of the 
Bracelet Pageant will meet in the 
Alumni Center. 

An Alumni Luncheon and the 
Annual Alumni General Meeting will 
be held in the Student Union Ballroom 
at noon. The Class of 1938 will be 
honored at the luncheon. 

Following the game there will 
be an "N" Club gathering in the Elk's 
Lodge in downtown Natchitoches. 

Homecoming weekend will 
wrap up Sunday, October 2, with a 
Tennis Tournament at the Northwest- 
ern Tennis Complex. 

Elise James, director of External 
Affairs, summed up the spirit of 
Homecoming by saying, "Homecom- 
ing is a special time when Alumni 
come back to see what is really going 
on. We welcome and encourage 
alumni to visit campus this weekend. 
It will make you feel good." 



Good Luck 

DEMONS! 

Beat Southwest 
Texas State 

from the friendly staff at 

Guys & Gals 

We have the latest in hair fashion 
Call for appointment, walk-ins welcome 
Located in the Student Union 
Phone 357-5451 



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HOMECOMING SPECIALS 

Sales Every Day! 

Tuesday-Ladies Day 

featuring shirts on sale 





Wednesday -Pep Day 

Foam hands, shakers, 
megaphones on sale 



Thursday-Men's Day 
Caps on sale ^jj^ 

Friday -Stick 'Em Day 

We haue a uariety of items 



GOOD LUCK DEMONS! 

from your 
University Bookstore 






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other offer. Limit 1 coupon per customer 
per visit. Expires October 3,1988 



OPEN 24 HOURS 

357-8198 



SEPTEMBER 27, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 4 




ISEP offers change 



By H. SCOTT JOLLEY 
Staff Writer 

Imagine simply paying your 
Northwestern fees and going to school 
at a place where there are no long lines 
at the computer center, no over- 
crowded parking lots, and no Iberville 
Dining Halls. That's what two NSU 
students did recently by participating 
in the International Student Exchange 
Program (ISEP). 

John Rees, a senior from Natchi- 
toches, spent last year on the small 
island of Malta in the Mediterranean 
Sea. Located about fifty miles south 
of Sicily, Malta was an ideal spot for 
Rees because "my parents were sta- 
tioned in Sicily on a military base and 
everyone spoke English on Malta. It 
fit me perfectly." 

Attending Maltese University 
took up most of Rees' time. "I went to 
school from October to May and we 
had the same courses throughout the 
year." The caseload was difficult, he 
reports, especial ly since there were no 
textbooks and most of the class period 
was lecture. "Nearly everybody 
worked in the library. It was a lot of 
work on your own." There were only 
two test administered during the year: 
mid- terms and finals. 

Housing in Malta was quite dif- 
ferent from Northwestern's dormito- 
ries. "Since the island is so small, 
there are no needs for dorms. Every- 
body lived at home, but a lot of the 
parents didn ' t want them to leave until 
they were married." 

According to Rees, the climate 
of Malta was very similar to that of 
Natchitoches. "Geographically, Malta 
is about on a level with Arkansas, so it 
felt like home a lot." The island was 
almost always windy, but it hardly 
rained. "We never got any snow, just 
like Natchitoches." 

After school was over, Rees 
spent three weeks on a train touring 



Europe, visiting the countries of Italy , 
Germany, Switzerland, Holland, Bel- 
gium, Denmark, France, and England. 

Another senior from Natchito- 
ches, Todd Keenan, went abroad last 
year via ISEP. After he had paid his 
NSU fees, Keenan enrolled at the 
college of Strathclyde in Glasgow, 
Scotland. 

"The classes were difficult," said 
Keenan, "because of the way they 
were scheduled." His classes, which 
included German, English, Political 
Science, and two History courses, each 
lasted the entire year. ] 

Like Rees, Keenan's tests were 
administered only once. "We had one 
final and it was either pass or fail. We 
were given three hours to write three 
essays of 3-500 words each." 

The students at Glasgow, said 
Keenan, were much more involved in 
politics than those at NSU. "They 
were very radical and into protesting. 
When they got started, it was like a 
swarm," he said. 

Keenan's reason for choosing 
Scotland was similar to Rees' deci- 
sion. "I couldn't speak a foreign lan- 
guage and since the schools in Scot- 
land are, for the most part, better than 
those in England, I picked Strathclyde 
in Scotland." 

However, unlike Rees, he did 
not have any relatives overseas. "I ran 
into a few Keenans over there, but I 
didn't know them. I'm not sure if 
we're related." 

Prospective exchange students 
who wish to travel with the Interna- 
tional Student Exchange Program 
must have at least a 3.0 grade point 
average, according to ISEP coordina- 
tor Tommy Whitehead. The student 
must also have three recommenda- 
tions from Northwestern faculty. 
Students must also compete with other 
applicants from other universities 
nation-wide for the overseas slot. 



LOB plans ahead 



By ANNE MILLER 
Staff Writer 

This year's Miss Lady of the 
Bracelet Pageant, one of the most 
popular events at Northwestern, is 
already in the planning stages. The 
preliminary to the Miss Louisiana 
Pageant is set for Friday, January 27. 

Applications go out on October 
25. Nominationswillbeaccepted after 
this date. Nominations, however, are 
not necessary to be a contestant. 

There will be a series of teas/, 
interest parties for all interested girls. 
The first interest party will be on 
October 4 at 6:30 in the presidents' 
room in the Student Union. Here the 
pageant procedure will be explained 
to the girls. All questions will be an- 
swered and the necessary information 
will be explained. 

"I think the earlier everyone is 
informed and becomes interested, the 
easier it will be on the girls to prepare 
for the pageant," said Christy Messer, 
chairman of the LOB committee. 
"They alsocan begin preparing for the 
talent competition early since that is 
what usually makes the girls the most 
nervous." 

Also provided for the girls will 
be a positive-self seminar in which a 
knowledgeable professional will give 
advice in the areas of pageant ma- 
keup, poise and dress. 

This is not an ordinary year for- 
the pageant. This is it's 30th anniver- 
sary. In accordance with this fact the 
theme of this year's pageant is "Thirty 
Years of Pultin' on the Ritz." 

"We are all very excited about 
the pageant's 30th anniversary. We 



expect it to be a very positive year for 
the LOB tradition," Messer said. 

Miss LOB represents North- 
western at other pageants, festivals, 
fairs and many other events. It is one 
the most prominent student honors at 
Northwestern. 

Itall began in the early twenties, 
when the first beauty pageant, spon- 
sored by the Potpourri, was held on 
campus. In 1958, Miss Kahne Di- 
poala was crowned the first Miss LOB . 
She received a solid gold bracelet to 
wear in public when she represented 
the university. That same bracelet has 
been passed down from queen to 
queen. 

in 1971, the Student Union 
Governing Board (now the SAB), 
through the efforts of Robert W. 
Wilson Sr. bought the first franchise 
for the Miss Louisiana Pageant There- 
fore enabling Miss LOB to enter the 
contest. In 1980,Miss LOB Zina 
Curlee was first runner up in the Miss 
Louisiana Pageant. 

"The LOB is a cherished tradi- 
tion at Northwestern. The SAB is 
already planning and coordinating the 
pageant and we are looking for it to be 
a tremendous success this year," said 
Skeeter Henry, director of organiza- 
tions and student activities. 

The pageant is a valuable expe- 
rience for all involved. It improves the 
contestants' confidence and self-im- 
age. It is also an opportunity to meet 
people and get involved in school. 

Anyone interested in helping 
with the pageant or have questions on 
being a contestant should contact 
Christy Messer in the SAB office, 
room 214 in the Student Union. 



SGA, Young Democrats, 
& College Republicans 
sponsor 

VOTER REGISTRATION DRIVE 
Thursday, Sept. 29 
9 a.m. until noon 
S.U. Lobby 

Bring proof of age and proof that you 
are a Natchitoches parish resident. 

WE URGE ALL STUDENTS 
TO REGISTER TO VOTE! 



How well are freshmen adapting? 

Freshmen courtesy calls 
made to obtain feedback 



By ELIZABETH McDAVID 
Staff Writer 

People often say that the change 
from life in high school to life in 
college is one of the biggest adjust- 
ments that a student makes. Retention 
Coordinator Gail Jones wants to make 
sure that students were adapting to 
this change without any major prob- 
lems. 

Jones, along with Laura McClel- 
land, Chrissy Dunavent, and admis- 
sion recruiter Marleen Edwards have 
been making courtesy calls to every 
student in the freshman class. Origi- 
nally, the calls were made from the 
Alumni House, but now they are made 
from the Purple and White Room of 
the Northwestern Field House because 
there is more space and more tele- 
phone lines. 

The telephone calls are made 



every Monday , Tuesday , and Wednes- 
day from 5 to 8 p.m. The calls began 
on September 10, and will continue 
until every freshman has been called. 

Many of the questions asked are 
about classes, teachers, dorms, resi- 
dential advisors and roommates. 

"The responses have been good. 
Most students gave very positive feed- 
back. The students were eager to talk 
about the football games, as well as 
their weekends," Jones said. 

Although most students said they 
were satisfied, there were also some 
complaints. "Freshman living on the 
third floor of Sabine Hall complained 
of problems with the showers. The 
other complaints have been about the 
air conditioning. We are working on 
taking care of any problems," Jones 
said. 



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Wednesday, September 28 
Student Body Homecoming Exchange 
UN KAPPA FIFTH-Bar Drinks-$4 all you can drink 
I TAPPA KEG-Draft Becr-$3 all you can drink 
"No Cover Required" 

Thursday, September 29 

A Rapper's Homecoming 
Rap Contest w/ Prizes-details that night 
"Fresh" Tom & Vodka Collins $1 all night 
"Homeboy" Beer Bust $4 all night 

Friday, September 30 
Friday Fiesta Pre-Game Party 
Coors Light "Silver Bullet "-$1 all night 
Morgaritas-$1 all night 

Saturday, October 1 
Come Home to the Body- 
and The M/xx-live-after the game!! 



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Activiti 
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PAGE 5 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 27, 1988 



EDITORIAL 



Turnout fervent but small 

Once again, the true spirit of the Northwestern State student body has shown through. The Demons returned 
to action Saturday night after a road game in Reno, an off week, and almost nonexisten student support at 
the away game. Granted, the group that was there was vocal and helped the Demons to a great win, but why the 
small turnout? 

It appears from this vantage point that this is a trend that goes back to last year's basketball season. The Lady 
Demons qualified for the Southland Conference playoffs, yet student support at their games were poor. The men's 
team not only qualified for the playoffs but played a first round playoff game in Prather Coliseum, yet we had the 
smallest crowd of the year. What is wrong with Northwestern students? Why do they refuse to support their fellow 
students or get involved in campus activities? 

This disturbing trend is not limited to athletics. Over the last year, the Student Life Office, the Student 
Activities Board, and the Student Government Association have bent over backwards to provide entertainment 
and other outlets for students, and no one seems to take advantage of their efforts. For example, last spring ' s Expose 
concert had a very small student turn out, and this year' s pregame concerts and parties have also experienced very 
small crowds. I wonder what the attendance will be like at this week's Ray Charles concert, especially considering 
the fact that the tickets for students to see one of the legends of the entertainment world, are free. 

Over the last two years, Northwestern has once again become a vibrant university. However, to become a 
truly great university; academically, socially, and athletically it must have student involvement. There are those 
who say that we don't have the hings that other universities have. They might do well to take a look at themselves 
and ask why. Only then might they see that the only thing that others have that Northwestern doesn't have is the 
involvement of the student body. 

To those of you who say athletics are one of your interests, try it. You might like it. What is your excuse for 
not attending one of the many other activities that are being provided? For those of you who have supported 
athletics and other student activities, I challenge you to try and encourage others to come and join the fun. To those 
of you who complain that there is nothing to do on this campus, you couldn't be more mistaken. Lastly, if there 
is anyone out there who has any suggestions on how to get more students involved in athletics and other campus 
activities, we, as well as the other campus groups, would like to hear from you. However, I hold no great hope of 
hearing from the student body, because experiences like this past Saturday night tell me not to get my hopes up. 
Hope to see you Saturday! 

MARK MOLESWORTH 
Athletic Ticket Manager 



BlFF Has A Jogging, A CCIDENT 




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Current Quotes 



Do you think there's 
enough information about 
AIDS available to students 
on campus? 






Ivan MacDonald 
Pre-law 

Freshman, Baton Rouge 

'Wo, / still think its a little over- 
rated. But some people are a little naive. " 



Sara Tinker 
Accounting 
Freshman, DeQuirtcy 

"There's really not enough infor- 
mation known anywhere about AIDS. It's 
a disease that people always want to hear be as widespread as it is 
more information on. " 



Scherry Jefferies 
Business Administration 
Freshman, DeRidder 

"No, I do not think there is enough 
information on AIDS because it wouldn't 



The CutfenfSauceis publishedweekly during the 
fall and spring semesters by the students of Northwest- 
ern State University of Louisiana. It is not associated 
with any of the University's departments and Is fi- 
nanced independently. 

The Current Sauce is based in the Office of 
Student Publications located in Kyser Hall. The office 
of the editorial staff is 225H , telephone (3 1 8) 357-5456. 
The adviser's office is 103 Kyser Hall, telephone 357- 
5213. 

The mailing address for the Current Sauce is P.O. 
Box 5306, NSU, Natchitoches, LA 71497. 

All correspondence, including letters to the edi- 
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must be mailed to the above address or brought to 
the office. 

The deadline for all advertisement and copy is 3 
p.m. each Friday. Inclusion of any and all material is 
left to the discretion of the editor. 

Letters to the editor should be typed (double- 
spaced), signed and should include a telephone 
numberwhere the writer can be reached. No anony- 
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Current Sauce subscription rates are $11 per 
academic year (28 issues) or $6 per semester (14 
issues). The paper is entered as second-class mail at 
Natchitoches, LA. The USPS number is 140-660. 



SONYA RIGAUD 
Editor 

MICHELLE WEEGO 
Ala nag in g Editor 

MINDYBECK BRAD BODENHEIMER SHANNON BOUFFANIE 
BETH BOWMAN DeANNA COCHRAN H. SCOTT JOLLEY 
LAURIE LeBLANC ELIZABETH McDAVID CHRIS McGEE 
BRIAN McPHEARSON ANNE MILLER RAY MOORE 
CAROLINE WARD 
Staff Writers 



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ALLEN 
EVANS 
Advertising 



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Photographers 

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Cartoonist 



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Circulation/ 
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Current Sauce 
meeting 

Tuesday, 5 p.m. 
225 Kyser 



On the campaign trail 

Dukakis strikes out 

I would like to respond to your article OLYMPI A DUKAKIS STUMPS FOR COUSIN MIKE AT NSU which 
appeared in last week's paper. I want to take this space to go through the article, clear up some statements 
and discuss in more detail these other topics. 

I want to first address the statements of Jack Brittain, Natchitoches Parish Coordinator for Dukakis. He said 
that the questions of Dukakis' patriotic attitudes were "bold face lies that needed to be addressed." To be honest, 
I think this should be questioned and addressed. When the Governor opposes the recitation of The Pledge of 
Allegiance to the Flag by school children, I think someone should question his patriotic attitudes. On May 20, 1 977 
Dukakis VETOED House Bill 5627, which required the recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag in public 
school. The veto was overridden. In both branches, the override vote easily exceeded the required two-thirds 
majority (24-7 in the Senate, 201-27 in the House). Following the vote in the House, representatives broke into 
a rendition of 'God Bless America'. The Senate vote was preceded by a call to approve the bill 'in the name of 
all that's holy and good, apple pie, and motherhood'. Thank God that some of the Massachusetts legislators are 
patriotic. Just in case anyone wants to know, this is very, as Ms Dukakis wanted, ' accurate and truthful'. 

I agree with Ms Dukakis, the need to be addressed. That is what this letter to the editor is for. As State 
Representative, Mr. Dukakis filed bills to LEGALIZE " blasphemy" (House Bill 3483), "abortions" (HB 3756), 
"unnatural and lascivious acts with another person" (HB 3272), "fornication" (HB 3482), and "the crime against 
nature" (HB 3484). WOW, did he forget anything?? Oh yeah, we all know about his vacations for murderers. 

Showing his ignorance in foreign affairs, Dukakis says... "there is no military threat to the security of the 
government of Honduras". Yeah right! Don't we remember the invasion of Honduras by the Soviet backed 

communist Sandanistas?? Oh, I guess that just slipped Mr. Dukakis' well, uh, err— he just forgot. 

So you say, what about his values? Surely he has values? Well, yes he does. I just happen to believe that 
they aren't the same values that we share. He, for example: 
Opposes prayer in public schools 
Supports allowing homosexual couples to adopt children 
Supports abortions on demand 
Supports federal funding of abortions 

Supports amending Civil Rights Act of 1964 to include special rights for gay men and lesbians 

As far as prayer in school Mr. Dukakis puts it best when he says "We've learned that we can't improve America's 
school by .. . putting religion back in the classroom. 'Good education requires more than a right wing and a prayer". 
And as Governor Guy Hunt says "In Michael Dukakis' America, OUR values are FORSAKEN VALUES". 
WOW!! 

And in accordance with Ms Dukakis, thishasall been very "accurate and truthful". Stated as apublic service, 
that the public should know, with malice towards none. 

CLINT PERSON 

NSU College Republicans, President 



A topic needing addressing 

AIDS prevention ignored 



It attacks without prejudice or preference. Whoever it comes 
across it kills. Once you are infected you cannot be cured. The 
cold, hard fact is that AIDS can kill any one of us or any of our loved 
ones. 

Yet many people, including college students, continue to disre- 
gard AIDS as a threat to them. Too many people know far too little 
about the disease many people predict to be worse than the plague. 

Here at Northwestern State University, a learning institution 
and center of knowledge, not even a single pamphlet is available to 
students to help them better understand AIDS. With such a signifi- 
cant sexually active population here, the AIDS issue must be ad- 
dressed. 

Just like any other social disease, AIDS becomes a threat every 
time you have unprotected sex outside of a monogamous relationship. 
But uncharacteristic of other diseases, AIDS will remain hidden for 
at least five years while still being passed from partner to partner 
without anyone suspecting a thing. 

Infected students will not test positive for the HIV virus until 
they leave NSU. But this does not mean that the problem should not 
be dealt with here because the best way to combat any problem is to 
"nip it in the bud." 

What many people don't realize is that AIDS is indeed a serious 
threat to the heterosexual as well as homosexual com m un ity . It is true 
that most of the people infected with the HIV virus are homosexual 
or intravenous drug users. And even though there has been only one 
reported case of AIDS in Natchitoches, the homosexual community 
on campus throughout NSU, Scholar's College and the Louisiana 
School are seriously at risk. 

Who knows if AIDS is present on campus or not? Who knows 
all the ways AIDS can be spread? Who knows if you are in absolutely 
no danger of contracting AIDS here on campus? The answer to all 
these questions is the same: No one. 

I'm not trying to scare everyone into mass hysteria. I'm simply 
trying to point out the fact that no one really knows what's safe and 
what's not. There are too many unknowns with this disease. AIDS 
affects all of us and we need to be better educated about it. What more 
appropriate place to learn about AIDS than at an institution of h igher 
learning? 

Some of the administration, including school nurse Mrs. Jo 
Hargis, feel that it is not the responsibil ity of the university to educate 
its students about the dangers of AIDS. According to Mrs. Hargis, 



information about AIDS has never been available at NSU, nor has 
there ever been any discussion about providing it. 

It's true that the university shouldn't have to tell students that 
they need to wear condoms or use other forms of birth control when 
having sex. But Northwestern does have a moral obligation to its 
students to have information on AIDS readily available, for most 
students cannot fathom the possible ramifications. 

Basic knowledge about AIDS will not be a cure-all, though; 
obviously nothing is. To know how to protect yourself is one thing, but 
to actually take the time to do it in the heat of passion is another. 

One alternative that many colleges across the nation have im- 
plemented is to place condom dispensing machines in dormitory 
bathrooms. Many sexual encounters are not premeditated. They 
simply happen, often times in the guy's room. 

I believe most people would be more apt to use a condom if they 
could simply walk down the hall and get one than drive to Eckerd's. 
In the heat of the moment, no one wants to stop altogether and take 
a car ride, especially after having been drinking. I think there is no 
question that more people would use condoms if they were available 
in the dorms. 

Well, how about it, administration? Is the health of the students 
important enough in order for you to take action and respond to their 
needs? If not, then think about how these machines can benefit you. 
That's right— MONEY! Profit! You know the terms well. 

Why not employ a system or a piece of equipment that will be 
beneficial both to the students and the un iversity as a whole? ! I mean, 
having condoms in dorm bathrooms will not only protect students 
from AIDS, but will protect them from other social disease and 
unwanted pregnancy as well. And if the university cab make money 
off of it, what more is standing in your way? 

As Mrs. Hargis said, AIDS is not only a threat to both heterosex- 
ual and homosexual Northwestern students, but it is also a threat to 
the entire world. Remember, students, condoms are your best de- 
fense against sexually-transm itted diseases. Wear them when there's 
a risk involved. Also. AIDS education must be implemented here on 
campus to make students fully aware of every aspect of this very 
deadly disease. Couple education with condom machines in the 
dorms and we will have a much safer sexual community. And if it's 
not safer, at least this time it won't be Northwestern's fault. 



BRAD BODENHEIMER 
Staff Writer 



SEPTEMBER 27, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 6 



SPORTS 



Former NSU athletes to join 
"N" Club at Homecoming 



NORTHWESTERN— Five former 
Demon athletes and one coach com- 
prise the 1988 Graduate "N" Club 
class that will be inducted in ceremo- 
nies during Northwestern State's 1988 
Homecoming. 

The six — Al Nicosia, Malcolm 
"Deacon" Lewis, Ken Shaw, Vic 
Nyvall, Vernon Wilson and Gene 
Knecht — bring membership in the 
Hall to 97. 

Nicosia, a four year lettermen in 
football and baseball from 1946-50, 
was an all-Gulf States selection in 
baseball, making the team as a catcher 
his junior year (1949) and as a first 
baseman in 1950. His 17 home runs 
topped the GSC his senior year and he 
swatted over .300 in each of his four 
varsity seasons. He was also a football 
all-conference choice following his 
senior year. 

Lewis starred as the starting 
quarterback for Northwestern State's 
undefeated 1966 team and was also 
an outstandingpitcher for NSU's base- 
ball teams of the late 1960's. A foot- 
ball tri-captain in 1967, he was voted 
the Gulf States Conference's Back of 
the Year in 1966 while leading the 
league in scoring. Lewis played base- 
ball in 1966 and 1968. During *66, the 
native of Marshall, Texas posted a 6- 
2 wonyioss record with a 2.39 earned 
run average while leading the GSC in 
strikeouts (67 in 60 innings). In 1 968, 
Lewis went 6-1 on the mound with a 
league-leading 0.59 ERA. He batted 
.313 that season. 



Shaw made his mark as a bas- 
ketball guard for Demon teams during 

1 95 1 - 54. A native of Hoi ton , Indiana, 
Shaw scored 1,184 points in 78 games 
(15.2 average) and snatched 888 re- 
bounds for an 1 1 .4 average — the sec- 
ond best rebound average in school 
hoop history. An honorable mention 
all-GSC pick in 1951-52, Shaw was 
named first team following both the 

1952- 53 and 1953-54 seasons. Shaw, 
who was also a two year letterwinner 
in baseball, is one of just eight players 
in NSU history to score over 1,000 
points and grab at least 700 rebounds. 
He was Northwestern State's all-time 
leading scorer until James Wyatt set a 
new school standard in 1967. 



Nyvall was a sensational gridi- 
ron performer who gained all-Gulf 
States recognition in 1967 and 1968. 
The team MVP in 1967 after placing 
eighth in the nation in punt returns, 
Nyvall eventually set numerous ca- 
reer records during his Demon stay. 
Among those marks were mostrushes 
in a game (3 1 ), most net yards by punt 
return (129), most yards by kickoff 
return (136), most touchdowns in a 
game (three — tied with many others), 
most kicks returned in one season (18) 
and most yards returned by kickoff in 
one season (392). Nyvall currently 
stands in 11th place on the all-time 
NSU scoring list with 108 points. Se- 
lected to Outstanding College Stu- 
dents of America and Who's Who 



among American Colleges and Uni- 
versities in 1970, Nyvall played five 
games as a member of the New Or- 
leans Saints. 

Wilson is one of only three NSU 
all- America basketball players, gain- 
ing that status in 1973. The all-time 
leader in average points per game 
(20.6), Wilson hit for 1,540 points in 
just 75 games. He led the Demons in 
scoring in 1971-72, 1972-73 and 1973- 
74, taking home team MVP honors 
during each of those years. The 1971- 
72 Gulf States Conference Rookie of 
the Year, Wilson was named all- 
Louisiana first team in 1972 and 1973. 
After the 1973-74 season, he was 
named to the NAIA's District 30 first 
team and was a member of the NAIA 
all-star squad that toured Israel.. 

Knecht, still popular figure 
around the NSU community, was a 
two-time Gulf States conference full- 
back for two years and began his 
coaching career at NSU in 1960 under 
then head coach Jack Clayton. Knecht 
tutored the defensive backs until 1972, 
was named defensive coordinator, a 
post he held until 1978. After coach- 
ing under four different head coaches, 
Knecht was named coordinator of 
plant maintenance, a position from 
which he retired this past January. An 
ace recruiter, he brought such greats 
as Al Dodd, Gerald and Ferrell 
Yarbrough, Donnie Kelly , Emmitt and 
Raymond Eddie, Johnny Rae Norman 
and Jerry Fowler into the Demon fold. 




Another Homecoming disaster? 



Demons hope for change 
in annual football game 



By CHRIS McGEE 
Sports Writer 

This year's homecoming game will 
have the NSU Demons facing off 
with the Southwest Texas State Bob- 
cats this Saturday in the 1988 season 
conference opener. 

The mental scars of last season's 
Homecoming game tragedy still exist 
all too vividly and painfully for the 
Demon faithful. Jubilation lifted the 
NSU sideline as the Demons owned a 
31-27 comeback, over Northeast 
Louisiana University, with only one 
second left on the game clock. Sure 
victory, barring a great miracle of 
God. 

With one last breath of time re- 
maining, NLU'sStan Humphries fired 
a high pass with a prayer on it into the 
endzone. The ball deflected off of 
three Demons and landed in the arms 
of NLU's Jackie Harris for the win- 
ning score. 

But as they say: that was then and 
this is now. This is a new Homecom- 
ing game and a new chance. This year 
theDemons face the SouthwestTexas 
State University Bobcats; a team the 
Demons defeated last season, 24-21. 



STSU comes into the game with a 
2-2 record— 0-2 in the Southland 
Conference. Included in that record is 
a 29-27 loss to the defending National 
Champs, the NLU Indians. 

Leading the charge offensively for 
the Bobcats is quarterback Ron Ritti- 
mann, who has already thrown for 
910 yards and 8 TD's this year. Ritti- 
mann is ranked third in the Southland 
Conference in passing. 

Rittiman's two top receivers are 
A.J. Johnson and Mike Murphy, who 
have teamed up for 35 catches, 674 
yards and 3 TD's. Fullbacks Bill Jones 
and Reggie Rivers have rushed a 
combined 402 yards on the ground. 

For the Demons to win they will 
have to establish a passing game in 
order to set up the run. The STSU 
defense depends on size and strength 
up front to put the shackles on enemy 
ball carriers. "We're going to have to 
be able to throw against them to win," 
Demon Coach Sam Goodwin said. 
"Their run defense has gotten so much 
better year after year." 

Spearheading the defensive assault 
for the Bobcats is returning all-SLC 
linebacker Brad Fulks. Fulks leads 



the Bobcats with 62 tackles. 
Other defensive standouts vital to 
STSU are safety Andre Horton and 
defensive end Glenn Mangold. 

Despite the power of the STSU 
defensive front, the Bobcats are rather 
vulnerable to the passing game — an 
area where the Demons rank second 
intheSLC. The Bobcats rank last in 
the SLC in pass defense. They give up 
an average of 228 yards passing a 
game. 

Look for STSU to test the Demon 
defense with the run. The Bobcats are 
second in SLC rushing while NSU 
ranks fifth in rush defense. 

Once again, the Demons will be 
outweighed by the opponent. The most 
glaring advantage for the Bobcats is 
their size superiority in their offensive 
line as compared to the Demon defen- 
sive line. Overall, there is a 20 pound 
advantage per man favoring STSU. 
Offensively, STSU will line up in "I" 
formation and will have multiple 
defense alignments. 

The opening kickoff for this 
Homecoming game is set for 2:00 
p.m. in Turpin Stadium this Saturday 
afternoon. 



Lady 
Demons 

RUSTON— Northwestern State's 
Lady Demons snapped a five match 
losing streak and got back on the 
winning path here last night with 3-1 
victory overt the Lady Techsters. 

Northwestern won the first two 
games by scores of 15-3 and 15-2 
before Tech came back with a 15-5 
decision of its own in game three. It 
was strictly no contest after that as 
Northwestern romped to a 15-2 vic- 
tory in the final to up its record to 5-8 
for the season. 

The Lady Demons travel to 
Baton Rouge on Wednesday for a 
match with the Lady Jaguars of South- 
ern. Matchtime is at 7:30 p.m. 



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FOCUSES ON 
DIFFERENT ASPECTS 
OF NSU'S CAMPUS 
11:00P.M. KTBS 
CHANNEL 3 SHREVEPORT 
SUNDAYS 

Al RFADY PRO FII FD HAVE BEEN: 
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NSU NURSING SCHOOL 




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Time Out With Vic 

REWARD . . .REWARD. . . 
Demon Fans, 

Help! I have been kidnapped and am desperately seeking your 
assistance. After several hours of begging 

and pleading I persuaded my kidnapper to compromise . He has agreed 
to release me, however, one of you must 

first be clever enough to find me. Beginning tomorrow clues will 
be posted on the glass doors of the Student Addition in the 
Student Union. These clues will eventually lead you directly to 
me . 

Today's clue is: "Look up, look up and then you'll see. The 
Student Union is where I ' 11 be . " 

I'm counting on you, so please don't disappoint me. I must be 
rescued soon! ! ! Homecoming Week is here 

and I cannot miss our big game this Saturday against South West 
Texas State! 



Hoping to see you soon, 



Vic The Demon 



HOMECOMING WEEK 



f 88 

Simply irresitible! 

Wednesday. September 28 

R ay C h a rle s 

at Prather Coliseum 
at 8:15 p.m. 

Thursday, September 29 

Mr Homecoming Pageant at 7 p.m. 
Ventriloquist, The Barber in Seville, Door Prizes 
and more in the Student Union! 

Friday. September 30 

Parade starting at Riverbank at 5 p.m., 
and ending in the Prather Coliseum parking lot, 
Pep Rally, Bonfire, and 
Bobcat Funeral at 5:45 p.m., 
ARA Supper, Banner Contest at 6p.m., 
featuring a Live Band! 

Saturday. October 1 
"Homecoming Day! " 

Tailgate party with 
John Fred and the Playboys 
from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 
2 p.m.— Football game at Turpin: 



NSU vs. Southwest Texas! 



Homecoming f 88 T Shirts 

Go On Sale Wed. in SAB Office for $8 



PAGE 7 



CURRENT SAUCE 



SEPTEMBER 27, 1988 



SPORTS 



)emons dethrone Lions, 41-13 



v CHRIS McGEE 
ports Writer 

According to animal kingdom 
(inals, the mighty lion is labeled the 
ting of the jungle." Last Saturday 
jght in Turpin Stadium, however, the 
jjst Texas State Lions were vehe- 
mently handed their eviction notice as 
p NS U Demons took up residence as 
ings. 

With a 41-13 pasting of the Lions 
id a "move the ball at will" offensive 
tack, the Demons rendered the king 
( the jungle to the peasant of the 
(oods. 

With an eye-popping 5 17 net yards 
if the night, the Demon offense 
pened class on ETSU's defensive 
(oops, schooling the Lions in the 
pushed concepts of Retrogression 
01. After just the first quarter 
<SU had already amassed 176 yards 
lid a 14-0 lead while introducing the 
jon defense to the end zone, an ac- 
luaintance the Lions would come to 
mow quite well by game's end. 

The Demons, utilizing a Paul Fra- 
ier 10 yard run and a Scott Stoker 16 
ard scramble, marched to the Lion 
5 yard line from their own 47 in five 
(ays. Stoker then hung a pass to a 
iell-covered Al Edwards who 
latched in the ball over an ETSU 
•fender for the game's first touch- 
Dwn. 

ieith Hodnett added the extra point 
ith 9:23 left in the first quarter for a 
10 Demon lead. 

ETSU failed in three plays to pick 
p a first down on the next possession 
id punted to NSU. It was then time 
i Frazier to go to work. 

After Floyd Turner hauled in a 39 
ard strike from Stoker, Frazier 
erced the Lion's defense for 25 yards 
i2 catches and 12 yards in 2 carries 
i direct the Demons down to the 
TSU one yard line. Frazier then took 
le ball in from a yard out for the 
;ore. 

On the night, Frazier ransacked the 
ions for 122 yards on just 13 carries 
iid 2 touchdowns. This showing al- 
wed Demon Head Coach Sam 



Goodwin to keep tailback Ken 
DeWitt — recovering from a broken 
arm — out of action for one more week. 

"Paul ran the ball really great," 
Goodwin said. "I thought all of our 
tailbacks did a good job tonight" 

After shutting the Lion offense 
down once again, the Demons took 
over at their own 15. With the aid of 
a Frazier 36 yard run, NSU progressed 
downfield to ETS U' s 20 in eight plays 
before the drive stalled. The Demons 
then cashed in on the leg of Keith 
Hodnett as the senior marksman 
booted a 37 yarder to make it 17-0, 
NSU. 

Misery continued to be a faithful 
partner to ETSU after failing to bear 
fruit in their next two possessions. 
The Lions had to punt back to the 
Demons, who were ever so willing to 
take full advantage of good field posi- 
tion at the Lion 48. The Demons put 
together a scoring driveofsevenplays 
covering 48 yards which ended with 
Frazier dancing into the end zone from 
4 yards out. Hodnett tacked on the 
extra point and the Demons took a 24- 
drumming of the Lions into inter- 
mission. 

The Lions were finally able to 
penetrate the Demon defense for a 
score in the opening drive of the sec- 
ond half. After leading ETSU to two 
first-downs quarterback Mike Trigg 
threw to Ronnie Prater, who blew past 
a trio of Demon defenders for the 
score. Shane Schultz added the PAT 
with 3:16 left in the third quarter, and 
the Demons owned a 24-7 lead. 

After NSU's Dennis Smith returned 
thekickoff to the Demon 30, lightning 
struck fast and furiously. Following 
an eight yard Frazier run Stoker 
beamed a bullet-like pass to Orlan 
Lockhart, who found open terrain and 
raced 62 yards for the touchdown. 
Hodnett made true on the extra-point, 
bringing the score to 31-7 Demons. 

Two series into the fourth quarter, 
the Demon offense continued what 
appeared to be a quest for world 
domination. Gilbert Galloway and 
James McKellom teamed up, driving 



deep into Lion territory, where full- 
back Mike O'Neal ran over ETSU for 
the 14 yard score, capping a nine- 
play, 57-yard drive. Hodnett added 
the extra point and a 47-yard field 
goal a few minutes later to bring the 
Demons to a commanding 41-7 lead 
over the Lions. 

With 4:22 left in the game, ETSU's 
Johnny Hurndon took a Trigg pass, 
broke several tackles, and galloped 73 
yards into the endzone. The two-point 
conversion fell through, bringing the 
score to its final mark of 41-13, 
Demons. 

That last breakdown in the NSU 
defense was one of very few suffered 
by a squad that beat the Lions into 
submission. For the nightETSU could 
only muster 272 yards of total offense 
against the Demon defense. 

"Our defense did the job. They 
(ETSU) had a couple of big plays in 
the game, but other than that, we shut 
them down," Goodwin said. 

Scott Stoker led Demon QBs with 
172 yards passing for the game, de- 
spite a lackluster 5 for 17 perform- 
ance, which could be attributed to 
poor pass blocking by the NS U offen- 
sive line. 

After the game Goodwin said, "I 
don'tknow about our pass protection. 
I'm not sure what our completion 
percentage was, probably not great." 

A pattern which exposes the true 
potency of the Demon offensive per- 
formance against ETSU is the length 
of time for NSU's seven scoring drives. 
Five drives took under three minutes, 
and another took just 3:58. 

With his 5-5 showing in the extra 
point department, Keith Hodnett set a 
new school record for most consecu- 
tive PAT's without a miss. The old 
mark was 26 straight, set by Dennis 
Wilkinson in 1969-70. 

The Demons now move out to 2-1 
for the year with the 4 1 - 1 3 destruction 
of ETSU. Next up for NSU is a 
Homecoming showdown with South- 
west Texas State next Saturday at 
2:00 p.m. 




Plit end Al Edwards tears the ball away from 
Uons defender to score the first touchdown 
I the Demons. The Demons racked up 517 
>rdsin offense against East Texas State. 




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ATTENTION BSN 
CLASS OF 1988, 



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you can enfer acfive duty soon 
affer graduafion— withouf waiting 
for the results of your State Boards 
To qualify, you must have an overall 
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Defensive tackle Tyrone Granger clogged up 
the works for the Lions offensive drive. The 
Demon defense held the Lions offense to only 
272 yards total rushing. 



Wen's, women's track improving 



y BRUCE GROEN 
° n tributor 



The Northwestern State men's 
^ women's cross country teams 
^ntly participated in the Louisiana 
^1) cross country meet, in prepara- 
^ for the ten-team NSU Invitational 
'Monday, October 3. The Demons 
^ed seventh of 1 1 teams, while the 

Demons were fourth of seven. 

"We looked better than our last 
^t (the Demon Invitational)," 
lamented assistant men's coach 
'tis Maggio. "We showed some im- 
minent in our times. The thing 
^ut this course was that it was hilly, 
^ the course we run for the confer- 
ee meet will be ahilly one." Maggio 



was talking of the Northwestern State 
Recreation Complex, sight of the 1988 
SLC Cross Country Meet. 

Gerard Semien was the Demons' 
top finisher, placing 22nd with a time 
of 22:16, with Joe English (second, 
22:30) and Mark Spikes (26th 22:35) 
not far behind. Mark Troxler (23:04) 
and Ricky Carroll (23:55) were the 
other finishers for NSU, coming in 
32nd and 40th respectively. 
On the women's side, Vicki Robarge 
was the top NSU runner with a 12th 
place finish in 13:57 over the two mile 
course. As is usual fashion, Kate 
Christmas (14:29) was the next Lady 
Demon to cross the finish line, plac- 
ing 17th. Denise Miller (25th, 15:29), 
Kim Harris (35th, 16:46) and Mary 



Madison (38th, 17:20) also scored for 
NSU. 

"I'm somewhat disappointed in 
some of the girls," commented assis- 
tant women's coach Mark Moles- 
worth. "We are going to have to work 
harder to become more competitive. 
Right now, there are some teams that 
have no right beating us." 

NSU will host a field of ten 
teams for the NSU Invitational on 
Monday, October 3. Teams invited 
are McNeeseState, Southwestern Lou- 
isiana, Southeastern Louisiana, 
Nicholls, Grambling, Centenary, Lou- 
isiana College, Stephen F. Austin, and 
Sam Houston. The same schools will 
run in the women's meet, although 
Louisiana Tech will run in place of the 
Centenary women. 




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But the jobs you and the rest of 
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when you were in the first grade. 
Industrial development is a long-term 
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SEPTEMBER 27, 1988 • 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 8 



CAMPUS LINE 



Young Democrats 

Join the party ... the Demo- 
cratic party. Young Democrat meet- 
ings will be held on Thursdays at 1 1 
a.m.inRm.320oftheS tudent Union. 

Chartered Organizations 

All chartered organizations on 
campus must fill out a request for 
semester renewal of recognition. Fail- 
ure to file a card indicates the organi- 
zation is no longer active on campus 
and will be omitted from the univer- 
sity publications and denied use of 
facilities. Deadline for submitting the 
renewal card is Oct 1. Please return 
all cards to Rm. 214 in the Student 
Union. 

All organizations are required 
to maintain a Northwestern Post Of- 
fice Box in the organization's name. 
The only exception is to have the mail 
received at department, e.g. Asso. of 
the U.S . Army-Military Science Dept. 

All events must be placed on the 
University Master Calendar. 



Baptist Student Union 

The Baptist Student Union 
(BSU) extends an open invitation to 
all Northwestern Students to come to 
the Baptist Student Center, 810 Col- 
lege Avenue, across from Watson 
Library and to become involved in an 
organization that could make a differ- 
ence in your life. 

The following activities happen 
weekly: Monday at 6: 30 p.m. is family 
night, Tuesday at 6 p.m . is B ible S tudy, 
Wednesday from 11 a.m.-12:20p.m. 
is Noon-Encounter for all students, 
faculty, and staff for 50 cents, and 
Wednesday at 6 p.m. is Vespers, a 
mini-worship service, Thursday at 6 
p.m . m T.N.T. , a time of fun , food, and 
fellowship. 

The Northwestern BSU is sup- 
ported by the Louisiana Baptist Con- 
vention and 130 churches in DeSoto, 
Red River , Sabine, North Sabine, and 
Natchitoches associations. 
Myra Gulledge serves as the BSU 
Director. 

The 1988-89 BSU Council members 
are as follows: Milton Vining, Jr.- 



President, Christy Ackerson - Vice- 
President, Elizabeth Haywowrth - 
Social Chairman, Mel Lecompte - 
Editor, Ronnie Wise - Missions Chair- 
man, Brian Sanders - Bible Study 
Chairman, Andrd Simon - Music 
Chairman, Lee Coriel - Publicity , Lori 
Magee - International Chairman, Ken 
S tephens - L ASCO , Brad Ford - Intra- 
murals, Mr. Bert Boyd - Faculty 
Advisor, and Dr. Bradley Creed - 
Pastor Advisor. 

The Baptist Student Union is 
open Monday through Friday from 8 
a.m. until 10 p.m. and Saturdays from 
12 noon until 8 p.m. Sundays, the 
BSUis open from 1:30p.m. until 5:30 
p.m. Students are invited to use our 
facilities for cooking, relaxing, or 
studying. Brian Sanders and Milton 
Vining, Jr. serve as live-in hosts. 



FCS 

The Fellowship of Christian 
Students will be meeting every 
Wednesday from 7 p.m. til 8:30 p.m. 
in Rm. 320 of the Student Union. 
Everyone is welcome and encouraged 
to attend. 



Phi Mu 

Phi Mu is raffling a Samurai 
Jeep. Any interested persons should 
contact a Phi Mu active or provisional 
member. An amount of $5 will allow 
a person two chances at winning the 
jeep. 

The executive committee of the 
1988 fall Phi Mu pledge class are as 
follows: Kristen McMillen, president; 
JoJo Smith, vice president; Jana 
Parker, recording secretary; Ann 
Marie Schneider, treasurer; Dawn 
Coleman.panhellenic representative; 
Karen Kennedy, parliamentarian. 
Congratulations! 



College Republicans 

College Republicans ... the best 
party on campus . . . will meet every 
Thursday at 1 1 a.m . in Rm . 3 1 6 of the 
Student Union. 



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Panhellenic 

Panhellenic meetings will be 
every Thursday at 6 p.m. in the SAB 
conference room in the Student Un- 
ion. 

Wesley Foundation 

The Wesley Foundation is the 
Methodist Student Center located at 
520 College Ave. across from Alumni 
Center. Persons of any denomination 
are invited to visit The director is 
Rev. Ryan Horton and the assistant 
director/counselor is Mickie 
Townsend. 

fcveryone is welcome to go by 
and visit. The Wesley Foundation 
hours are 8 a.m.-9 p.m. on Monday- 
Thursday; 8 a.m.-5 p.m. on Friday; 
closed on Saturday and 4 p.m. -9 p.m. 
on Sunday. 

Potpourri 

The Potpourri staff meetings 
will be every Tuesday at4 p.m. in Rm. 
225 Kyser Hall. 

Le Cercle Francais 

In 1984, some members of the 
French classes wanted to form a circle, 
or club of friends, who were studying 
French. They came together, wrote a 
constitution, and got chartered as the 
first French Club at Northwestern S tate 
University. This club took part in in- 
tramurals.paintedwindowsat Christ- 
mas, and had big fundraisers and 
special banquets. 

Unlike other clubs at NSU, Le 
Cercle Francais is centered around an 
interest in the promotion of the lan- 
guage and cultures of the French- 
speaking world. Activities are fun and 
(sometimes) educational. They par- 
ticipate in festivals and other parties 
sponsored by the Council for the 
Development of French in Louisiana 
(CODOFTL), like the Festival Inter- 
national de Louisiane last Spring in 
Lafayette. Some other activities in- 
clude meetings, fundraisers, and the 
annual Renaissance Festival. 

Meetings are held once every 
two weeks, scheduled around mem- 
bers classes. Tutoring is available for 
$3 per week, or free for members. 
Semester dues are $5. 



BUAD Majors 

Jobs at the Federal Government 
Compliance Division will be avail- 
able in the Spring of 1989. Any 
interested BUAD Majors should at- 
tend the meeting on September 29, 
1988 at 11 a.m. in Room 102 of the 
Business Building. Interested parties 
are asked to bring with them a tran- 
script and resume. 

Purple Jackets 

The next Purple Jackets meet- 
ing will be Thursday, Oct. 6 at 5 p.m. 

Sigma Kappa 

The members of Sigma Kappa 
Sorority would like to congratulate 
Mary Miller on being elected Home- 
coming Queen. 

Sigma Gamma Rho 

All girls interested in forming a 
chapter of Sigma Gamma Rho on 
campus please call 357-633 lor come 
by either Room 321 E. Sabine or 1 17 
N. Sabine. 

There will be a meeting in Room 
1 17 N. Sabine on Thursday, Septem- 
ber 29 at 8:30 p.m. for all interested 
parties. 

Sigma Delta Chi 

TheNSUChapterof the Society 
of Professional Journalist/Sigma Delta 
Chi invites Journalism majors to 
explore the advantages of member- 
ship in the organization Wednesday, 
September, 28 at 7 p.m. in Room 225, 
Keyser Hall. 

The new chapter advisor, Prof. 
Leon Lindsay, a longtime member of 
Sigma Delta Chi, will discuss the 
Society's role on campus and in all 
aspects of the news media. 

Alpha Kappa Delta 

Dr. Roland N. Pippin, Advisor 
to the Honor Society of Alpha Kappa 
Delta, announces the new officers for 
1988: Betty Hoffman, President; Kerry 
Mondello, Vice President; and Mike 
Bush, Secretary, will be initiated 
Sunday, October 2, 1988, at 4 p.m. in 
the Alumni Center. A reception will 
follow. 



New NSU police chie 
excited about first yea 



By RAY MOORE 

Staff Writer 

There is a new face on campus 
this year, that of Northwestern 's 
Campus Security Police Chief Ricky 
Williams. He graduated from North- 
western in 1971 after working as a 
student officer for three years, and 
believes that his experience with 
campus security helped him to decide 
on his career choice of law enforce- 
ment 

Williams encourages any stu- 
dents interested in the field of law 
enforcement tocomebyhisoffice and 
talk with him about becoming a stu- 
dent officer. Campus security pres- 
ently employs three students who have 
been extremely busy writing parking 
tickets. 

Parking is the only real student 
problem on campus says Williams, 



'A 



but according to him, that is getting 
better every day as more student) 
realize the benefits of walking tc/ 
class. 

For the first few traffic and park.' 
ing violations Williams has been is. 
suing on-campus tickets. These tick N ' 
ets range in price from around five t c s stem 
15 dollars, whereas a state ticketgiver , k ert ' 
to repeating offenders could range ujl end a 
to 70 dollars. Williams says these on°S ram 
campus tickets give college students fi ce ^ 
break from paying large fees for viotf onai 
lations. jn. 

The only problem Williams i 
seriously concerned with is that o Th 
non-students coming on campus whEf the t 
under the influence of alcohol. Hssocial 
says he doesn't have much of a probiy, Oc 
lem with students, and is very opti 

mistic of having a great first year a- 

Northwestern's chief of police. (( j 



History . . . continued from page 1 



that were publicly active, the people 
had their fill of crusaders." Borrow- 
ing from both FDR and H. L. Mencken, 
he said "People tire quickly of ideals 
and get sick of idealism." 

During the 1920's, along with 
the 1950's, there was a "respite from 
the storms of public interest," said 
Schlesinger. "But, in the 1960's, 
desperate events gave cyclical history 
an ominous swing." He mentioned 
the assassinations of John Kennedy, 
Robert Kennedy, and Martin Luther 
King and the war in Vietnam. "The 
social fabric seemed to be unravel- 
ing." 

But with the advent of the 
1970's, the cycle turned again, bring- 
ing back private interests and conser- 
vatism. "The people were tired of 
crises in 1970— it turned into the 'Me 



A 
P 



GREEK AND ORGANIZATION 
PICTURES FOR THE POTPOURRI 
WILL BE TAKEN ON 
OCTOBER 4, 5, 6. 

If your organization is not listed on the schedule or your 
organization will not be able to meet at that time, please contact 
Jennifer Walsh in the Potpouri office at 357-5456. 



Decade,' withaculture of narcissism. 

President Ronald Reagan ' s elec 
tion boosted conservatism, said Scli 
lesinger, especially in 1 984, when "tH 
Republicans won four out of five elec 
tions." He commented on hotf H * S< 
Reagan's optimism and patriotisr# Wr 
"reached across party lines. Allclasse " II 
were encompassed: blue collar an^es L 
white collar, blacks and whites. )uisian 
However, he noted, like other consei 1 " 1311 " 
vative times, the era of Reagan "wi r Pn ze 
fade into history as the conservativ'Nedl- 
phase runs its course." He renter * 
marked that Henry Adams' concepightly 
tion of the cycle of history was nc Th' 
exactly true, because "the cyclicaP n erso 
pattern is not in the image of a pendu$ daug 
lum which returns to a fixed point, bu^s, pi 
that of a spiral which registers changestor S c 
but continues to go on." Mia is 1 

= d is fir 
is first 
Imond: 
tage frc 
ich in 
wedis! 
dersta 
itwitl 
stop 
Wl 
|meeth 
tie girl 
Sred ai 
dden p 
iyedb 
Sociat 
kite's ] 
fthe ca 
«ary A 
Af 
hris or 
fision ' 
ansider 
imed t 
aringth 
rhave 
built tl 
Wl 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4 


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5 




THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6 


4:00 


Alpha Lambda Delta 


4:00 


Phi Alpha Theta 


4:00 


Alpha Kappa Alpha 


4:05 


Anthropology Club 


4:05 


Phi Beta Lambda 


4:05 


Delta Sigma Theta 


4:10 


Beta Gamma Psi 


4:10 


Phi Eta Sigma 


4:10 


Zeta Phi Beta 


4:15 


BSU 


4:15 


Phi Kappa Phi 


4:15 


Pan-Hellenic 


4:20 


College Republicans 


4:20 


Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia 


4:25 


Alpha Phi Alpha 


4:25 


Council of Ye Revels 


4:25 


PRSSA 


4:30 


Kappa Alpha Psi 


4:30 


IEEE 


4:30 


Psi Chi 


4:40 


Phi Beta Sigma 


4:35 


International Students 


4:35 


NSU ROTC 


4:45 


IFC 


4:40 


Iota Lambda Sigma 




Demon Bataliion 


4:50 


Panhellenic 


4:45 


Kappa Omicron Phi 


4:40 


Psychology Club 


4:55 


PhiMu 


4:50 


LHEA 


4:45 


SAM 


5:05 


Sigma Kappa 


4:55 


Le Cercle Francais 


4:50 


Sigma Delta Chi 


5:15 


Sigma Sigma Sigma 


5:00 


NACUS 






5:25 


Kappa Alpha 


5:05 


NAIT 






5:35 


Kappa Sigma 


5:10 


Periaktoi 






5:45 


Sigma Tau Gamma 


5:15 


Purple Jackets 






5:55 


Tau Kappa Epsilon 


5:20 


Blue Key 






6:05 


Theta Chi 


5:25 


Wesley Foundation 






6:10 


Omega Psi Phi 



ALL PICTURES WILL BE TAKEN IN FRONT OF 
THE WATSON LIBRARY. 
PLEASE BE ON TIME. 
THE SCHEDULE WILL BE FOLLOWED AND 

RESCHEDULING WILL BE DONE AT 
THE CONVENIENCE OF THE POTPOURRI. 
MAKE SURE ALL MEMBERS OF YOUR 
ORGANIZATION ARE AWARE OF DATE, TIME AND 

PLACE OF THE PICTURE. 




chie 

yea 



OCTOBER 11, 1988 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 
OF LOUISIANA 



VOL. 77, NO. 1 1 



that is gettinj" 
more student; 
of walking tc 



Most invited to Marshall Space Flight Center 



raffic and parkf 
ns has been ia 

its. These tick] NATCHITOCHE S— North- 
i around five \f^ m State University president Dr. 
ate ticket giveiP bert A - Alost has been invited to 
could range ujl 6 ^ a planning meeting for a pilot 
> says these on^S 1 " 3111 10 be initiated. by the Marshall 
liege students;? 306 Flight Center of the National 
ge fees for vio^onautics and Space Administra- 
on. 

im Williams i 

with is that o The planning session, sponsored 
n campus whilf the Universities Space Research 
af alcohol. Hssociation, will be conducted Mon- 
nuchof aprobiy, Oct. 24, at NASA's Marshall 
d is very opti 

at first year a< 

of police. 



Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. 

According to Dr. Warren David 
Cummings, executive director of the 
Universities Space Research Asso- 
ciation, and Dr. Charles R. Chappell, 
associate director for science at 
NASA's Marshall Space Flight Cen- 
ter, the joint venture program that is 
being planned features a collabora- 
tion between the space agency and the 
university community. 

The current concept is that 



"It is first of all a love story." 

Anna Christie 
premieres 



jofnarcissismj 
IReagan'sela; 
itism, said Sell 
1984,when"tk| 
outoffiveelcc 

jnted on ho}**' SCOTT JOLLEY 
and patriotism W"' er 

ines. Allclasse " II is first of a11 a love storv >" 
blue collar and tes Laura Fine, director of the 
and whites. 'uisiana Repertory Theatre's per- 
ce other consei^ance of Anna Christie , the Pulit- 
)f Reagan "wi r Prize- winning drama by Eugene 
le conservativ'Neill. At its premiere on Saturday, 
" He re ;torjer 8, the love and emotion shined 
dams' concepightly throughout the play 



ustory was nc 



The drama concerns Chris Chris- 



"the cyclicaP nerson . a sailor who has not seen 
age of apenduS daughter Anna in sixteen years, 
fixed point,buWs, played wonderfully by Equity 
gisterschangestor Scott Edmonds, believes that 
i." una is leaving her job as governess 

— tl is finally coming to visit him. In 
is first scene, as in all later ones, 
Imonds' powerful emotions, which 
nge from joy to anger to heartbreak 
ach into the audience. While his 
wedish accent" is initially hard to 
iderstand, he quickly bypasses that 
lit with his fervor and grasp of Chris 
iristopherson's character. 

When Anna arrives in New York 
meet her father, she is not the "lovely 
tie girl" he expected. Instead she is 
iired and sick young woman with a 
dden past The character of Anna is 
ayed by Pamela White, who is the 
isociate director of the Theatre. 
Bite's performance is easily the best 
fthe cast; her portrayal of the world- 
«ary Anna is simply magnificent. 

After Anna settles down with 
hris on his coal barge, the initial 
Jision of their first meeting eases 
Misiderably as Anna grows accus- 
! med to being near the sea. It is 
"ring this time that father and daugh- 
* have a chance to mend fences and 
fruilt their relationship. 

When a ship is wrecked close to 



BER 6 



Chris' barge and the survivors are 
brought aboard, their relationship 
begins to crumble because of Anna's 
attraction to Mat Burke, the wreck's 
captain. Mat is played by Tom Wil- 
liams, who carries the role of the fei- 
sty Irish seaman almost too far, with 
his swaggering demeanor and harsh 
brogue. While the part of Mat may 
have been written as such, Williams 
takes it just over the edge, slightly 
dulling an otherwise perfect perform- 
ance. 

A week after the wreck, Mat and 
Anna admit their love for each other 
and marriage is proposed. This an- 
* nouncement sends Chris into a rage, 
since he doesn't want Anna to marry 
a sailor, much less Mat. During this 
scene, all three actors are able to show 
their talents as each character runs the 
gamut of emotions, especially when 
Anna reveals the sordid secret from 
her past. It is this revelation that brings 
each person's anger to the forefront, 
allowing for startling but splendid 
performances. 

The last act is when director 
Fine's words ring true. Love between 
all three characters is openly displayed 
as each one apologizes, kisses, and 
makes up. In the most heart-warming 
scene, Anna is redeemed in the eyes of 
Mat, Mat and Chris become friends, 
and Chris reconciles his problems with 
Anna. Finally, the three drink a toast 
to their new life. 

The Louisiana Repertory 
Theatre's production of Anna Christie 
is full of drama and love, sparkling 
with tremendous performances from 
its two main stars. This rendition is an 
excellent one, one that would do 
Eugene O'Neill proud. ^ 



*1kU Week... _^2^!111^L 



CALENDAR FOR THE WEEK OF 



OCTOBER 10-16. 19 



Oct. 10-Faculty Recital 

Children's Gymnastics- 
Cont. Ed. 

i.m. flag Football 

SGA 

Oct. 11- I'n Mot Rappaport 
Lady Demon vs. UT- 
Arlington 

Council of Dept. Heads 
Karate for Youth fc Adults 
I.M. Flag Football 
Childrens Dance Classes 
SAB 

Orientation 101 

Oct. 12-Romeo and Juliet 

Lady Demon vs. Southern 
Children's Gumnastics- 
Cont. Fd. 

I.M. Flag Football 
Sam Goodwin QB Club 

Oct. 13-Noises Off 

Karate for Youth & Adults 
I.M. Flag Football 
Racketball Class-LSMSA 
Children's Dance Classes 
renhellenic 

Oct. 14- Ann a Christie 

Lady Denton VB.-Kiss. 
State Invitational 
Children's Gyrmastics- 
Continuing Ed. 

Oct. 15-NSU vs. Nicholls St. Univ. 
Romeo and Juliet 
State Farn Reception 
Risky Business-A Day 
For Tarents 

Grad. Kan. Admission Test 



16-Homeo & Juliet 

Phyn. Ed. Alumni Party 
Nacchitochc9 Jaycces Flag 
Football courn. 



Recital Hall 

I.M. Pit Area 
I.M. & ROTC 
SGA Conf. Room 

Fine Arts Aud. 

Prather Coliseum 
Cane River Rtn. 
I.M. Pit Area 

I.M. & ROTC 
Dance Studio Rm.132 
SAB Conf. Rm. 
Fine Arts Aud. 

Fine Arts Aud. 
Prather Coliseum 

I.M. Pit Area 
I.M. & ROTC 
President's Rm. 

Fine Arts Jud. 
I.M. Tit Area 
I.M. t ROTC 
I.M. Dldg. 

Dance Studio Rm.132 3-Cpn 
SAC Conf. Rm. 5: 30-7 :30pm 

Fine Arts Aud. : 00pm 

StarJcsville , Miss. 7 : OOp" 



7 : 30pm 

3-8pn 

3-6 : 30pm 

6:30-7:30pm 

8 : 00pm 

7 : 00pm 
12-lpn 
6 -9pm 
3-6 : 30pm 
3 - 8 pro 
llam-12pn 
llar-12pn 

7 : 30pm 
7 : 00pm 

3-Bpm 
3-C: 30pm 
12-lpra 

7 : 30prc 

6-9pm 

3- 6: 30pm 

9: 30-10: ISpr. 



I.M. Pit Area 

Turpin Stadiun 
Fine Arts Aud. 
Purplo & White Rm. 



3-8pn 

7 : 00pn 
2 : 30pm 
5-0pm 



Student Unicn Lobby 3-fpn 
Keyser Rr.. 203 8 :30-l:30pm 



Flna Arcs Aud. 
Rec. Complex 
Intramural Field 



2:30 pm 
1:00-4:00 pm 
1:00-5:00 pm 



NASA will provide access to active 
data, an electronic network link, par- 
tial student support, and travel sup- 
port to faculty. The participating 
universities, most of which are not 
now heavily involved in space re- 
search, would furnish faculty research 
time, student research associates and 
a share of student support. 

Cummings and Chappell both 
said the concept for the program rests 
on the premise that there is a large 



pool of faculty and students through- 
out the nation's universities who de- 
sire to participate in space research. 
They said there is a growing opportu- 
nity for enhanced participation by the 
university community in the analysis 
of data from space missions. 

Among the many benefits of the 
joint venture program for colleges and 
universities is the opportunity for 
direct participation in space research 
by institutions without extensive re- 
source investment. 



The program will also provide 
faculty and students unique opportu- 
nities to develop research skills and 
knowledge and will encourage stu- 
dents to pursue advanced degrees in 
the physical sciences. Highly visible 
and positive publicity for the institu- 
tions involved will also result from 
the program. 



The sponsoring Universities 
Space Research Association is a pri- 



vate, non-profit, consortium of uni- 
versities. It was founded in 1969 
under the auspices of the National 
Academy of Sciences. 

USAR is chartered to provide a 
mechanism through which universi- 
ties and other research institutions may 
cooperate with one another, with the 
United States Government and with 
other organizations, both public and 
private, to further space science and 
technology. 



Guys and Gals works wonders 



By Caroline Ward 
Staff Wnter 

On the morning of Thursday, 
October6, Glen Moorman was just an 
ordinary, long-haired guy. Little did 
he know that that afternoon he would 
step into Guys and Gals hair salon and 
undergo a complete metamorphosis. 
Glen was fortunate enough to be 
chosen by members of the Current 



Sauce to receive a complete make- 
over complements of Guys and Gals. 
Since girls are usually the subjects of 
make-overs, the staff thought it would 
be interesting to alter a guy's appear- 
ance for a change. 

So, at 2 p.m., Glen stepped into 
the salon and Mary Lacour, Lorita 
Llorins, Bonnie Pace, Kathy Peavy, 
and Sue Welcock began their two and 



a half hour job. Glen received a body 
perm to the top of his hair, a manicure, 
a shave, a facial, blond highlights, a 
haircut, and a style. As is obvious by 
the photographs, these processes ef- 
fected quite a change in Glen's ap- 
pearance. 

Glen made these comments 
concerning his experience, "I had a lot 
of fun during the processes because 



the ladies are really nice, and I think 
my hair looks better now." When 
asked if he had thought about getting 
a make-over before Glen said, "I had 
been thinking about it, but I didn't 
have the money." Glen says that he 
will probably, keep his hair this way. 

The Current Sauce is planning 
to make this a reoccurring feature. 
Any unsuspecting passer-by may be 
the next target, so beware! 




Sculptor, designer to be featured in one-man show 



NATCHITOCHES— Sculptor 
and designer Jerry Daniel of Sanger, 
Texas, will be featured in a one-man 
show of sculptures October 2-21 in 
the Orville J. Hanchey Gallery in the 
A. A. Fredericks Creative andPerform- 
ing Arts Center at Northwestern State 
University. 

The three- week exhibition, fea- 
turing works selected from three of 
Daniel's latest series of sculptures, 
will open Sunday, Oct. 2, with a re- 
ception honoring the artist from 2 
p.m. to 5 p.m. in the gallery. 

The exhibit may be viewed 
Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. 
until4:30p.m. There is no admission 
charge. 

According to the artist, the works 
selected for the exhibit at Northwest- 



em represent two distinct techniques 
of working metal — the"welded-wire" 
method and the assemblage of arcs of 
steel plate. 

Daniel, who holds the master's 
degree in sculpture from New Mexico 
Highlands University, uses the term 
"welded-wire" for sculpture made 
from metal rods. 

"I first used this technique in 
1 962 and have continued to refine and 
develop it since," said Daniel. "This 
technique gives an illusion of lines in 
space, like a three-dimensional ges- 
ture drawing, to define the forms. 
Another quality of this technique is 
the show patterns which can be ef- 
fected through orchestrated lighting. 
It is a spontaneous way of working. 
The original idea transforms during 



the process and the result is never 
completely predictable." 

His "Moondancer" and "Drum- 
dancer" sculptures are two series of 
works which represent a new direc- 
tion in forms — abstractions which 
reduce the human body into calligra- 
phic brushstrokes of steel in space. 

"This simplification of the fig- 
ure to an almost stick-figure sketch is 
my interpretation of the primal com- 
monality of humanity and narrates a 
"elebration of life through rhythms of 



dance," stated the artist who works 
out of Daniel Art Studio. 

He added, "The main difference 
between the two series is subjective. 
The 'Moondancers' represent joyous 
homage to a spiritual deity, while the 
'Drumdancers' are more primitive and 
their dance is an exuberant display of 
physical experiences." 

Sculptor . . . 

continued on page 8 



The LOB is sponsoring a self-improvement 
seminar today, October 11, in the President's 
Room in the Student Union at 6:30 p.m. All 
interested ladies are welcome to attend. 



State Fair court and Mr. and Miss NSU run-offs will be held on Wednesday, Oc 
tober 12, in the Student Union Lobby from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. A valid Northwestern 
ID is required to vote. See page 4 for a complete listing of candidates. 



PAGE 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



OCTOBER 11, 198a; 



OCTO 



NEWS 



Louisiana Room worth visiting 



By DeANNA COCHRAN 
Staff Writer 

The Camm ie G. Henry Research 
Center, also known as the Louisiana 
Room, is located on the third floor of 
the Watson Library. Although there 
was a small collection of the archives 
housed in Russell, the room did not 
come into existence until the archives 
were moved to Watson. The room is 
named for Cammie G. Henry, who 
donated the large Melrose collection 
to the center. 

The Louisiana Room is an ex- 
tremely interesting place to visit. It is 
internationally known and houses over 
2,000 maps and over 400 processed 
collections. The center also contains 
books pertaining to Louisiana, rare 



books, government and state docu- 
ments, church and land records, 
manuscript collections, scrapbooks, 
family letters, diaries, oral history 
tapes, photographs, and artwork. It is 
an excellent source for researchers 
because it provides both primary and 
secondary sources. 

The center also displays some 
magnificent exhibits.There are nine 
glass cases located in the research 
area each containing archives from a 
different country. The countries are: 
Russia, Canada, Mexico, England, 
Norway, Italy, Japan, France, and 
Germany. 

The books found in the Cammie 
G. Henry Research Centerare indexed 
in the card catalog found on the first 



floor. The cards for these books have 
a special notation indicating that they 
are found in the Louisiana Room. 
Other materials, such as collections, 
are indexed on the catalog located in 
the research area of the center. The 
research center is a non-circulation 
area. No smoking, eating or drinking 
is allowed. It is staffed by Mary Lynn 
Bandriaes, archivist, and Mildred Lee, 
library paraprofessional , both of whom 
are willing to assist researchers. The 
research center is open to students, 
professors, and the public. Its hours 
are currently from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., 
Monday through Friday. Beginning 
on October 3, the center will be open 
from 5:30 p.m. to 10 in addition to the 
hours already established. 



Rhodes helps students understand 



NATCHITOCHES— Kathy 
Rhodes, counselor and supervising 
teacher at the Northwestern State 
University Middle Laboratory School, 
has been invited to present a program 
entitled "Understanding Student 
Behavior" at the Louisiana Associa- 
tion for Counseling and Development 
conference Friday, oct. 7, at the Hil- 
ton Hotel in Baton Rouge. 

Mrs. Rhodes, who has been on 
the NSU Middle Laboratory School 
staff since 1977, will speak at 10:30 
during a session which will provide 
Louisiana counselors with abrief look 
at one way of identifying and describ- 
ing misbehavior and devising strate- 
gies for change. 

She is in her second year of 
serving as chairperson of long-range 



planning for the Louisiana Associa- 
tion for Counseling and Development 

Mrs. Rhodes, who has served as 
a part-time adjunct instructor for NSU, 
was the recipient of the Outstanding 
Middle School Counselor of the Year 
Award for 1981-82 which was pre- 
sented by the Louisiana S chool Coun- 
selors Association. 

She holds three degrees from 
Northwestern — the bachelor of arts in 
upper elementary education, and the 
master of education and specialist in 
education in elementary school coun- 
seling and guidance. 

She taught mathematics for 
grades 5-8 at Clarence Elementary 
School for the Natchitoches Parish 
School Board from 1970 to 1976 
before joining the NSU Middle Labo- 
ratory School staff in 1977. 



Mrs. Rhodes «>• affiliated with 
such professional associations as the 
American Association for Counsel- 
ing and Development, American 
School Counselor Association, Lou- 
isiana Association for Counseling and 
Development, Louisiana School 
Counselor Association, Natchitoches 
Parish Federation of Teachers, Delta 
Kappa Gamma and Phi Delta Kappa. 

In recent years, she has con- 
ducted Professional Improvement 
Program (PIP) workshops on "Deal- 
ing with the Chronically Disruptive 
Student," "Making Parent Confer- 
ences Worthwhile," "Creating a Posi- 
tive Environment for Learning," 
"Discipline Techniques for the Class- 
room," "Dealing with the Non-Pro- 
ductive Student," and "Communica- 
tion Skills." 



Families enjoy NSU together 



By SHANNON J. GREER 
StaffWriter 

Northwestern State Univer- 
sity will celebrate Family Day, a spe- 
cial event for parents and family 
members of students, this Saturday, 
Oct. 15. 

Family Day is held every fall 
and is an important tradition at North- 
western. This day allows students to 
share NSU's recreation facilities with 
their families and gives parents a 
chance to get acquainted with the 
teachers and administrators in an in- 
formal atmosphere. 

A full day of fun activities is 
planned for parents and relatives of 
Northwestern students starting with a 
Scramble Golf Tournament at the 
Recreation Complex at 10 a.m. 

Registration for Family Day 
is from noon until 5 p.m. in the Stu- 
dent Union. Tickets for the football 



game and an evening meal will be 
distributed during the registration 
period. Family members will be guests 
of the university for dinner in Iberville 
Cafeteria and for the 7 p.m. football 
game against Nicholls State Univer- 
sity in Turpin Stadium. 

Parents may visit with faculty 
representatives from noon until 5 p.m. 
in the Student Union Ballroom. 
Approximately 4,000 letters explain- 
ing Family Day were mailed to par- 
ents last week including a schedule of 
events with a form for parents wishing 
to make appointments with individual 
faculty members. 

Bus tours of the campus will 
be conducted from 1 p.m. until 4 p.m. 
These tours will leave from the Stu- 
dent Union. 

A special performance of 
"Romeo and Juliet" by the Louisiana 



Repertory Theater is planned for 2:30 
p.m. at the Fine Arts Auditorium. 

Chaplin's Lake recreational 
facilities will be available for sailing 
and other boating activities from* 2 
p.m. until 5 p.m. A tailgate party from 
3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Prather 
Coliseum parking lot will feature 
Hadley Castille Cajun Band. 

A reception for parents and 
families of students will be hosted by 
President and Mrs. Robert Alost at the 
President's Home on the NSU cam- 
pus from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. 

The Family Day Meal will be 
served from 5:30 until 6:30 p.m. at 
Iberville Dining Hall. 

Students can end a fun-filled 
day with family members as they 
watch the Northwestern Demons take 
on the Nicholls State University Colo- 
nels. 



Scholar's "Renaldo" handles taboo relationships 



By SHANNON BQUFFANIE 
Staff Writer 

On Mon. Oct. 3, the Louisiana 
Scholars' College held their second 
edition of "Renaldo" a student ori- 
ented and organized talk show. The 
topic of discussion was "Interacial 
Relationships in the *80's" with host 
Reginald Williams. ] 

Guest speakers included Dr. 
Pippin from NSU's Sociology Dept., 
Dr. Breckinridge from the Psycology 



Dept., LSC student, Derrick Mitchell, 
who spoke in favor of interacial rela- 
tionships and Mike Ward (also a LSC 
student) who spoke against interacial 
relationships on the basis of peer pres- 
sure. Other guests on the show were 
Ernest Vinson and Beth Hastings, an 
interacial couple who have been dat- 
ing for three years and plan to be 
married within a month. The show 
was a real success with students gain- 
ing a new sense of respect for each 



other and a more informed view of the 
situation. 

The next show will be held on 
Mon. Oct. 17 at 7 p.m. in room 142 of 
Kyser. The topic of discussion will be 
"Religion in the Classroom." The guest 
panel has not yet been decided on. 

Host Reginald Williams says 
that, "The Renaldo shows are going 
great, and I would like to encourage 
each individual of NSU to come out 
and experience them because they are 
both informative and enjoyable." 



l tot **; 




HIOO' ttt 



IF YOU WANT TO BE 

A PHYSICIAN, 
WE'LL PAY FOR IT. 

If you're willing to invest your skills 
and knowledge as an Air Force 
medical officer, we'll invest in you 
and pay your way through medical 
school if you qualify. It's the Armed 
Forces Health Professions 
Scholarship Program. It pays for: 

* Tuition; 

* Books, supplies, equipment and 
lab fees; 

* Plus a monthly income of more 
than $650 

Call 

CAPT RANDALL JONES 
817-640-5167 COLLECT 





FOR 



IN LOUISIANA INDUSTRY AND BUSINESS 



That's what the Louisiana Investoi - 
Owriied Electric Companies help 
Louisiana graduates to be— wanted 
for permanent, well-paid jobs in 
industry and business statewide. 
j|But the fobs you and the rest of 
""• Class of '89 will be applying for 
be the product of an industrial 



development initiative that began 
when you were in the first grade. 
Industrial development ts a long-term 
undertaking. And L*uisiana'ff5eertric 
utilities are very committed to it. 

Right now, we're working on initia- 
tives that will benefit the Class of '09. 
Your kids. That is planning ahead! 




LO'JISIANAS INVESTOR OWNED 
ELECTRIC COMPANIES 



Central Louisiana Electric Company/Gulf Stales Utilities Company 
Louisiana Power & Lighl Company/New Orleans Public Service Inc 
southwestern Electric Power Company 



< 



o 
n 

> 
o 



3 
o 



DAILY DRINK SPECIALS 

MONDAY - 50 cent DRAFT All night 
TUESDAY - 70 cent Schnapps 

50 cent Kamikazees 
WEDNESDAY - LADIES NIGHT Free Bar Drinks 
10-12 

THURSDAY - $1.00 Bar Drinks 

$1.00 off Tiki Bowls 
(With Nsu Student I.D.) 
FRIDAY - $5.00 BEER BUST 
*$1.00 Bar Drinks 
(With NSU Student I.D.) 
SATURDAY - VARIOUS SPECIALS TO BE 

ANNOUNCED and 25 cent Draft 
after 12 



5 



n 
r 

w 

H 

> 




H 
S3 



Th 



Le 



LEISURE 

ond annual 
held on S; 
Over 350 i 
came out t 
sun. Sixto 
son volleyl 
ICeenan, CI 
as the vie 
canoe race 
first place. 
Duane Pat 
place win. 
boat race, 
DeBrille p 
place. In t 
contest, Tii 
Hart, and' 
chug all tl 
were give: 
event. 

Thelnti 
boree got 
(Thursday, 
teams scou 
■honing the; 
son play b 
19th. 

The 198 
teams parti 
Football. 1 
flag footba 
Sigma Sigi 
Hooperette 
the womer 
New Orlea 
ROTC, Tr 
Slaughter I 
jers, KNW 
Kappa Sig 
league. Al] 
(Epsilon, PI 
SigTauGa 
Alpha and < 
Greek leag 



Ea 



( By DeANT 
Staff Writt 
EastC 
Ithe Fine A 
jbeen renov 
and graduz 
dormitory 
Caspau wj 
office buile 



Are y 

Yo- 



By BRIA1" 
Staff Writ* 

Reme 
a kid? You 
(jacks, Ton! 
Don and Si 
favorite toj 
you everyv 
was the yo- 
Betw 
ten I must 1 
thirty of th( 
the basic tr 
the-cradle, 
nally gave 
tered junio: 
."cool." 

Now, 
comeback. 

The> 
newcampu 
joyment, pi 
tion of the 
the club, Y 
said, "Real: 
short. You 
"lent of it 
think. Thai 



— 



Tim Jo 
que, To 
man, ar 
foundir 
populai 
kill sor 

dormb; 
yo-yos. 



OCTOBER 11, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 3 




S3 

3 



The scores are in 



Leisure Activities gives IM update 



LEISURE ACTIVITIES - The sec- 
ond annual Intramural Beach Day was 
held on Saturday, September 17th. 
Over 350 students, faculty and staff 
came out to enjoy a day of fun in the 
sun. Sixteen teams entered the 3 per- 
son volleyball tournament with Todd 
fCeenan, Clay Nobin, and Brent West 
as the victors. In the one woman 
canoe race, Kim Ogletree captured 
first place. In the one man canoe race 
Duane Patin fought his way to a first 
place win. In the two person pedal 
boat race, Marilyn Levo and Henry 
DeBrille pedaled their way into first 
place. In the "ice cream" chug-a-lug 
contest, Tim Smith, Steve Hart, Mike 
Hart, and Todd Neitte were the first to 
chug all the "ice cream." Awards 
were given to the winners of each 
event. 

The Intramural Flag Football Jam- 
boree got off to a slippery start on 
Thursday, September 15, with 28 
teams scouting the competition while 
honing their own skills. Regular sea- 
son play began Monday, September 
19th. 

The 1988 season has twenty-eight 
teams participating in Intramural Flag 
Football. The teams registered to play 
flag football this season are: Sigma 
Sigma Sigma, Phi Mu, Sigma Kappa, 
Hooperettes, and Tappa Kegga Lite in 
the women's league. Nature Boys, 
New Orleans/Cresent, Bushwackers, 
ROTC, Troop One, Nuthin Fancy, 
Slaughter House Gang, Bruise Broth- 
ers, KNWD(Hard Rockers) , and 
Kappa Sigma #2 in the men's open 
league. Alpha Phi Alpha , Tau Kappa 
Epsilon, Phi Beta Sigma, Theta Chi, 
Sig Tau Gamma, Kappa Sigma, Kappa 
Alpha and Omega Psi Phi in the men's 
Greek league. 



On Tuesday, September 19th the 
following games were played: Tri 
Sigma 61 vs. Phi Mu 0; Bossier Hall 
38 vs. Bushwackers 12; Nature Boys 
44 vs. Rapides 14; Kappa Alpha 40 
vs. Phi Beta Sigma 26; Alpha Phi 
Alpha 39 vs. Omega Psi Phi 22; 
Troop One vs. Nuthin Fancy 13; 
ROTC 21 vs. Kappa Sigma #2 6. 

On September 21st: Hooperettes 
44 vs. Sigma Kappa 0; Kappa Sigma 
26 vs. Phi Beta Sigma 6; Nuthin 
Fancy 12 vs. ROTC 0; Troop One 39 
vs. KNWD 0; New Orleans/Cresent 
18 vs. Bushwackers 0; Bossier Hall 
35 vs. Rapides 

On September 22nd: Alpha Phi 
Alpha 32 vs. Theta Chi 24; Kappa 
Sigma 2 vs. TKE 0; Kappa Alpha Psi 
26 vs. Phi Beta Sigma 32; Kappa 
Alpha 48 vs. Sig Tau Gamma 6. 

On September 26th: Nature Boys 
vs. Bossier Hall 12; Phi Beta Sigma 
14 vs. Theta Chi 12; Alpha Phi Alpha 
12 vs. Kappa Alpha Psi 0; Rapides 22 
vs. New Orleans/Cresent 12; Troop 
One 20 vs. ROTC 14. 

On September 28th: Slaughter 
House 36 vs. Kappa Sigma #2 7; 
ROTC 48 vs. KNWD 0; Bushwackers 
56 vs. Rapides 2; Tappa Kegga Lite 
72 vs. Phi Mu 0; Hooperettes vs. TRI 
Sigma 6. 

On September 29th: Kappa Alpha 
34 vs. Kappa Alpha Psi 12; Nothin 
Fancy 14 vs. Slaughter House 20; 
Kappa Sigma 26 vs. Sig Tau Gamma 
0; Bruise Brothers 33 vs. Troop One 
32; Bruise Brothers 38 vs. Nothin 
Fancy 12. 

On October 3rd: Nature Boys 26 
vs. Bushwackers 20; Bossier Hall 13 
vs. New Orleans/Cresent 6; Slaughter 
House 12 vs. ROTC 8; Nuthin Fancy 



32 vs. Kappa Sigma #2 0; Alpha Phi 
Alpha 26 vs. Kappa Sigma 12; Phi 
Beta Sigma 30 vs. Sig Tau 16. 

On October 4th: Bushwackers 30 
vs. New Orleans/Cresent 12; Theta 
Chi 27 vs. Sig Tau 6; Alpha Phi Alpha 
14 vs. TKE 13; Hooperettes 32 vs. 
Tappa Kegga Lite 6; Tri Sigma 48 vs. 
Sigma Kappa 6; Slaughter House 14 
vs. Troop One 13. 

After the completion of 83 games 
the league standings are: Alpha Phi 
Alpha 6-0-0, Hooperettes 6-0-0, 
Kappa Sigma 4-1-0, Tri Sig 4-1-0, 
Kappa Alpha 4-1-0 Tappa Kegga 
Lite 4-1-0, TKE 3-2-0, Sigma Kappa 
2-3-0, Phi Beta Sigma 3-3-0, Phi Mu 

2- 3-0, Theta Chi 1-3-0, Kappa Alpha 
Psi 1-4-0, Sig Tau Gamma 1-4-1, 
Omega Psi Phi 1-2-3, 
Bossier Hall 4-0-0, Slaughter House 
5-1-0*. Nature Boys 2-1-0, Nuthin 
Fancy 4-2-0, New/Cresent 2-2-0, 
Troop One 4-2-0, Bushwackers 2-3- 
0, Bruise Brothers 3-1-1, Rapides 
0-4-0, ROTC 2-3-0, Kappa Sigma 
Wl 2-3-1, KNWD (Hard Rockers) 0- 

3- 2 

♦eligible for playoffs in Dorm League 

The playoffs will begin on Wed- 
nesday October 12th. In the women's 
league, the Hooperettes have already 
clinched a spot in the league playoffs. 
The winner of the Tri Sigma Tappa 
Kegga Lite game, will play the Hoop- 
erettes on Wednesday, October 12th. 
In the Greek League, Alpha Phi Alpha 
has already earned a birth in the league 
playoffs. It is a toss-up between Kappz 
Sigma and Kappa Alpha as to who 
will receive the second place victory. 
The Greek playoffs will be held on 
Wednesday, October 12th as well. In 
the Open League, Nuthin Fancy, Troop 



One, and the Bruise Brothers will 
playoff for the open league champi- 
onship. In the Dorm League, Bossiei 
Hall, Nature Boys, and New Orleans/ 
Cresent are still ahve in the playoff 
picture. The All Campus Champion- 
ships will be held on October 17th and 
18th on the ROTC fields. The winner 
of each league and the winner of the 
wild card playoffs will battle to see 
who will represent Northwestern in 
the State Intramural Flag Football 
Championship held November 18-19 
at McNeese in Lake Charles. 

Leisure Activities first annual put 
your money where your mouth is Flag 
Football Challenge proved to be very 
exciting. The mid-season Hag Foot- 
ball Challenge was a new concept 
developed by the Leisure Activities 
Office where each team paid one dollar 
per person to play in a single elimina- 
tion tournament with the first place 
team receiving $75 in cash and the 
second place team receiving $25. The 
Jets and Troop One are in the finals 
after 7 other teams were eliminated. 
The finals will be held Tuesday, Octo- 
ber the 11th. 

Leisure Activities upcoming events 
include: Team Tennis, a leisure ac- 
tivities minor money sport. Team shall 
consist of #1 single player, a #2 singles 
player, and a doubles team. The entry 
deadline is Monday, October 17th. 
Play will begin on Tuesday, October 
18th at the NSU Tennis Complex. 
Come get spiked in the next major 
money sport, Intramural Volleyball. 
The entry deadline for volleyball is 
Monday, October 24th. Coming soon 
to a place near you: a night filled with 
fun and games-the Leisure Activities 
First Annual All-Nighter. Stay tuned 
for more information. 



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East Caspari now housing NSU students 



By DeANNA COCHRAN 
Staff Writer 

EastCaspari, located across from 
the Fine Arts building, has recently 
Ibeen renovated to house male seniors 
and graduate students. Originally a 
dormitory built during the 1940's, 
Caspar l was later converted into an 
joffice building. 

Are voua "YO"? 



Renovations began last spring 
to change the office spaces into stu- 
dent rooms once again. These efforts 
were made to meet the overflow of 
male students from Rapides Hall. 

Several changes have been made 
in the building. Many walls were 
replaced and the rooms were rewired 
to meet student needs. Telephones 



were installed and wiring for cable ' 
television is currently being con- 
ducted. Furniture in the building has 
been refinished and new blinds have 
been placed throughout East Caspari. 

At a later da'te, the now private 
rooms may be remodeled to house 
two students per room. 



Mr. Harold Bouttd, Housing 
Director, said that the renovations will 
continue as the budget allows. He also 
said that future improvements may be 
made in the plumbing and heating of 
East Caspari. According to Boutte\ 
the rooms are up to standards and are 
looking good. 



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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15 
POST-GAME EXTRAVAGANZA 

LONG ISLAND ICED TEA $ 1 .50 & MICHELOB $ 1 
ALL NIGHT LONG 



Yo-yo f s make big comeback at NSU 



I By BRIAN McPHEARSON 
\Staff Writer 

I. *. ******* -:. 

Remember back when you were 

a kid? You had hula hoops, pop guns, 
jacks, Tonka trucks, Slinkies, Play- 
E>oh and Silly Putty. Everyone had a 
favorite toy, the one you carried with 
you everywhere, even to bed. Mine 
was the yo-yo. 

Between the ages of seven and 
ten I must have gone through at least 
thirty of those suckers. I could do all 
the basic tricks: walk-the-dog, rock- 
the-cradle, around-the-world. I fi- 
nally gave it up for Lent when I en- 
tered junior high, thinking it wasn't 
cool." 

Now, the yo-yo is making a 
comeback. 

The Yo Social' Club (YSC) is a 
new campus organization for the "en- 
joyment, preservation, and apprecia- 
tion of the yo-yo." Of the genesis of 
•he club, Yo-President Tim Johnson 
said, "Reality is too cruel and life too 
short. You have to enjoy every mo- 
ment of it and not care what others 
think. That's what we're basicall" 



trying to do here — provide an escape 
from reality while having a tittle bit of 
fun doing it." 

The YSC Constitution encom- 
passes ideals that the organization tries 
to uphold as well as the qualifications 
for membership: 

1) Our objectives for this club is 
to add a little bitof lunacy to this hard, 
cold world we live in. In layman's 
terms: "Don't worry, be happy." 

2) One does not have to know 
how to use a yo-yo to be in the club. 
We would like you to try . If you can' t, 
no problem. Fake it! 

3) If one has the desire to be a 
"yo-person" but does not have a yo- 
yo, it's okay; you are considered an 
honorary member until you can afford 
to buy a one. Once a person gets their 
own yo-yo they become a full-fledged 
member. 

4) The yo-policy toward con- 
versation topics is totally liberal. In 
other words, no matter how weird or 
bizarre the thought, it's welcome. This 
works out well because most of our 
members are either weird or bizarre. 

5) This club is open to anyone 



daring and brave enough to desire 
membership, male or female, short or 
tall, thin or fat, ugly or pretty. What- 
ever. 

Michelle Weego.the YSC's first 
female member, joined the club be- 
cause she thought that "the whole 
concept is a excellent idea. Showing 
all the tricks you can do is a great way 
of expressing your individuality." 

"It's agreatway to meet people," 
stated yo-man Thomas Burge. "That 
may sound cliche, but I really have 
made a lot of friends through the club." 

Yo-man Bill Spillman said, "It 
really helps me to relax and take my 
mind off of my troubles. Just standing 
around and yo-ing requires no worry- 
ing, which is pretty much why I enjoy 
it." 

The YSC has no real dues (ex- 
cept possibly for the $2. 1 1 for a yo-yo 
at Wal-Mart) and there is no mini- 
mum grade point average requirement 
at present. 

Unofficial meetings are held 
anytime you see a yo-person yo-yoing 
with his yo-yo. 



Tim Johnson, Damon Bour- 
que,Todd Huddle, Bill Spill- 
man, and Marvin Dorsey, all 
founding members of the 
popular new Yo Social Club, 
kill some time around the 
dorm by practicing with their 
yo-yos. 




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PAGE 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



OCTOBER 11 , 1 988 _ 



ELECTIONS 



Miss NSU run-off 

All students 

vote for one 





Cane River Belles Danceline-co- 

captain 

Phi Mu Fraternity-scholastic chair- 
man, recommendation chairman 
President's Leadership Program 
Kappa Sigma-Starduster 
Resident Assistant 
Dorm Council 

Alpha Lambda Delta-president 
Purple Jackets-vice president, Dean 
Hendricks Award 
NSU Hostess 

1986 State Fair Queen 

1987 Homecoming Queen 
Rho Chi 

National Collegiate Greek Merit 
Award 

Scholastic All-American Collegiate 

Award 
Math Lab Tutor 
Dean's List 



Current Sauce-editor, managing edi- 
tor, staff writer 

Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority-edu- 
cation director, public relations chair- 
man, music chairman, pledge review 
board, education committee, rush party 
chairman, SLU Installation Team, 
Nicholls Chapter Initiation, Outstand- 
ing Senior Award, Senior Scholastic 
Award 

Student Activities Board-Special 
Events chairman.lagniappe commit- 
tee, concert committee 
1987 State Fair Court 
Purple Jackets 
NSU Batgirls-captain 
PRSSA-secretary/treasurer 
Sigma Delta Chi 
National Collegiate Greek Merit 

Award 
Panhellenic 
Potpourri 
Dean's List 
Resident Assistant 
Desk Worker 
Dorm Council 

President's Leadership Program 
Student Ambassadors 
Education Majors Award 



State Fair Court run-off 

AH students 
vote for one 





FAMILY DAY SCHEDULE 
October 15, 198 

lOa.m Scramble Golf Tournament, 

NSU Recreation Complex 
12p.m. -5p.m Family Day Registration, 

Student Union Ballroom 
lp.m.-4p.m Meetings with Academic Department 

Heads, Faculty Representatives 

lp.m.-4p.m Campus Bus Tours 

2p.m. -5p.m Chaplin's Lake Facilities Available 

2:30p.m. -4:30p.m. ..."Romeo and Juliet" presented by 

Louisiana Repertory, Fine Arts 

Auditorium 

3:30p.m. -6:30p.m. ...Tailgating Party Featuring Hadley 

Castille Cajun Band, Prather 
Coliseum Parking Lot. 

5p.m. -6p.m Reception for Parents, Families of 

Students, Hosted by President and 
Mrs. Robert Alost, NSU President's 
Home 

5:30p.m. -6:30p.m Family Day Meal. 

Iberbille Dining Hall. 
6:30p.m Pre-Game Activities, 

Turpin Stadium 
7p.m Footbal Game, NSU vs. 

Nicholls State, Turpin Stadium 



Current Sauce 

meeting 
Tuesday 5 p.m. 



Mr. NSU run-off 

All students vote for one 



SPC 






NSU Football Team 
Student Ambassadors 
Resident Assistant 
Lead Resident Assistant 
Yell Leaders-co-captain 



NSU Football Team-linebacker, four 
year letterman 

Sigma Kappa Sorority-Dream Man, 
King Court 

1988 Mr. Homecoming 

Kappa Alpha Heavyweight Boxing 

Champion 

Student Activities Board 



Kappa Sigma Fraternity-president, 
treasurer, public relations chairman, 
Active of the Year Award 
Phi Beta Lambda-civic project chair- 
man 

BACCHUS 

Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority-Beau 
Society for the Advancement of 
Management 
Interfraternity Council 

Potpourri-sports writer 



Senators C: 

elected to 



State Fair Court 




By CHR] 
Sports W 
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SPORTS 



ors Can Nicholls learn "How 
ted to beat the NSU Demons" ? 




nford 



By CHRIS McGEE 
Sports Writer 

Someone should write one of 
those "How to" books for the Nicholls 
State Colonels football team. It would 
be a "How to Beat the Demons" book, 
and Colonel head coach Phil Greco 
probably wouldn't mind taking time 
but to peruse through the pages of 
such a monstrosity. 

You see. the last time Nicholls 
State got the best of the Demons was 
in 1979. October 27, to be exact Since 
then, it has been eight straight heart- 
aches, including last year's 31-28 gut- 
wrenching loss as NSU's Al Edwards 
hauled in a Scott Stoker pass with 
1:03 left in the game and flew 56 yards 
for the winning score. 

The Colonels will come into 
Turpin Stadium with a 4-2 mark. 
Included in that record are the last two 
weeks' victories over McNeese State, 
23-19 and Southern, 24-0. 



Lady 



Offensively, the Colonels line 
up with multiple sets. Nicholls' QB 
Bobby McDonald has thrown for 954 
yards on 78-148 passing. Wideout 
Keith Woods leads Nicholls State with 
14 receptions for 204 yards. 

The Colonel backfield looks 
healthy with Jamie Lawson and Aaron 
Ruffin. The two backs have combined 
for 793 yards and 9 touchdowns, an 
important analysis considering the 
Demons' propensity for occasional 
flaws in run defense. 

Anchoring a mammoth offen- 
sive line for the Colonels will be Reed 
Pere', a 6-2, 270 lb. tackle. 

Nicholls State enjoys the luxury 
of a blue-ribbon linebacking corps, 
headed up by Terrence Cooks and 
Richard Romero, who have notched 
58 and 54 tackles, respectively. 

"They've got a good-sized of- 
fensive line and great linebackers," 



voiced Demon head coach Sam Good- 
win. "They'll be tough, I'm glad 
we've got them here (at Turpin Sta- 
dium)." 

The Colonels, in sharp contrast 
to the big-play Demons, rely on ball 
control offensively. Nicholls averages 
345 yards per game, offensively, 
;ompared to NSU's 444. 

"They'll be similar to McNeese 
State in that they'll try to control the 
ball, not make many mistakes, except 
they'll be bigger (than McNeese). 
(Offensive lineman) Reed Pere' is a 
great one," Goodwin said. 

The Demons come in tied for 
first place in the Southland Confer- 
ence with a 2-0 SLC record. NSU, 
aiming for its sixth straight home win, 
will try to get off to a 5-1 start for the 
first time since 1980. Kickoff is set for 
7:00 p.m. this Saturday night in Tur- 
pin Stadium. 



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Demons 

By TOM WANCHO 
Contributor 

The Lady Demons, with a 7-9 
overall record, will open Southland 
Conference play against the nation- 
ally ranked Texas-Arlington Lady 
Mavs at 7:00 in Prather Coliseum. 

Head coach Rickey McCalister 
has his team playing their best ball of 
the season, after taking wins over 
Southern Mississippi (15-13,15-13, 
5-15, 15-13) and Grambling (15-11, 
12-15, 15-7, 9-15, 15-9) last week. 
Southern Mississippi had defeated 
NSU in four games earlier in the year 
in Natchitoches. 

Dawn Carlos is leading the team 
with a .168 attack percentage, while 
Colette Jones-Horton and Janice 
Graham are next with .138 and .135 
'respectively. Jones-Horton also owns 
(24 service aces, second behind Tammy 
Mros' 29. Tanya Champagne and 
Sandi Sherrill are tops in the setting 
department, Champagne has 193, 
while Sherrill, a freshman, has 151. 

After tonight's match with UTA, 
NSU will host Southern University at 
7:00 p.m. tomorrow night (Wednes- 
day), before traveling to Starksville, 
Mississippi to compete in the Missis- 
sippi State Invitational. Matches in- 
clude bouts with Southeastern, Mis- 
sissippi State and Samford. 

Smith 
honored 

by SLC 

By TOM WANCHO 
Contributor 

Kickoff return specialist Dennis 
Smith of Northwestern State has been 
named special teams player of the 
week by the Southland Conference, it 
was announced by league officials 
Monday morning. 

Smith, who returned four kicks 
for a total of 92 yards in Saturday's 
25-20 win over McNeese State, set a 
I new career record for most yards re- 
I turned via the kickoff route. With a 
total of 1,123, Smith surpassed for- 
mer record holder Roy Fontenot 
(1981-84), who returned 57 kicks for 
'.075 yards. Smith needs just eight 
"tore kickoff returns to set a new 
re turn mark. 

Smith is the second Demon in 
two weeks to be honored by the SLC. 
banker Floyd Turner was named the 
Southland's Offensive Player of the 
week last week. 



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LUNCH BUFFET 
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*Pizza * Spaghetti 
*25$ Drink Refills 
♦Salad/Desert Bar 
*7 days a week 11a.m. -2p.m. 

EXPIRES 10/18/88 

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Mon., Tues., Wed., & Thurs. 

All You Can Eat- $3.79 

No coupon needed 

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NSU Discount with ID 



Northwestern 

FOOTBALL 

Witness The Action! 



THE PLANTIFF 
Northwestern State 



THE DEFENDENT 
Northeast Louisiana 





VS. 



EXHIBIT A 

1986 - Northwestern State 17, NLU 14 
NSU's Keith Hodnett's 27-yard field goal, with no 

time on the clock, decided the case! 

EXHIBIT B 

1987 - NLU 33, Northwestern State 31 
NLU's Stan Humphries' last-second, "Hail Mary" 

pass provided the evidence to clinch the case! 

EXHIBIT C 

1988 - The Verdict ??????? 
This Year's Case Will Be Decided At The 

THE STATE FAIR CLASSIC 
"A NEW TRADITION" 

October 22, 7 pm - Independance stadium 

Get your tickets at the Field House 
$10.00 or $5.00 for NSU Faculty, Staff. & Students 
(Limit 2 with I.D.) 



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'to send flowers! 



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352-5510 



SAB Presents: 

Comedian Marty Putz 
Thursday October 13, 7:30 p.m. 
at Itza Pizza 

Tailgate Party with 
Swamp Fiddler 
Hadley J. Castille 
et Le Cajun Grass Band 
Saturday October 15, 3-6:30 p.m. 
at Prather Coliseum 



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X 



PAGE 6 



CURRENT SAUCE 







EDITORIAL 




















EDI" 



Controversy boils 

Person defends 
remarks, opinions 

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Clint Person's remarks in the Current Sauce's editorial 
pages of late have stirred a great deal of controversy. Therefore, we present his 
most current comments as a sort of a starting point for those unfamiliar with 
the controversy. ) 

Dear Editor, 

I feel the need to explain my last two Letters to the Editor. Believe it 
or not, there are some people who can't grasp the meaning of the letters. 
Therefore I find it my duty to try again. 

The letters I wrote were not my opinions NOR that of the College 
Republicans. The letters I wrote were made up of FACTS I obtained from 
the Bush and Dukakis records. They were FACT not fiction. It boggles my 
mind to think that there are COLLEGE STUDENTS who read the articles 
and think otherwise. Contrary to friendly advice, I WILL NOT back down 
from my claim that those who read it and were uncomfortable with it try to 
deny— the TRUTH HURTS ! ! ! ! ! 

All I ask is that everyone investigate each candidate and his beliefs — 
and VOTE! ! ! Stated as a public service, that the public should know, with 
malice towards none. 



Reader states views 

Legal abortion best in long run 



Clint Person 

NSU College Republicans, President 



i 



V, 



The Current Sauce'ts published weekly during the 
fall and spring semesters by the students of Northwest- 
ern State University of Louisiana. It is not associated 
with any of the University's departments and Is fi- 
nanced independently. 

The Current Sauce is based in the Office of 
Student Publications located in Kyser Hall. The office 
of the editorial staff is 225H, telephone (3 1 8) 357-5456. 
The adviser's office is 103 Kyser Hail, telephone 357- 
5213. 

Themailing addressfor the Current Sauce is P.O. 
Box 5306, NSU, Natchitoches, LA 71497. 

All correspondence, including letters to the edi- 
tor is welcome. Material submitted for consideration 
must be mailed to the above address or brought to 
the office. 

The deadline for all advertisement and copy is 3 
p.m. each Friday. Inclusion of any and all material is 
left to the discretion of the editor. 

Letters to the editor should be typed (double- 
spaced), signed and should include a telephone 
number where the writer can be reached. No anony- 
mous letters will be printed. 

Current Sauce subscription rates are $11 per 
academic year (28 issues) or $6 per semester (14 
issues). The paper is entered as second-class mail at 
Natchitoches, LA. The USPS number is 140-660. 



SONYA RIGAUD 
Editor 

MICHELLE WEEGO 
Managing Editor 

MINDYBECK BRAD BODENHEIMER SHANNON BOUFFANIE 
BETH BOWMAN DeANNA COCHRAN SHANNON J. GREER 
H. SCOTT JOLLEY LAURIE LeBLANC ELIZABETH McDAVID 
CHRIS McGEE BRIAN McPHEARSON ANNE MILLER 
CAROLINE WARD 
Staff Writers 

TIM JOHNSON RANDY JONES GLEN MOORMAN 
Photographers 



ALLEN 
EVANS 
Advertising 



EVAN TAYLOR 
Cartoonist 

SCOTT MILLS 
Advertising assistant 

DAMIAN DOMINGUE 
OLIVIA MAROMA 
Assistants to the editor 

TOM WHITEHEAD 
Adviser 



EDD LEE 
Circulation/ 
Distribution 



Dear Editor 

What Mr. Person and Ms. Dukakis both did was to argue from a 
relativistic standpoint. The truth lies beyond each of their vested inter- 
ests. Ms. Dukakis didn't actually say much. Mr. Person, in approxi- 
mately 500 words, "discussed in detail" the subjects of patriotism, 
abortion, prayer in schools, and gay/lesbian (human) rights. 

There are tomes that have been written on the above subjects and 
Mr. Person covered it all in 500 words — an accomplishment, for sure! 

Life is not so simple, thus let us take one of the above issues, 
abortion, and speak of its complexities. 

Abortion can be looked at in many different ways. One of the ways 
to approach the subject is to rely on experience. In the last 20 years the 
laws concerning abortion have changed from being illegal to being legal. 
Inherent in the change is the fact that regardless of legality, abortions 
happen. 

When I was growing up in the 1950's and 1960's abortions were 
outlawed. However, it was common knowledge that an unwanted 
pregnancy could be dealt with safely by the services of a family friend 
doctor or a weekend jaunt to New York. Both of the above options were 
contingent on one's social standing or fiscal ability. Of course, there 
were ways for the less fortunate to abort, but safety was eliminated from 
their operations. 

I was to witness one of these somber methods in the Fall of 1967, 
when I entered NSU as a freshman. I lived in Varnado and one day, as 
I was going to class, I was given an education I had not paid for. A young 
girl, who had obviously eliminated all options, had, in desperation, 
attempted a hasty abortion on herself with a wire coat-hanger in the 
privacy of her dormroom. One did not have to look close or long to see 
that not only had she eliminated an unwanted child but had, in the 
process, lost a significant amount of life blood. 

The girl survived. I learned laterthat the coat-hanger was preceded 
by the jumping and falling technique. Thus, when Ireflect on days when 
abortions were illegal, I can't help but notice that it was not the wealthy 
who were having a problem with unwanted pregnancies. This leads me 
to more aptly ask, (when considering the legality of abortion) whether 
abortion would be made a safe method for everyone or only a privilege 
of the few? The above is one way of trying to sort out the complexities 
of the issue. 

Another way to look at the issue is to suppose that a law making 
abortions illegal will deter a potential aborter, whereupon a baby will be 
born. The future mother decides either to keep the child or put it up for 
adoption. 

Let us look first at the decision to keep the child. As soon as that 
decision is made there looms the responsibility of health care for the 
mother and child during the upcoming nine months. If this is not attended 
to, the baby runs the risk of premature birth or irreparable abnormalities. 
(We assume that the iC other's prior health is good, which is not always 
the case.) Either way mo.iey is a must. The would-be mother must now 
decide whether to work during her pregnancy or rely on another to 



supporther. Some women do nothave an option: no one to support them, 
no job to begin with, present job not conducive to pregnancy, etc. Again, 
let us assume all is worked out and a healthy baby is born. From the 
moment of birth through the growing years, it is vital to the child's 
mental and physical development that good nourishment is provided. 
All the love in the world will not soothe a malnourished child, therefore 
the need becomes immediate; the good job one plans to have in the future 
is of no account. Again the mother is beset with money problems. Again 
decisions to work or not, daycare, and so on . In the end some of these 
children will grow up to live happy, full lives. Most will not The mother 
who retains her sanity through the ordeal and does not become abusive 
to herself, others or the child, will feel tormented because she realizes the 
potentiality of a child unfulfilled. The comfort will be that she did not 
break the law. So ask yourself, would not it have been more prudent to 
have allowed the mother, who understood best her situation, to make her 
decision free of the dictates of the law? Isn't there a case to be made for 
the qualitative life of a child? 

On the other hand, let us say the child is put up for adoption. That 
would be a great solution if each unwanted baby born had an immediate 
loving family to take him in. More often it turns out to be a succession 
of foster homes or an orphanage. This is due to the fact that people who 
adopt children don't want just any child. They have preferences: sex, 
age, race, physical characteristics similar to theirs, and that the child be 
healthy and normal. Hereditary traits passed from the natural parents are 
also a concern. Furthermore, owing to the fact that most adopting parents 
are of the middle or upper class (adoption is not free) , there will 
eventually be many more children than potential parents. So, what 
happens to the child who has been shuffled or unparented in adoles- 
cence? Does he/she become part of the minimum wage labor force, an 
inhabitant of a prison, or a street child? Is the emphasis on abortion ill- 
directed? Should we not, first of all, nurture the living? 

The preceding is only a murmur in the midst of many questions that 
should forerun any decision of import. However, knowing the immen- 
sity of questions to be considered, I honestly believe that the answer will 
come closer to being found if it is sought in an atmosphere of understand- 
ing, and that understanding should be willing to acknowledge our 
common bond as human beings, yet realize that each individual carries 
baggage accumulated over the years that affect the realities of how they 
live and make decisions. As long as these individual decisions do not 
accrue to the detriment of a society, I think thatfreedom of choice should 
prevail. Giving a person the freedom to choose does not denigrate 
values, it delegates responsibility. 

Thus, I only ask that in ascending the stump to proclaim the "true 
and accurate" about the issues of the day that the words uttered admit 
rational thought and that the words be those of a truth not distorted by 
personal interest For it is when reasonable thought and impartial truth 
unite that words spoken qualify as a public service. 



Charlotte Hanks 



Indivl 

Staf 



By BRAD 
Staff Writt 

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Independant sets record straight 



Dear Editor, 

After reading "Dukakis strikes out" by Clint Person in 9/27 Current 
Sauce, I was compelled to write a response. According to Person, Dukakis 
is essentially an evil person. Since Person is a Republican, I assume he 
therefore is contending that Bush is a righteous, consistent 'good guy.' I 
thought I might share some points, overlooked or purposely omitted by 
Person, which can shed some light on this "good guy" Bush. 

Person seems to want to forget the past, Bush's but not Dukakis', 
because in the past, Bush was much more sympathetic to abortion. Bush 
often criticized Reagan for Reagan's harsh anti-abortion stance when Bush 
was campaigning against Reagan in 1980 — of course Person is too young 
to have remembered such trivialities! 

Furthermore, Bush headed a Presidential commission on terrorism which 
found and pleaded that America must NEVER negotiate with terrorists — 
then Bush agreed to sell arms to Iran in trade for hostages! Does that sound 
like a real "good guy?" Bush was also the one who embraced the dictator 
Marcos on national TV and declared Marcos to be one of the great friends 
of democracy. A dictator as a friend of democracy — sounds a bit hard to 
swallow, so hard that the Philippine people kicked Marcos out for his 
oppression and robbery of their country. 

Yeah, *ole George is a real sweetheart. A man known to stick to his 
deep felt moral convictions — like his switch on abortion, his negotiating 
with terrorists, and his embracing of dictators. 

Another issue Bush preaches about is how hard he is going to be on 
drug pushers. Why does he say "going to be?" Isn't he currently Reagan's 
main man heading the drug intervention effort? Of course he is, but he does 
not want to talk about his efforts. I don't blame him! I would not want to be 
saddled with the responsibility foran effort that has failed dismally. George, 
in his current role as drug fighter, has watched as the drug problem has gotten 
worse than ever before — more addicts, more deaths, and much more drug- 
caused crime. But we are to believe that somehow, once elected, he will 
come up with "real" policies to fight drugs. I , for one, feel that fighting drugs 



is too important an issue to be trusted to a man who failed so badly at his firs 
attempt. 

Now I've just finished reading the Oct. 4th letter from Person and hi 
absurdities continue. In a letter which he says we must"further research eac 
candidate before making a decision," the points above show how total! 
inept his "research" was. 
In this letter, Person shockingly decries the furlough program in Massachu 
setts and blames Dukakis for furloughing so many criminals. In his usus 
ineptness, Person forgot to mention that the exact furlough program h 
condemns Dukakis for was one created by a Republican governor — oops 
He also cites a quote from Dukakis to the effect that Dukakis' goal is ti 
"disarm the state except for the police officers and military." Did Persoi 
hear Dukakis say this? Because I heard Dukakis in an interview on PBS sa] 
that he firmly believes in every man's right to own firearms — where is you 
research now Person? To add to his errors, Person attacks the ACLU— « 
organization which supports the equal publication of the Constitution to al 
people at all times. It is exactly the Constitution which gives every man tin 
"right to keep and bear arms." So since Person assails Dukakis and hi 
support of the ACLU, he contradicts his attack on Dukakis as being anti-gun 

In conclusion, I must say that nothing Person writes surprised me. H< 
is typical of people claiming to know it all, who then tells us "unknowingly' 
the "real" facts. Of course, these "real" facts are distorted, fabricated, an' 
incomplete because he would hate to have us be confused with the actual 
unbiased facts! ! 

P.S. Today I heard the ACLU is complaining about police freatmetf 
of anti-abortion (one of the key conservative/Bush/Person issues) demon* 
strators. Gee whiz Person, the nasty 'ole ACLU defending some of y oUi 
people — bet I won't see that written about in your next letter describing th< 
"true facts!" 



All 

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Robert Be 
SGA Sena 



Michael J. Moore 

Proud, Patriotic, and longtime registered independent. 



Anonymous response gets response 



Dear Editor, 

I am responding to last week's letter written by an anonymous student 
in regard to the College Republicans. 

Let me respond to his statements on by one, first dealing with the issue 
of prayer in school. Note the word "optional." This country was founded by 
people that had a strong belief in God, and up until the last 20 years or so this 
was considered proper behavior. Only recently has it become politically 
fashionable to oppose this idea. If you look at most functions, including 
professional ball games, professional organizations, and even our own 
Student Government Association meetings, you will note that they all begin 
with a prayer, which indicates that mainstream America hasn't changed its 
views that much. 

I agree that Dukakis' patriotism should not be questioned. I have no 
doubt that he is doing what he feels is right (or is that left?) for the country. 
Most of us (College Republicans) just disagree strongly with his political 
philosophy and ideas. 

Next the writer addressed the issue of eav rights. This is at best, a 



political hot potato. I personally do not favor gay citizens being classif' 6 
as a minority. Note that I did not say that they should be discrimina^ 
against, merely that they were not a racial or ethnic minority. Someone' 
sexual preference does not grant them the same protections given to * 
oppressed race. 

I still haven't firmly made up my mind where I stand on homosexu* 
couples adopting children. My tendency now is to say no, mostly becau* 
of the stigma that would be attached to that child by society (a society 
includes both Democrats and Republicans). Maybe in the future conditio" 
and attitudes will change, but until they do so, I must oppose this idea f°' 
what I feel, to be the good of the children. 

"Mr. Name Withheld by Request" jumps to the conclusion th» 
because one member wrote a letter expressing his views, all Colleg 1 
Republicans are "ultra conservative and narrow minded." I resent th>' 
generalization. Consider this an invitation to attend one of our meetings an' 

Bennett . . . continued on page 7 



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look at oui 

Robert Bei 
College Rc 



V 



1,1988 OCTOBER 1 1 , 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 7 



EDITORIAL 



Individuals to blame 



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distorted by 
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Staff writer points finger: 
NSU students=WIMPS? 



By BRAD BODENHEBVIER 
Staff Writer 

Are you a wimp? Are you sure? Of course no one thinks himself to 
be a wimp, but you can simply look at most people and tell — or can you? 

This holds true in the physical sense, but I' m not talking about being 
a physical wimp. No, what I'd like to talk about are mental wimps. 

Okay, let me clarify the term "mental wimp" to start off with. 
Mental wimps are not necessarily stupid or unintelligent. It has abso- 
lutely nothing to do with intelligence. For our purposes, mental wimps 
are those who cannot stand up for themselves or are intimidated by those 
who are supposed to be above themselves. 

For example, wimps won't take action when something is wrong 
with the university. They just sit there and gripe. They won't talk to an 
instructor if they think a test or a grade is unfair. 

I think this is a very widespread problem here at Northwestern one 
that has nothing to do with the administration. No one is at fault except 
tach individual student, and only the students are the losers. 

Sure, the easy thing to do would be tosit around and do nothing. To 
simply accept certain situations as fact is something that is inherent to the 
nature of many people, not only NSU students. But nothing can come of 
acquiescence. 

How can you expect things to change for the better if no one speaks 
up? I mean, why should the university make any improvements if 
students let them get away with sub-standard conditions or practices?! 

This is something that each person can correct for themselves. You 
don't have to depend on someone else to do something. YOU are the one 
who must confront that instructor. YOU are the one who must complain 
(to someone of authority, I might add) about the conditions in the 
dormitories or about the food. Believe me, they won't be changed unless 
YOU do something. 

Now, don't get me wrong. I'm not trying to incite a riot or create a 
hero. The essence of my argument is that everyone should have enough 
self-respect and mental courage to stand up for themselves and what they 
b'elieve to be right No one should be afraid to challenge "authority," for 
we are all adults, or supposed to be anyway (fire alarm bandits not 
included.) 

Not only is it acceptable to confront "authority" one-on-one, but it 
should also be encouraged. College is not only where we are educated to 
face the real world, but also where we grow in our ability to deal with 
people. No longer are we in the controlled environment of high school. 
We are all charged with protecting our own liberties, and we all have the 
right to use these liberties to bring about a change. 

There are indeed some things that are individual problems and can 
be handled one-on-one. But there are also many other things that require 
the action of the entire student body. And if I had to classify the student 
body as a whole, it would definitely be as a wimp. Next week we'll look 
at the big picture. More wimps to come. 



ght 



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AIDS education to be 
offered at Northwestern 

Dear Editor, 

In the Sept. 27 issue of the Current Sauce an editorial was run on 
the need for AIDS education at NS U. I felt it necessary to inform you that 
plans for just such a project have been in the works for quite some time 
prior to this article. I apologize for not notifying the student body sooner, 
but all arrangements were not confirmed until last week. 

The Student Government Association (SGA) has an AIDS Aware- 
ness Seminar on Tuesday, November 1st, at 7 p.m. in the Student Union 
Ballroom. The seminar will be presented by the Louisiana Department 
of Health and Human Resources and will include a film and a speaker. 
I would like to urge the various organizations on campus to pass the word 
to their members and stress the importance of becoming educated on this 
matter. According to some estimates , AIDS will become the number one 
cause of death in the United States by the mid 1990's, surpassing even 
automobile accidents 

The seminar is being sponsored by the Northwestern Student 
Government Association and is free to everyone. Anyone wishing 
additional information may contact the SGA office. 

Robert Bennett 
SGA Senator at Large 



>nse 



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Write a letter 
to the editor 



REVENGE OF THE 111 




Booksore should sell Times and Post 



Student wants mainline newspapers available 



Dear Manager, NSU Bookstore, 

Why, I will be damned if you all are not the only bookstore at an 
American university of our caliber that does not offer to its vested constitu- 
tuency the mainline newspapers of America: The New York Times and the 
Washington.Pasr, at minimum. The intellectual community of NSU expects 
you all to hold up your end of the Free Enterprise promise. Otherwise, 
before you know it, we are going to have a brigade of radical Central 
Americans sweeping up on us via Harlengen, Texas, intent on reforming our 
non-responsive Free Enterprise institutions. 

Why, if it is money you are worried about, you just listen here: there 
are, at least, one or two faculty members in each department (except 
Philosophy, which is empty), that would buy one, if not both, of the above- 
mentioned titles each day and read it Also, there would be one or two, 
perhaps three, faculty members in each department that would not read it but 
would buy a copy on the principle that they ought to. The rest of the faculty, 
finally, would buy copies because they would be ashamed not to have a copy 
conspicuously displayed (for their students) in their office. 

Why, I guarantee that within ten days every coach at NSU would have 
a copy of the Times or Post stuck in the back pocket of his shorts because 



that is just the way those boys are. Sure, they make a lot of noise about 
winning, but they know, in their heart of hearts, that the true value of the 
sport is its ability to inform the young sportsmen in their charge of those 
civic virtues consonant with this great Democracy of ours. Just ask them. 
Moreover, they will also tell you that the bedrock of democracy is education 
and a good grasp of current events so you can make informed choices and 
logical decisions. 

Finally, I know that there are a lot of students at NSU who would really 
enjoy reading a good newspaper, perhaps not as much as having a condom 
machine handy , but that, too, is evolutionary. And listen here, there are more 
of us plain, down home, gangling, gap-toothed, ugly students here at NSU 
than there are beauty queens and frat studs. You are all going to sell us a 
whole lot more newspapers than Glamour or GQ magazines because we 
know that all the beauty aids and fancy clothes are not going to help us one 
whit, in the end, anyway. 

So, why do you not cease being timid about your duty, to us and the 
grand promise of Free Enterprise? Why just take up space and only please 
the myopic? 



Stewart Hanks 



Is expressing views good or bad? 

Purposes of editorials discussed by editor 



Bennett . . . continued from page 6 

discuss your gripes. The meetings are held every Thursday at 1 1 a.m. in the 
Student Union. After attending a meeting you can criticize justly, but until 
then, don't assume conservative, lean more toward the moderate side than 
ultra-anything. 

As far as Mr. Person's comments, he does speak for a certain 
percentage of the voters. As far as I have been able to determine, the quotes 
from Governor Dukakis are accurate and have not been disputed by either 
the Dukakis campaign committee or the Democratic party. I fully support 
Mr. Person ' s right to express his views, the same as I support Mr. McHale 's 
liberal leaning comments. The fact that both of them are not afraid to get in 
front of people and speak their minds indicates a high level of civic con- 
sciousness and social, as well as political, convictions. Most of us should 
look at our own actions and see if we can say the same. 

Robert Bennett 
College Republican 



By SONYA RIGAUD 
Editor 

As most of you know, in the past year the Current Sauce has 
received a vast amount of criticism of having too much "negative" 
reporting. Many people spoke to me and other members of the staff 
about their dissatisfaction. 

I would like to take this chance to explain a few things to you 
so that you may better understand the purposes of our "negative" 
reporting and also our "positive" reporting. 

All reported material in the Current Sauce is presented to you 
in a factual and unbiased manner whether it be negative or positive. 
Any negativity is due to the subject matter of the article. 

For example, let's look at the articles on the rapes, the aban- 
doned baby and the death of a Scholar's College student. This is 
definitely a negative type of coverage. However, it was presented to 
the students in a factual manner and did not offer any biased 
remarks. 

Now, here's where the problem is! On the EDITORIAL 
pages! So many people have often said, "Okay, let's see who they 
are going to attack this week." Well, the editorial page is put in the 
newspaper for a specific reason. It is there to express various 
attitudes and opinions about certain people, places, activities, etc. 

You must remember that those attitudes and opinions repre- 
sented in LETTERS TO THE EDITOR are the opinions of the 
writers, not necessarily those of us here at the Current Sauce. An 
example would be the uproar over Clint Person's recent political 
remarks which have been printed in the Current Sauce. 

Looking on a lighter and brighter side, there are editorials, 
which I have been famous for writing in the past, that do not offend 
people, but serve a purpose as well. These are the kind all you 
complainers would like to read more of. 1 

Some positive editorials are used to inform people about 
things they may not already know about. For example, I've written 
many editorials that have told you about my myself and my lifestyle 
at home in south Louisiana. I've talked about my experiences with 
crawfishing, which is something a lot of you know nothing about. 
And I've explained Mardi Gras, — its origin and what actually 
takes place during this time. 

And I wrote an editorial entitled, "Registration woes worse at 
other NSU." Some of you have attended Northwestern all through- 
out your college career and may not have realized that it could be 
worse somewhere else. This was also to inform you about some- 



thing you knew nothing about. 

Some other editorials are used to encourage readers to do 
something. Some examples include my editorial entitled "Drag me 
out to the ballgame." This editorial was written to encourage 
students to attend Northwestern 's baseball games. I also wrote a 
couple to interest students in attending basketball games. 

Now let's get back to the negative side of things. I've learned 
that it is the job of the journalist to inform, interpret, and entertain. 
If it is necessary for him to address a controversial topic, then he 
must do so. This is why we feel it is necessary to inform you with the 
varied political views of some of the students here at Northwestern. 

Readers have the right to know the truth and it would not be 
fair to hold back anything because it is too "negative." 

There are certain articles, editorials and letters to the editor 
printed in the Current Sauce with the hope of obtaining certain re- 
actions. 

As it is said in an editorial in Press Time addressing accusa- 
tions of negativism: "We print certain articles in the hope that 
readers will gain something. If the readers gain knowledge of which 
they were previously ignorant, we have succeeded. If the readers 
are shown another side of an issue, we have succeeded. If a 
statement we make causes conversation among readers, we have 
succeeded. And if an article we print brings about change in an 
institution or practice, three cheers!" 

The editorial goes on to say the following: "It is our aim to 
show all sides of every issue we cover — to inform readers accu- 
rately—to interpret issues sincerely. We refuse to turn a deaf ear 
to local school problems. They should be exposed and ultimately 
corrected. If, in doing so, we offend our readers, we will not quit." 

The Current Sauce does not shape the image of Northwestern 
State University. It only indicates what is going on, what are some 
of the problems with the university in hope that these problems 
may be corrected, and how the students feel and react about certain 
issues. 

There are a lot of positive aspects about Northwestern. How- 
ever, this is no reason for us or the students to overlook the bad, and 
pretend it is not there. 

Amy Gender ends her editorial saying, "Society without both 
positive and negative aspects is no society at all. A newspaper which 
does not expose both the positive and negative components of its 
community is no newspaper." 

I agree with her totally. 



PAGE 8 



CURRENT SAUCE 



OCTOBER 11, 1988 





CAMPUS LINE 































Wesley Foundation 

• If you haven't visited the Wesley 
Foundation yet, you are really miss- 
ing out on some great fun and great 
people. Wesley's Monday Night 
Movies are hits. So far, they've shown 
Burglar, My Demon Lover, The Un- 
touchables, and others. Join them 
Mondays at 7:30 and find out what's 
next. 

The Tuesday luncheons have 
gone up from 500 to 750, but that's 
still a great price for a home-cooked 
meal. Lunch is served from 11:30 to 
12:30 every Tuesday. 

On Wednesday nights, Wesley 
members go down to the First United 
Methodist Church and take out their 
frustrations on the volleyball court. 
They also play basketball and roller- 
skate. 

Sunday brings time for fellow- 
ship with a chapel service at 5 fol- 
lowed by a dinner. 

Even if you just want a quiet 
place to study, Wesley's the place for 
you! Wesley's hours are 8 a.m.-9 p.m. 
Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 
Friday, and 4 p.m.-9 p.m. Sunday. 



Baptist Student Union 

The Baptist Student Union 
(BSU) extends an open invitation to 
all Northwestern Students to come to 
the Baptist Student Center, 810 Col- 
lege Avenue, across from Watson 
Library and to become involved in an 
organization that could make a differ- 
ence in your life. 

The following activities happen 
weekly: Mondayat6:30p.m.is family 
night, Tuesday at6p.m.isBibleStudy, 
Wednesday from 11 a.m.-12:20p.m. 
is Noon-Encounter for all students, 
faculty, and staff for 50 cents, and 
Wednesday at 6 p.m. is Vespers, a 
mini-worship service, Thursday at 6 
p.m. inT.N.T.,atimeof fun, food, and 
fellowship. 

The Northwestern BSU is sup- 
ported by the Louisiana Baptist Con- 
vention and 130 churches in DeSoto, 
RedRiver , Sabine, North Sabine.and 
Natchitoches associations. Myra 
Gulledge serves as the BSU Director. 

The 1988-89 BSU Council 
members are as follows: Milton 
Vining, Jr. -President, Christy Acker- 
son - Vice-President, Elizabeth 
Haywowrth - Social Chairman, Mel 
Lecompte - Editor, Ronnie Wise - 
Missions Chairman, Brian Sanders - 
Bible Study Chairman, Andre Simon 
- Music Chairman, Lee Coriel - Pub- 
licity, Lori Magee - International 
Chairman, Ken Stephens - LAS CO, 
Brad Ford - Intramurals, Mr. Bert 
Boyd - Faculty Advisor, and Dr. Bra- 
dley Creed - Pastor Advisor. 

The Baptist Student Union is 
open Monday through Friday from 8 
a.m. until 10 p.m. and Saturdays from 
12 noon until 8 p.m. Sundays, the 
BSU is open from 1:30p.m. until5:30 
p.m. Students are invited to use our 
facilities for cooking, relaxing, or 
studying. Brian Sanders and Milton 
Vining, Jr. serve as live-in hosts. 

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Young Democrats 

Join the party ... the Demo- 
cratic party. Young Democrat meet- 
ings will be held on Thursdays at 11 
a.m. in Rm. 320 of the Student Union. 



College Republicans 

College Republicans . . . the best 
party on campus . . . will meet every 
Thursday at 1 1 a.m. in Rm. 316 of the 
Student Union. 



Badminton 

A badminton course is being 
offered during the second half of the 
semester. The course is PE 1060-01N 
which will be offered Monday and 
Wednesday 3:30-6 p.m. Register at 
the Registrar's Office in Roy Hall or 
at the Health and P.E. office. 



FCS 

The Fellowship of Christian 
Students will be meeting every 
Wednesday from 7 p.m. til 8:30 p.m. 
in Rm. 320 of the Student Union. 
Everyone is welcome and encouraged 
to attend. 



Tri-Sigma 

Sigma Sigma Sigma will be 
holding a garage sale Saturday, Oct. 
15 from 7 a.m. until noon at City Bank 
near Brookshires. 

Sigmas would like to congratu- 
late Stacie Jo Klotzbach, Jennifer 
Walsh and Cindy Wilson for being 
elected to the 1988 State Fair Court 
and SonyaRigaud for being elected to 
the Miss NSU runoff. 



Sigma Delta Chi 

The NSU Chapter of the Society 
of Professional Journalists will meet 
Thursday, October 13, at 11 a.m. in 
rm. 225, Kyser Hall. 

During the first meeting they 
will elect officers, plan activities and 
welcome new members. 



Panhellenic 

Panhellenic is sponsoring a 
"Rape Prevention Seminar" in the 
President'sRoom of theStudent Union 
on Wednesday, Oct. 12 at 5 p.m. The 
seminar will be presented by J. Cum- 
mings of the Shreveport YWCARape 
Center. 



Council of Ye Revels 

Hear ye, hear ye, hear ye! Ye 
Council of Ye Revels at NSU is look- 
ing for people interested in helping to 
put on this year's NSU Renaissance 
Festival to be held this April First. 
No, it's not a joke or a spoof, but a real 
need for people who believe in magic 
and Courtly Pageantry. They need 
people who can see a simple meal as 
a wondrous feast or a fair as an en- 
chanted place. Anyone interested 
should attend meetings at 5:50 
Wednesdays in Rm. 232 of the Stu- 
dent Union. 



SAM 

The Society for the Advance- 
ment of Management will meet Tues- 
day, Oct. 18 in Rm. 102 of the Busi- 
ness Building. The speaker will be 
Scriven Taylor, a local realtor. 

New members are welcome! 



Freshmen 

The freshman class will be host- 
ing a fall dance for all freshmen from 
8 p.m. to midnighton November 16 at 
the Rec. Complex. A theme for the 
dance will be announced later. 



Repertory Audtions 

Do you want to be a part of the 
Louisiana Repertory Theatre? Audi- 
tions forThe Dickens Christmas Carol 
Show will held today in the Fine Arts 
Auditorium from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 



Potpourri 

The Potpourri staff meetings 
will be every Tuesday at 4 p.m . in Rm . 
225 Kyser Hall. 



French Tutoring 

TheNSUFrenchClub.LeCercle 
Francais, includes several members 
who are fluent in the French language. 
The club offers a tutoring program at 
S3 per week. Interested persons may 
call 352-5850 or 352-9394. 



Phi Mu 

Phi Mu is raffling a Samurai 
Jeep. Any interested persons should 
contact a Phi Mu active or provisional 
member. An amount of $5 will allow 
a person two chances at winning the 
jeep. 



Yo Social Club 

The first official meeting of th e 
Yo Social Club will be held in the 
Student Union on Wednesday, Octo- 
ber 12, at 6:00 p.m. 

All current members should at- 
tend, as well as anyone interested inf 
becoming a true "yo." Election of I 
officers will be held, as well as the es- 
tablishment of fees (HA!) and a dis- . 
cussion of the charter. 



Current Sauce 

The Current Sauce staff meet- 
ings will be every Tuesday at 5 p.m in 
Rm.225 Kyser Hall. 



Sculptor... continued 
from page 1 ByCF 

Daniel, who has done doctoral ^P orts 
studies in art at Arizona State Univer- 
sity, is a former assistant professor SaroG 
and chairman of the Art Department arounc ^ 
at Louisiana College in Pinevillei a 27-1: 
where he served on the faculty from 8 " 3, * 
1966 to 1972. sure of 

For further information on thel ^ 
exhibit, call the NSU Art Department,^? 011 
at (318) 357-4544. 



& 1 wasn't rubbing 

it in-I just wanted 
Eddie to know 
the score of 
last nights garnet 




Go ahead and gloat. You can 
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with AT&T Long Distance Service. 
Besides, your best friend Eddie 
was the one who said your team 
could never win three straight. 

So give him a call It costs a 
lot less than you think to let him 
know who's headed for the Playoffs. 
Reach out and touch someone.® 

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International Calling and the AT&T 
Card, call us at 1 800 222-0300. 



AT&T 

The right choice. 




ting of the 
eld in the 
lay, Octo- 

should at- 
tested in 
lection of 
lasthees- 
and a dis- . 



OCTOBER 25, 1988 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 
OF LOUISIANA 



VOL. 77, NO. 13 



staff meet- 
at 5p.m.in 



ued 



No more nightmares 

NSU avenges '87 game 
with State Fair victory 



By CHRIS McGEE 

ie doctoral Sports Writer 
ate Uni ver- Northwestern S tate head coach 
t professor ^ am Goodwin and his troops can strut 
tepartment 31011,1(1 more easily these days. With 
Pineville/ 27-15 pasting of Northeast Louisi- 
culty from 303 ' ^ e Demons unloaded the pres- 
sure of two gorillas from their backs, 
ion on the The State Fair Classic in Shre- 
>epartment! ve P ort was Q uickl y turning into the 
"Nightmare at the State Fair" for the 
Demons. It had been a long journey 
through the desert since the Demons 
enjoyed a victory and a cup of water in 
Shreveport. It was 1979 to be exact. 

As if that weren't enough, and by 
golly , don ' t you think it is (sorry David 
Letterman), this year's State Fair 
upponent were the NLU Indians, the 
learn that heaved a rainbow pass into 
he endzone last year against the 
)cmons to find a pot of gold in the 
lerson of Jackie Harris. The result, an 
inthinkable 33-31 comeback victory 
vhen the Demons had lead 3 1 -27 with 
me, lousy second left in the game. 

That's just fine, though, because 
ie Demons came to Shreveport and 
ik care of business in ano-nonsense 
lanner. NSU jumped out to a 27-3 
id, and the defense held target prac- 
ice on those poor Indian ball-carriers, 
t's a good thing, because the pressure 
If those two "gorillas" was beginning 
feel more like Godzilla. 



By gaining a laughable 24-3 ad- 
vantage after three quarters, the 
Demons pulled out all the stops to 
make sure that there would be no last- 
second heroics for the Indians to flour- 
ish in. 

The Demons came in as pumped as 
Hulk Hogan's biceps after a lengthy 
workout. NSU took their opening 
drive of the game and scalped the 
Indian defense, driving 74 yards in 8 
plays. Senior Mike O'Neal then took 
the honors, plunging into the endzone 
for the score from 2 yards out 

Other than the two field goals 
exchanged by the two teams in the 
second quarter, there was no other 
offensive action for the remainder of 
the half. But oh brother, was there 
action from the NSU defense! 

With all the dexterity of a heat- 
seekingmissile.theDemonsemployed 
a pass rush that honed in on NLU 
quarterback Doug Pederson for the 
duration of the first-half while the 
NSU secondary and linebacking corps 
did their best imitation of the NFL's 
videocassette "Crunch Course." 
The NSU defense plummeted the 
Indian running game in the first-half, 
holding NLU to a (get this!) micro- 
scopic minus 5 yards rushing for the 
first 30 minutes. 

Once again the Demons showed 
their partiality to the third quarter, not 



to mention their dominance of the 
Indians for most of the game. With a 
10-3 lead coming into the second- 
half, NSU exploded for two touch- 
downs in the third quarter, seemingly 
putting the game in moth balls, 24-3. 

Kenneth DeWitt took the opening 
second-half kickoff at his own 14 and 
galloped 55 yards downfield to the 
NLU 31. Two plays later Demond 
tailback Paul Frazier found a hole and 
raced 20 yards for the score. Keith 
Hodnett added the PAT, and the 
Demons lead 17-3. 

All things considered, the Demons 
remained their intensity on their next 
possession. Utilizing a nifty 34 yard 
pass from Mark Mayfield to tight end 
Orlan Lockhart, the Demons moved 
down to the NLU 33. Demon quarter- 
back Scott Stoker, reading an Indian 
blitz, unloaded a 33 yard scoring strike 
to Mayfield, increasing the lead to 24- 
3. 

"I couldn't see that much because 
a linebacker was in my face," said 
Stokerof the pass. "I actually thought 
somebody was on him. Ididn'tknow 
we scored until I heard the crowd 
roar." 

It looked as if the Demons would 
punch it into the endzone one more 
time in the fourth quarter when May- 
field and Floyd Turner caught passes 
covering 14, 10, and 27 yards. The 




Bringing down yet another Northeast Indian, Northwestern State Demons Brian Guidry, 
Frank Hornsby (#62), and Henri Wesley (#85) display the teamwork which resulted in a 27- 
15 win over NLU at the 1988 State Fair Classic held at Shreveport 's Independance Stadium. 
This was the first year for NSU to play Northeast at the State Fair. 

Demons marched 75 yards in 1 3 plays 
on the time-consuming drive before 
things stalled. Hodnett came on and 
booted a 20 yard field goal to up the 
score to 27-3 Demons. 



The Demons then relaxed. Maybe 
a little too much. NSU kept the ball on 
the ground mostly, and defensively, 
went into a prevent zone coverage. 
Prevent is right. It prevented the 



Demons from holding onto their siz- 
able lead. 

The Indians took advantage of the 
Demon prevent defense and came up 
with two quick fourth quarter touch- 
downs, slicing the margin to 27-15 as 
a couple of two-point conversions 
failed to materialize. But the Demons 
held Northeast on a last-ditch, fourth 
down try and took over possession, 



running out the final seconds remain- 
ing on the clock. 

"We've been so good in the third 
quarter," said Goodwin. "It was just 
bam, bam, and we were up. Then in 
the fourth quarter we hang on by a 
thread." 

State Fair,., 
continued to page 5 



Alley rally brings out 
Northwestern spirit 



ly KAREN ENGERON 
'taffWriter 

The recipe for a high-spirited 
tally in the Alley ? 
300-400-scholastically 
acclaimed Northwestern 
students 
300-400~average Northeast 
students 
10- women to make up a 

wonderfulNSUStateFairCourt 
10-girls slapped together 
to make a NLU S tate Fair Court 
1 -fantastic rock androll 
band named "The Boomers" 
1 -group of awesome NSU 
yell leaders, and of course, 
Vic the Demon 
1 -group of unprofessional 
NLU cheerleaders, and a 
goofy-looking Indian 
Make sure you add plenty of fun 
id drinking. All of this and you have 
ne lively Rally in the Alley. 

Last Saturday afternoon Rally 
11 the Alley was presented by North- 
ast. Activities began at 12:30. "The 
'oomers" played from 12:30 to 1:30, 
tod again from 2:30 to 5:30. 

At 1:00, the NSU yell leaders 
tod the NLU cheerleaders performed 
arious cheers for the crowd. This 
e came somewhat a competition in 
^elf, with NSU winning, of course. 

Presentation of the courts took 
''ace. Northwestern State Fair Court 
Ambers were Kim Browning, a 
°phomore from Natchitoches; Dayna 
wley, a junior from Baton Rouge; 
e th Eitel, a junior from Natehito- 
tas; Staci Jo Klotzbach, a freshman 
0rr < Shreveport; Lisa Lukowski, a 
^Phomore from Lutcher; Holly 
lethvin, a sophomore from Texas; 
r acy Smith, a sophomore from 
Berlin; Jennifer Walsh, a sophomore 
Baton Rouge; and Cindy Wilson, 
sophomore from Haughton. The 
9 88 NS U S tate Fair Queen was Ann 
•arie Schneider, a sophomore from 
halmette. 

Afterwards, numerous contests 



took place. Competitions included a 
banner contest, a tricycle relay, and a 

shoe race. The banner contest was 
won by the Phi Mu's from NSU. 

A tricycle relay took place next 
Four people ride a tricycle to a desig- 
nated point, drink a beer, and come 
back to give the tricycle to the next 
team member. First place went to two 
Kappa Sigmas from Centenary and 
two NSU Kappa Sigmas, Todd 
Keenan, a senior from Natchitoches; 
and Ken Gardener, a sophomore from 
Opelousas to make up the four man 
relay team. Their prize was a big tro- 
phy. 

Second place went to four NSU 
Kappa Sigs. That team was composed 
of Dennis Allison, a junior from 
Natchitoches; Richard Gizzie, afresh- 
man from Massachusetts; Trey 
McMillian, a freshman from Vivian, 
and Jeff Neely, a freshman from New 
Rhodes. They won a $20 bar tab to 
Ragtime and a $20 bar tab to the 
Seven Sisters. 

The shoe race was won by NSU 
Kappa Sigma Ken Gardener. He had 
to put his shoes in a pile that were 
mixed up with every other participant's 
shoes. He then had to run a certain 
distance, find his shoes, put them on, 
drink a beer, and go back to the start- 
ing position. Gardener's prize was a 
trophy. 

NSU's State Fair Chairman, 
Laura Willis, said,"Northwestern had 
a great representation at Rally in the 
Alley. Being that NLU is new to the 
events, they seemed somewhat un- 
aware of what to do." 

Brett Harris, a senior from 
Natchitoches who participated in the 
festivities said, "NLU didn't know 
what to do. They were walking around 
with puzzled looks on their face. NSU 
didn't mind, we just kept on partying 
down." 

NSU yell leader, Randy Crow 
said, "It was a lot of fun. The NSU 
fans were very supportive. We showed 
Northeast who had the most spirit !" 




The Alley was packed with hundreds of NLU and 
NSU fans ready to cheer on their teams. 




Celebrating their win at Rally in the Alley, Kappa 
Sigmas Alan Heil, Don Forrest, Allan Evans, and 
Marshall Carll toast their victory. 



Thrills, chills available at 
campus Halloween haunts 



By ANNE MILLER 
Staff Writer 

Halloween is nearly upon 
Northwestern students once again 
and many will begin to wonder 
how to celebrate the holiday while 
away from home. 

Billiards, a bar which is lo- 
cated across from University Ex- 
press, is planning abeer bust forthe 
night of the 31st. They are also 
having a costume contest with 
separate divisions for men and 
women. A $25 bar tab will be 
awarded to winners from each 
division. 

Sassy's, aclub located within 
the Holiday Inn, is also planning a 
costume contest on Halloween 
night. A$50bartabwillbeawarded 
to the winner, with a $25 bar tab 
going to 2nd place and a $15 bar 
tab going to 3rd place. Everyone 
who enters the club in costume will 
recieve their first bar drink free. 

The Student Body and Boda- 
cious Country will not be open 
Halloween night. 

The Student Activites Board 
will be showing the movie Angel 
Heart. 

The Scholars' College Stu- 
dent Life Enrichment Committee 
is planning a haunted house. This 
will take place on the night of Fri- 
day the 28 th through Monday the 
3 1 st. It will begin on the front steps 
of Russell Hall and will run from 
8:00 p.m. to midnight It will be 50 
cents per person. 



The Greek community will 
also be very active for the Hallow- 
een festivities. The Gamma Psi 
Chapterof Kappa Alpha Order will 
hold its annual Halloween party on 
Monday, October 3 1 , at theKappa 
Alpha Mansion. This year's theme 
will be Gamma Psicho. 

The Kappa Sigma's 2nd 
annual Halloween Dance will be 
held on the night of the 3 1st at the 
National Guard Armory. This 
year's theme is Monster Bash 2, 
The Return of the Living Keg. All 
Kappa Sigmas and their dates are 
invited. 

Phi Mu will have a Hallow- 
een exchange with ThetaChi on the 
night of the 3 1 st. It will be held at 
the Theta Ch i House on Greek Hill. 
The theme for their exchange is 
Eat, Drink and be Scary. 

Sigma Sigma Sigma will hold 
its annual Harvest Dance on Friday 
the 28th. The theme for this year's 
dance is Old McDonald had a Party, 
Sigma Sigma Sigma. It will be held 
at the National Guard Armory. All 
Tri-Sigmas and their dates are 
invited. 

Sigma Kappa will have an 
exchange with Tau Kappa Epsilon 
on the night of the 27th. It will have 
a Halloween theme and be held at 
the Tau Kappa Epsilon House on 
Greek Hill. 

If none of the previously men- 
tioned activities appeal to you, do 
not forget the old standby: go trick- 
or-treating! Happy Halloween. 




1988 State Fair Court, 
from left: Dayna Dooley, 
Holley Methvin, Staci Jo 
Klotzbach, Jennifer 
Walsh, Lisa Lukowski, 
Queen Ann Marie Sch- 
neider, Beth Eitel, Cindy 
Wilson, Tracy Smith, 
and Kim Browning. 



PAGE 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



OCTOBER 25, 1988 



NEWS 





























NSU honors leading students 



NORTHWESTERN— Sixty 
outstanding high school students from 
30 regional high schools and their 
parents have been invited to attend 
Leadership excellence Day II, Octo- 
ber 29, at Northwestern State Univer- 
sity. The purpose of this prestigious 
event is to foster leadership excel- 
lence among those students and to 
familiarize them with NSU and its 
Army ROTC program. 

The invited students were se- 
lected based on criteria including a 
minimum cumulative grade point 
average of 3.5 (on a 4.0 scale) and a 
minimum combined ACT score of 24. 
Nominations were submitted by the 
high school principals. 

The day will begin with regis- 
tration at the A.A. Fredericks Fine 
Arts Center followed by welcoming 
remarks from Dr. Bobby Alost, NSU 
President, Mrs. Georgia Beasley, NSU 
Director of Admissions and LTC 



Royal Brown, Head, Department of 
Military Science. The students will 
then be divided into three groups and 
participate in an outdoor leadership 
reaction course in which each group 
must solve a problem using sparse 
materials available within a 7 minute 
time frame. An example includes 
constructing a tripod given 4 boards 
only 2 of which are connected. 

Following the leadership reac- 
tion course tlie students will then move 
indoors where they will be presented 
a problem involving a hypothetical 
school devastated by the loss of the 
two top members of its student gov- 
ernment in an accident. They must 
develop a plan of action which re- 
quires them to form a new govern- 
ment and work together on a solution. 
While this is occurring, their parents 
will be given a bus tour of Natchito- 
ches by Mrs. Betty Jones, Executive 
Director of the Natchitoches Cham- 



ber of Commerce. 

Parents and students will be 
reunited at 4 p.m. for the presentatior. 
of each group's solution to the prob- 
lem posed. Upon completion, the 
students will be given a short evalu- 
ation of their performance and pre- 
sented an NSU ROTC T-shirt The 
group will then be given a tour of the 
NSU campus by Purple Jackets host- 
esses. The students, their families and 
members of the NSU Army ROTC 
Department will then have dinner 
together at Iberville Dining Hall. Those 
who desire to stay will be presented 
complimentary passes to the NSU 
football game with Sam Houston State. 

Last year eight outstanding high 
school students came to NSU as a 
direct result of the influence of this 
event. It is hoped that Leadership 
Excellence Day II will result in an- 
other successful turnout and at least 
ten quality freshmen for NSU. 



Middle- week celebration 

LAD plans Half-Niter 



INTRAMURALS— The Lei- 
sure Activities Department invites all 
students, faculty, and staff to come 
celebrate the end of "Hump Day" and 
the beginning of "So Happy It's Thurs- 
day" at their first annual Half-Niter on 
Wednesday, November 2, from 8p.m. 
until. 

The celebration will take place 
at the Intramural Building. The night 
will offer something for everyone — 
fun, games, hot dogs, music, marsh- 
mallow roasts, prizes, favors, bever- 
ages, treasure hunts, and much, much 
more. 

The evening will begin with a 
hot dog and marshmallow roast which 



is free to all NSU students, faculty, 
and staff. As evening turns into night, 
the games will begin, which includes 
scooter board races, grass sack relays, 
baby bottle chug, backward free throw 
contests, "Win, Lose, or Draw" com- 
petition, tennis ball pass, and a food 
eating contest Form your teams 
now — teams must consist of five 
members, male or female as long as 
both genders are represented. Teams 
may enter by stopping by the Intramu- 
ral Building or calling 357-5461 or 
357-5462. 

As the midnight hour ap- 
proaches, everyone will be given the 
opportunity to find the hidden treas- 



ure from the clues they will receive 
throughout the night. As night turns 
into day, some lucky treasure hunt 
winner will have a "So Happy It's 
Thursday" day. 

We know you are "anxious" to 
get started with your hunt, that why 
we decided to make this clue very 
simple and blunt Don't rely on your 
eyes to be the only "key;" after all, it 
is easy as A, B, C, 1, 2, 3. 

Additional clues to be given on 
the radio stations KNWD, KZBL, and 
KNOC starting Monday, October 31. 
Make plans to attend this annual Lei- 
sure Activities Event 



$chool $upllie$ 
Clearance $ale 



Uhite and green 
Reg. 70* 



ega I " pad3 8 1 /2 x H 
NOU 35$ 



NSU Ballpoint pens Black ink only 
Reg. 29<t NOU 10* 

Storage Boxes (home and office use) 
Reg. $1.05 NOU. $2.49 
Reg . $5.15 NOU $3.15 
Reg. $8.50 NOU $4.99 

Reg. ..$10.80 NOU $6.49 

Prices Good October 25-31 

-University Bookstore- 




^ Leisure, 




NITER 



On Wednesday, November 2nd, Leisure Activities will explode with its 
"First Annual Half Niter". The fuse will be lit by the flame from 
roasting hotdogs and toasting marshmellows. The nite will erupt with 
an evening of games and prizes, overflowing with excitement into a 
treasure hunt. The explosion will occur on WEDNESDAY, NOVEM- 
BER 2nd, from 8pm UNTIL MIDNIGHT at the Intramural Building. 
The catalyst for this powerful explosion is your team. Teams shall 
consisit of 5 people and can be any combination of male/female 
members as long as both genders are represented. 'ft 



EVENTS ARE AS FOLLOWS 



Grass Sack Relay: Team Event 

each memeber shall hop one length of the gym 

Backward Free Throw: Team Event 

Each member shoot two backwards free throws 

Tennis Ball Pass: Team Event 

Food Eating Contest: Team Event 

pach member will eat a food item 



Scooter Board Races: Team Event 
5 person medley relay 

Baby Bottle Coke Chug: Individual Event 
team points will be awarded 

Win, Lose, or Draw: Team Event 
single elimination tournament 

Treasure Hunt: Clues will be given 
every 30 minutes . 



ROTC to compete 



NORTHWESTERN— North- 
western State University's Army 
ROTC Ranger Challenge Team-the 
Swamp Demons, will compete against 
the team from McNeese State Univer- 
sity on 29 October in Lake Charles. 

Ranger Challenge is the Varsity 
Sport of the U.S. Army's Cadet 
Command, Sr. ROTC program and is 
a rugged, demanding team sport 
composed of six challenging events. 
The events include construction of a 
one rope bridge; hand grenade assault 
course; a physical fitness test; a gruel- 
ing 10 kilometer road march with all 
equipment; marksmanship competi- 
tion using M16 rifles; weapons as- 
sembly and an orienteering course. 

The 11-man Swamp Demon 
Team is led by Cadet Major Valerie 
Clay, a senior Business major at NSU. 
The coach is sergeant Major Fred 
Harmon of the ROTC Department. 
Both expect the team to compete with 
honor whether they win the overall 
competition or not. 

Other regional competition for 
the Swamp Demons is planned with 
LSU-Shreveport in November and 
Northeast University of LA in Jan. or 



Feb. The team will travel to Camp 
Robinson, Arkansas 4-6 March 1989 
to compete with 16 other teams from 
colleges in Louisiana and Arkansas. 
The winner of this competition will 
compete in regional competition in- 
volving teams from seven states and 
Puerto Rico. . 



RESEARCH PAPERS 

16^78 to choose from— all subjects 

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That's what the Louisiana Investor- 
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Louisiana graduates to be— wanted 
for permanent, well-paid jobs in 
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Tut the jobs you and the rest of 
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ty be the product of an industrial 



development initiative that began 
when you were is the first grade. 
Industrial development is a long-term 
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Right now. we're working on initia- 
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10/31/881 



OCTOBER 25, 1988 


CURRENT SAUCE 


PAGE 3 




EDITORIAL 




fl j 



Eighteen= carding and votin g 

Age carries privileges 
and responsibilties 

By BRAD BODENHEIMER 
Staff Writer 

Remember when you turned 18 and you couldn't wait to 
go to a bar and have someone card you? Didn't you get upset 
when they didn't or didn't you feel proud when they did? I 
mean, you were finally of legal age and you wanted to take full 
advantage of it. 

Well, there's something else you get to do when you turn 
18. That's right, you get to vote. Now, I don't know how many 
of you have voted before, but I'm not too sure many of you 
have voted in a presidential election. It's a pretty exciting 
feeling the first time you vote, maybe because it's another 
privilege to make you feel like an independent adult. 

I think I may have used an inappropriate word, though, 
to describe voting. Voting is not simply a privilege but a re- 
sponsibility. There are people in other countries who are 
dying to bring about free elections. Think about the Ameri- 
cans who died to preserve our freedom, including our right to 
vote. And if you're black, think about how hard your grand- 
parents had to struggle and how long they had to wait in order 
to gain the right to vote. 

It's true that this presidential year, many people contend 
that there really isn't a strong candidate to vote for, so why 
vote at all? But each individual must educate themselves 
about each candidate and what he stands for. Then you will be 
able to better decide who to vote for or if you should even vote 
at all. 

Now, if you decide you're going to vote, be forewarned 
that election day is Tuesday, November 8. Remember, you 
must vote in the district in which you're registered. So if you 
live out of town, you cannot vote here in Natchitoches. Some 
people live close enough where they can make the trip home on 
a school day in order to vote. But some students cannot drive 
or fly hundreds of miles and miss a day or two of classes just 
to vote. 

There is an alternative, however. If you live too far away 
to vote on Election Day, you can absentee vote. Absentee 
voting begins this Thursday, October 27. That means you 
have one weekend before the election to go home and visit the 
office of the Registrar and vote on the spot. But if you still can't 
make it home, you can contact the State Democratic or Repub- 
lican Party headquarters, who will send you an absentee ballot 
that you can mail in. Also, your local registrar will send you 
a ballot upon "written request. Absentee voting ends on 
November 1, so act now. 

This promises to be a very close election where every 
single vote will count, similar to the election that was won by 
just one vote per precinct. Don't let that be your vote that's 
missing. Remember, if you are not registered in Natchitoches, 
you cannot vote in Natchitoches. So take whatever steps are 
necessary and make an educated choice. 



lofr>cfVf 



Thought 



I Wouut> Get The "Dan Off 
Because We Won* StMe tmrJ 
Nou Koowj Trie Llbftf^M M4t> 

Tc&.t Off tee Shut "Db^m . . . 




The Current Sauce staff 
would like to 
wish everyone a 

Happy and Safe 

Halloween! 




Students have last chance 

By SONYA RIGAUD 
Editor 

Where has all the spirit gone? Why is the crowd so sparse? 

In the past, you would have expected poor participation at 
Northwestern basketball games or baseball games . . . but football 
games!? 

What is happening? Why aren't the students of Northwest- 
ern and the people of Natchitoches supporting the Demons who 
just so happen to have a 6-1 record.. .yes, 6-1. To me, that's really 
great and we should be out there supporting all their hard work 
and dedication. 

After all, look what we did this past weekend! We beat the 
HELL out of Northeast! Those of us who attended the State Fair 
Classic had a great time, but I know that going to Shreveport and 
spending all that money wasn't exactly what a lot of you could 
afford to do. 

Well, this weekend is our last home football game and you 
should ALL be out there cheering on the Demons. After all, it is 

free. 

You have to admit, a football game is usually the social event 
of the season. I've always had lots of fun at the games with my 
friends even though football is a foreign subject to me. 

But you say it's not fun anymore. Why not? Could it be that 
every time you stand up to cheer those good ole Demons on, a 
policeman makes you sit down and shut up? 

Who wants to sit still when our team makes a good play? 
Why must we limit our spirit, which in turn, dims the spirit of the 
players? 

Maybe there are other reasons for the great amount of 
absences and lack of participation at Northwesterr's football 
games. But I personally feel that these restrictions which are 
being set on us may have a big effect on the lack of enthusiasm in 
attending them. 

In any case, I've been told that the students of Northwestern 
and the people of Natchitoches don't deserve to have a winning 
team. 

Can somebody up there tell us why not? 



— — — _ 



Current Quotes 

Who are you voting for in the upcoming 
presidential election and why? 





Anita Bryant 
Accounting 
Sophomore, Verda 

"/ am voting for Bush be- 
cause I believe he will represent and 
help the people. I do not agree with 
Dukakis' views on many matters and 
feel that he would be a bad choice for 
president." 



Yulanda EHerbee 
Physical Therapy 
Freshman, Leesville 

"I believe that George Bush 
is the best man for the presidency 
because he represents the American 
people much better that Dukakis." 



Current Sauce 



The Current Sauce's published weekly during the 
Tall and spring $emestersby the students of Northwest- 
ern State University of Louisiana, tt is not associated 
with any of the University's departments and is fi- 
nanced independently. 

I The Current Sauce is based ri the Office of 
Student Publications located in Kyser Halt, The office 
of the editorial staff is 225H. telephone (318) 357-5466. 
The adviser's office is 103 Kyser Hall, telephone 357- 

5213. 

The mailing address for the Current Sauce\s P.O. 
Box 5306, NSU, Natchitoches, LA 71497. 

All correspondence, including letters to the edi- 
tor is welcome. Materia! submitted for consideration 
must be mailed to the above address or brought to 

the office. 

The deadline for all advertisement and copy is 3 
p.m. each Friday. Inclusion of any and all material Is 
(eft to the discretion of the editor. 

Letters to the editor should be typed (double- 
spaced), signed and should include a telephone 
number where the writer can be reached. No anony- 
mous letters will be printed. 

Current Sauce subscription rates are $ 1 1 per 
academic year (28 issues) or $6 per semester (14 
issues). The paper Is entered as second-class mail at 
Natchitoches. LA. The USPS number is 140-660. 



SONYA RIGAUD 
Editor 

MICHELLEWEEGO 
M anaging Editor 

MINDYBECK BRAD BODENHEIMER SHANNON BOUFFANIE 
BETH BOWMAN DeANNA COCHRAN SHANNON J. GREER 
H. SCOTT JOLLEY LAURIE LeBLANC ELIZABETH McDAVID 
CHRIS McGEE BRIAN McPHEARS ON ANNE MILLER 
CAROLINE WARD 
Staff Writers 

TIM JOHNSON RANDY JONES 
GLEN MOORMAN ROBERT ROUGEAU 
Photographers 



ALLEN 
EVANS 
Advertising 



EVAN TAYLOR 
Cartoonist 

SCOTT MILLS 
Advertising assistant 

DAMIAN DOMING L'E 
OLIVIA MAROMA 
Assistants to the editor 

TOMWHITEHEAD 

Adviser 



EDD LEE 
Circulation/ 
Distribution 



Fall '88 





John Fontenot 
Criminal Justice 
Freshman, St. Rose 

"I'm for Duke because he 
seems to be the type of president that 
won't tell us he forgot about some- 
thing he did." 



Kenny Hemmer 
Public Relations 
Freshman, New Iberia 

"/ am for Duke because I feel 
we need a change and he can give us 
that change." 





Lottie Holmes 
Scholars' College 
Sophomore, Natchitoches 

"I'm dissappointed that we 
have twinkies for candidates. I'd like 
to see a decent person run for presi- 
dent-like Dr. Alost. He's definitely 
NOT a twinkie." 



Dennis M. Smith 
Criminal Justice 
Freshman 

"I'm totally for Duke because 
of his views on the poor." 



i 



9 



PAGE 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



OCTOBER 25, 1988 



NEWS 



Intramurals flag football results 



INTRAMURALS — More than 
500 spectators watched 3 days of intra- 
mural flag football playoffs as the 
1988 season ended last week in dra- 
matic style. Four teams battled in a 
wildcard playoff for the one remain- 
ing slot in the all campus football 
championships. 

Bossier Hall, unbeaten in regu- 
lar season play, but losing in the dorm 
championship game to the Nature 
Boys, faced Alpha Phi Alpha, a Greek 
team also unbeaten in regular season 
play and also losing in the Greek 
championship game to Kappa Alpha, 
played a tense first round game which 
saw Bossier Hall top Alpha Phi Alpha 
19-14. Alpha Phi Alpha, 1987 Greek 
and all campus champions ended theii 
bid to repeat in 1988. 

Bruise brothers and Troop One : 
both tying Nuthin Fancy for the Open 
League regular season title with 4-2 
records, lost to the Fancy Folks in that 
leagues playoffs, draw each other to 
play in the other wildcard game. Troop 
One, winner of this years football 
challenge, outclassed the Bruise 
Brothers 26-6 to earn a spot in the 
wildcard finals against Bossier Hall. 
Bossier, led by quarterback Jeff How- 
ard and receivers Dewey Granger, 
Vince Tartamella and Mickey Rober- 
son, jumped out to a 26-0 lead and 
then put away the Proud Troops 33-18 
to earn the final spot in the all campus 

tournament. 

The four team field was set, 

Nuthin Fancy, the open league cham- 
pion by virtue of a playoff victory was 
set to play the Nature Boys, dorm 
champion by virtue of a playoff win 
over Bossier Hall in the first game. 
The second game saw Kappa Alpha, 
the Greek champion, play a powerful 
Bossier Hall squad, winner of the 
wildcard slot. 

In game one, Nuthin Fancy, led 
by quarterback Charlie Vienne and 
teammates Mike Fuller, Terry Mercer 
and Steve McCormick outclassed the 
Tim Smith and Todd Neitte led Na- 
ture Boys to the tune of 24-0. 

Game two pitted the Kappa 

Alpha crew against the Scholars' 

College Bunch from Bossier Hall. 

The KA's came out on top with a 26- 

25 lead. 

KA faced Nuthin Fancy for the 

title of all campus tide and the right to 
represent NSU at the state flag foot- 
ball tournament. Many thought it was 
impossible to top yesterdays game 
(Bossier-KA) for excitement, quality 
of competition and sportsmanship but 
this final game of the 1988 season was 
something to remember. 

KA leader Randy Crow stated, 
"We felt very confident going into the 
final game, after winning the final 
game in Greek competition over Alpha 
Phi Alpha 27-12, we felt our chances 
were better than average. We started 
to peek at the right time and overcame 
injuries. Not many folks realize how 
physically and mentally demanding a 
championship game can be. We never 
played college football, but this game 
is as important to us as any college 
bowl game might be to the college 

athlete." 

Crow led KA in drawing first 

blood as he passed 2 yards to David 
Wolfe to stake KA to a 6-0 lead. 

In overtime, both teams are given 
4 plays from the 10 yard line to score 
and this would continue until a winner 
is declared. 

KA won the toss and had the first 
opportunity to score with the ball. After 



an incomplete pass and a loss of 5 yards 
on second down, Crow hit Dan Pickett 
with a 15 yard pass for the score and the 
PAT was good to take a 7 point lead. 
Nuthin Fancy failed on 4 attempts to 
cross the line in the endzone and the 
game of the year, the last game of the 
season, ended — KA 34-Nuthin Fancy 
27. 

The intramural team tennis tour- 
nament was also held last week with 14 
teams and 56 players competing for the 
honors. In team competition, Tri Sigma 
captured the sorority league title with 
Tappa Kegga Lite winning the open 
division and Sabine 3rd taking the 
women's dorm honors. Kappa Sigs beat 
out TKE and 4 other teams for the 
Greek title and Blues Boys from Rapi- 
des won out in the 4 team men's dorm 
action. 

Individual winners included Anne 
LaHaye and Ginger Craig in women's 
doubles and Kelly Shotwell and Stepha- 
nie Mitchell in single competition. Matt 
Tarver and Brad Wright along with Jim 
Neil and Todd Keenan won the men's 
doubles with John Neil, Robert 
Childers, Von Klotzbach and Ray 
Navaro taking single championships. 

Volleyball is the next team sport 
activity for the leisure activities intra- 



mural program with a mandatory teams 
captains meeting set for tomorrow, 
Wednesday, October 26th at 7 p.m. in 
the IM/Rec Building. All individuals 
and teams, men and women, wishing to 
compete in Volleyball should make 
plans to attend this important meeting. 
Co-rec volleyball is also on the docket, 
with the entry deadline set for Monday, 
October 31st. For additional informa- 
tion come by the IM/rec Building or 
call 357-4561,357-5462. 

With 31 intramural teams com- 
peting, the President Cup races in all 
divisions finds the leaders to be Tappa 
Kegga Lite 97 points to Hooperettes 70 
points in the women's cpen division, 
Tri Sigma 144 points to Phi Mu's 122 
and Sigma Kapp?'? 107 points in the 
sorority league and Sabine 3rd/ Adidas 
with 40 points to Boozeman's 20 points 
in the Women's dorm league. 

In the men's division, Kappa 
Alpha leads Kappa Sigma 138-132 with 
TKE presently in the third place with 
109 points. New Orleans Crescent leads 
the Nature Boys 77-67 in Dorm compe- 
tition with Bossier Hall in third place 
with 60 points. Nuthin Fancy leads 
Troop One 64-54 in the overall stand 
ings for the open league President's 
Cup race. 



Band to 
explode 



NORTHWESTERN -TheStu- 
dent Activities Board presents the last 
tailgate party of the season, featuring 
a live performance from Exiton Octo- 
ber 29 at 3:30 p.m. until 6:30 p.m. 
Exit, one of the hottest bands in north- 
west Louisiana, originated about five 
years ago in Shreveport, playing vari- 
ous clubs such as Humfrees' and 
Cowboy's. 

Recently the band opened for 
Expos6 here at NSU and is working 
on an album that should be cut in 
December. Exit's explosive show 
consists of many new cover tunes and 
numerous originals that will be in- 
cluded on their new album. 

The band members are: Danny 
Orton, lead vocals and keyboards; 
Greg Fulco, guitar and background 
vocals; John Compton, bass giutar 
and background vocals; Dwayne 
Dupuy, keyboards and background 
vocals; and Chris LeFebvre, drums. 
Catch one of the most talked-about 
acts around here on campus at the 
TNT party. 




Danny Orton, lead singer of the Exit, will appear at the final 
Northwestern Tailgate Party of the season on October 29. 



• ■Hi Uli 



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= OCTOBER 25, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 5 



SPORTS 



Demons excel to 
outplay Bearkats 



By CHRIS McGEE 
Sports Writer 

What a difference a year makes! 
Last season the Sam Houston State 
Bearkats clobbered the Northwestern 
State Demons 34-7 on the way to a 5- 
1 Southland Conference finish. This 
year it is the Demons who appear to 
have a full head of steam with a 6-1 
overall record (3-0 in conference) 
while the Bearkats struggle along at 3- 
4 (0-2 in SLC play). 

Despite the Demons' six-game win 
streak, it may be the best time for 
SHSU to catch NSU, considering the 
festive weekend the Demons enjoyed 
in taking the State Fair Classic 27-15 
over Northeast Louisiana. It was an 
emotional weekend for the Demons, 
and they must keep their guard up to 
shield themselves from an emotional 
breakdown against the Bearkats. 

Rest assured that NSU head coach 
Sam Goodwin will see to it that prac- 
tice this week will sober up his boys 
from the NLU victory before the Sam 
Houston State team can. 

"I'm glad we're playing them now 
because we're coming off an emo- 
tional win and are looking ahead to 
the North Texas game, and this would 
be a perfect time to catch us sleeping," 
said Goodwin. "But we're going to 
keep reminding our kids that last year' s 
loss was, after getting shut out by 
Louisiana Tech, the low point of our 
season." 

The Bearkats will be determined to 
unseat the Demons from their high 
perch. If they find a way to do so, it 
would be a most appropriate chapter 
in a season that has become a roller- 
coaster ride, a ride that SHSU wishes 
that it could get off of. 

SHSU opened up the 1988 cam- 
paign by soundly beating Angelo S tate 
20-3, but dropped its next two games, 
14-10 to Boise State and 33-0 to 
Southwestern Louisiana. Theupsand 
downs continued as the Bearkats won 
their next two before dropping a 17- 
10 decision to Stephen F. Austin. 
Last week the Bearkats were dismem- 
bered by North Texas, the top-ranked 
team in Division I-AA, 24-3. 

"They haven't produced the of- 
fense this year like they've done in the 
past I remember how bad they beat us 
last year, and that'll be a factor for us," 
stated Goodwin. 

To contend with SHSU is to con- 
tend with a strong defensive line. 



Marvin Brown and Mike Ober are the 
anchors of this unit for the Bearkats. 

"They've got a great defensive 
front," comments Goodwin. "Last 
year they had (Marvin) Brown, and 
this year they have (Mike) Ober, who 
I think might be better than Brown. I 
don't see how we can compete with 
them up front." 

SHSU returns 15 starters from the 
1987 squad that recorded an 8-3 rec- 
ord. The notable return offensively is 
that of tight end Ricky Eggleston who 
was first-team all-Southland Confer- 
ence last season. He caught 32 passes 
last year, 6 for scores. 

Along with the solid SHSU defen- 
sive front, the Demons will have to try 
their hand at neutralizing linebacker 
Lish Adams. Last year Adams led the 
Bearkats in tackles, notching 1 17. He 
also recorded 4 sacks and 1 1 tackles 
for losses. Needless to say, Adams 
will be a force to be reckoned with. 

From the medical side: the De- 
mons are incurring numerous injuries 
after virtually sidestepping the nag- 
ging bug for the first five weeks of the 
season. Offensive guard Mike Owens 
suffered a broken arm versus North- 
east and will be out for the year. That 
loss is magnified when the injury of 
tackle Jay Anderson is considered. 

Other Injuries include the follow- 
ing: TE Orlan Lockhart- shoulder 
injury, defensive end Henry Sibley- 
shoulder, Randy Hilliard and Andre 
Carron-dislocated finger. All are 
questionable for Saturday night's 
tussle with Sam Houston State. 

The Demons may be in store for a 
defensive chess match with the Bear- 
kats. While SHSU ranks dead last in 
scoring offense among all SLC teams, 
they are the supreme defense in the 
conference. The Bearkats surrender 
an average of just 207.8 yards tc 
opposing offenses. The interesting 
bit of information is that the Demons 
lead the SLC in total offense with 
420.71 yards an outing. Something's 
gotta give. 

The Demons continue to climb in 
the polls. This week NSU finds itself 
in the thirteenth spot in the Division I- 
AA top 20 poll. The Demons have 
now won six straight games, the first 
time since 1969-70. 

Saturday night's kickoff is set for 
7:00 p.m. in Turpin Stadium. It will 
be the last chance for Northwestern 
fans to get a look at their team at home 
this season. 



State Fair... continued from page 1 



Goodwin later added, "We 're world, 
beaters for three quarters and then 
hang on in the fourth (quarter). We 
didn ' t get very good production out of 
our fullbacks, but (Scott) Stokerhada 
great game." 

He most certainly did. Blessed 
with a world of time in the pocket, a 
gift bestowed on him by a determined 
offensive line, Stokerplucked the NLU 
defense like a ripe chicken. The 5-8 
product of Alexandria Senior High 
threw for 228 yards as he completed 
1 5 of 22 passes, including the 33 yarder 
ro Mayfield for the Demons' third 
score. 

Mayfield and Turner redefined the 



term Air Force, teaming for 10 
catches and 1 8 1 yards through the air. 
Lockhartadded3 catches for 5 1 yards. 

Not only did the Demons pay back 
Northeast for last year's blunder and 
rid themselves up the State Fair 
creepies, but they more importantly 
improved to 3-0 in the Southland 
Conference standings. The Demons 
are now tied with North Texas and 
Stephen F. Austin for the top spot in 
conference play. 

Indeed, the Demons excursion to 
Shreveportproved to be a very fruitful 
endeavor. As NSU Sports Informa- 
tion Director Tom Wancho would say, 
'No longer must we refer to it as the 
'State UN-Fair Classic!'" 



Live Ghoulish Monsters at 

Hello Dolly 



Prank & Party 
introduces 

FACE PAINTING 
for Halloween 

Come Have Your Face Made Up 
For Any Character You Want To Be 
Mon. Oct. 31 
12 noon to 5:30 



PRANK & PARTY 

826 Kyser Ave 352-2384 



•Any Character 
•Full Faced 
•Very Detailed 
•$5.00 
•Call Today 
for Appointment 
•Will Take Walk-Ins 



•Freddie 

•Clowns 

•Dracula 

•Devil 

•Cat 

•Skull 

•Lion 

•and more 



I 
I 
I 

L 



COUPON 
for 10% discount on 
$5 Jace Painting Fee 





STOREWIDE 
SALE 
30% OFF 
Drawing for best costumes 

Refreshments 
Halloween Night, Oct. 31 
7-9p.m. 




628 Front St. 





352-6699 



m 



BODY 



» t C M | 



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2? 

$4.00 BEER BUST 
TOM & UODKfl COLLINS $1 
I ONG I SLRNin I TED TER $1 
RLL NIGHT LONG 



FRIDAY, OCTOBERS 
$1 BAR DRINKS 9-12 
MILLER GENUINE DRAFT, $1 
LONG ISLAND ICED TEA $1 
MARGARITAS $1.50 
ALL NIGHTLONG 



SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29 
160Z. DRAFT $1 
KAMIKAZEES 75$ 
LONG ISLAND ICED TEA $1.50 

ALL NIGHT LONG 




A MESSAGE 
TO THOSE WHO LONG 
FOR OUR NECKS. 

When we created cold-filtered™ Miller Genuine Draft, we thought you'd like it. 
We just didn't know how much. 

The fact is, it's the fastest-growing premium beer in America. And Genuine 
Draft in longnecks is so popular, it's been tough to keep up with demand. 

But don't worry. We're working hard to put those longnecks back in your 
hand. And soon you should be able to enjoy the rich, smooth taste of real draft in 
your favorite bottle again . 

In the meantime, if you can't find Miller Genuine Draft in longnecks, we 
suggest you drink something else. 

Miller Genuine Draft in regular bottles. Or cans. 

COLD-FILTERED" 
MILLER GENUINE DRAFT 
LONGNECKS 



c 19SS Millet Brewing Co.. Milwaukee. Wl 



PAGE 6 



CURRENT SAUCE 



CAMPUS LINE 



Scholars' College 

The Scholar's College Student 
Life Enrichment Committee is spon- 
soring a haunted house from 8 p.m.. 
until midnight Friday Oct 28 through 
Mon., Oct 3 1 . Tours begin on the front 
steps of Russell Hall and admission is 
$.50. Everyone is invited to be taken 
on this tour of terror. 



NSU Catholic Students 

Father Tom Jezak of Holy Cross 
Catholic Church will celebrate mass 
here on campus Sunday, Oct 30, at 1 1 
am. in the President's Room of the 
Student Union. All NSU faculty, staff, 
students, friends and families are 
welcome to attend. If there are any 
students interested in participating as 
liturgical minister, eucharistic minis- 
ter or ministers of music, stop by the 
Student Support Services Office, 
Kyser Hall, Rm 104, or call Gail Jones 
at 5901. 



Free Tutoring 

NSU Student Services offers free 
tutoring in most subject areas Mon- 
day through Friday from 8 a.m. 
through 4:30 p.m. in room 215 A in 
Watson Memorial Library. 

Nursing Majors 

The Departmental Reading and 
Arithmetic tests will be given Thurs- 
day, October 27 in Rm. 138 Kyser 
Hall. The reading test will begin at 4 
p.m. The arithmetic test will begin ai 
5 p.m. 

Students must have completed 
all English, Reading and Math devel- 
opmental courses to be eligible to take 

exams. 

Students are required to bring 
one ID to gain entry into the exams. 



French Tutoring 

The NSU French Club, Le Cercle 
Fran?ais, includes several members 
who are fluent in the French language. 
The club offers a tutoring program at 
$3 per week. Interested persons may 
call 352-5850 or 352-9394. 



FCS 

The Fellowship of Christian 
Students will be meeting every 
Wednesday from 7 p.m. til 8:30 p.m> 
in Rm. 320 of the Student Union. 
Everyone is welcome and encouraged 
to attend. 

Freshmen 

The freshman class will be host- 
ing a fall dance for all freshmen from 
8 p.m. to midnight on November 16 at 
the Rec. Complex. A theme for the 
dance will be announced later. 



Phi Beta Lambda 

The following members will be 
going to the National Fall Leadership 
Conference in Mobile, Alabama: 
Margaret Kilcoyne, sponsor; Rhonda 
Nelms, president; Susan Smith, par- 
limentarian and Angela Maggiore, 
secretary. The conference will be held 
Nov. 4-6. The next meeting will be 
Novermber. All members please at- 
tend. 



Journalism majors 

The second annual wine and 
cheese party for journalism majors 
will be hosted by Tommy Whitehead 
at his residence on Wed., October 26 
from 5 p.m. to 8. Contact Tommy 
Whitehead for information on trans- 
portation to the party and directions. 



Argus 

The deadline for Argus' fall 
contest is November 1. Cash prizes 
will be awarded for the best fiction 
poetry and personal essays. 

The first place entry in each of 
these categories will earn a S50 prize. 
Second place will earn a S35 prize and 
third place will earn a $25 prize. Also, 
a prize of $50 will be awarded for the 
single best one-act play. 

In addition to the three prizew- 
inners in peotry, five unranked honor- 
able mentions will be chose. These 
will not earn any prize money, but 
they will be assured publication in the 
magazine. 

One honorable mention will be 
selected in fiction as well. 

Those who wish to submit ma- 
terial for consideration should obtain 
cover sheets form the Argus offic, 
complete them, and attach them to 
their manuscripts. ONly the social 
security number should appear on the 
manuscript itself. All entries must be 
typewritten. 

Any submissions failing to meet 
these simple requirements will not be 
considered. These instructions are also 
posted on the Argus office door. 
Completed submissions and cover 
sheets should be turned in to Argus, 
Room 316A, Kyser Hall. 

All students are still invited to 
become members of the Argus staff. 
Staffers hang flyers, help select the 
content of the magazine, assist with 
"production and distribution and copy- 
edit. 

Rowing Team 

Anyone interested in the North- 
western Rowing Team should go to 
practices Monday through Friday from 
5 to 6 p.m. at Chaplin's Lake. Anyone 
unable to make practice can call 357- 
5971. 



CODOFIL 

The Council for the Develop- 
ment of French in Louisiana is organ- 
izing its 20th Anniversary Reunion ir 
the historical city of Natchitoches on 
Saturday, November 5, 1988. A'l pasi 
participants in CODOFTL's study and 
exchange programs since 1968 and 
particularly all scholarship recipients, 
are invited to attend this free day of 
activities and fun. Come meet the 
people you traveled with as well as 
various officials from Belgium, 
France, Quebec and New Brunswick 
on Saturday, November 5, at North- 
western State University. 

For more information or regis- 
tration call CODOFIL at (318) 265- 
5810. 

Merci beaucoup! 



Phi Mu 

Phi Mu is raffling a Samurai 
Jeep. Any interested persons should 
contact a Phi Mu active or provisional 
member. An amount of $5 will allow 
a pe r son two chances at winning the 
jeep. 



Pre-registration 

Students who hated standing 
in long lines at registration this fall 
now have a chance to avoid the wait 
with early registration. 

Early registration for the 
Spring 1989 semester will being on 
Monday, November 7, 1988 through 
Friday, December 2. All continuing 
students who are in good academic 
standing are eligible for early regis- 
tration. 

All money for pre-registra- 
tion j will be paid at the time of regular 
registration for the spring semester. 

For more information con- 
tact the Registrar's Office in Roy Hall. 



For Rent: Two BR moble 
home, furnished, central A/C- 
H, off Hwy 6 West on Chester 
Lane $185/Mo plus deposit- 
352-3970 



CRUISE SHIP JOBS! 

Immediate opemngsl Seasonal & 
career opportunities. Excellent pay. 
World Travell 
Call (Refundable) 

1-518-459-3535 EXT. P 4155 C. 



NEEDC/.SH? EARN $250-350 EACH 
SEMESTER, BY WORKING 2-4 HOURS 
EACH WEEK, POSTING AND MAIN- 
TAIN. NO TAKE -ONE POSTERS. WE 
GP.T. ^COMENDATIONS: GREAT FOR 
TEE MARKETING PIELDS ALSO. 
CALL 1-800-821-1543. 



MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ! 
Regardless of credit 
history. Also, new credit 
cards. No one refused! * 
For information call . . . 
1-315-733-6063 Ext. #M817 




AND GIFTS 



926 College Avenue • Natchitoches. Louisiana 71457 
John & Faye Prlct, Owners 



Bobby Waggoner, R.Ph. 

Bus. 352-9740 
Res. 352-4246 



Alvln DaBllMix, R.Ph. 

Bus. 352-9740 
Res. 352-4923 



HOURS: MON-FRI, 8a.m.-6p.m.., SAT 8a.m.-5p.m 



Attention NCHS Graduates: 

Your 1988 yearbooks hove arrived! 
You can pick up your Chinquapin on 
Tuesday, October 25, 
at Natchitoches Central from 

2 p.m. to 6 p.m. 
Do not come during classes. 
If you are unable to 
pick up your yearbook or 
have any questions, 
contact Mrs. Dala Yates at 352-6054. 



DP JUNCTION J -d or 



DIXIE PLAZA CENTER 



Misses 
Fashions 



Come early to our 

FALL SALE 

1/3 OFF All New Fall 

Soon Jeans & Jackets 
PLUS 

a Collection of Our New 
Fall Merchandise at up to 
1/3 OFF Reg. Price! 

No exchanges-No refunds! 
Bargain Rack up to 60% Off 




LUNCH BUFFET 



$2.99 

(with coupon) 

Reg. 3.29 



♦Pizza * Spaghetti 
*25« Drink Refills 
♦Salad/Desert Bar 
*7 days a week 11a.m. -2p.m. 



NIGHT BUFFET 

Sun., Mon., Tues., Wed., & Thurs. 

All You Can Eat- $3.79 

No coupon needed 

Pizza Delivery 

357-1135 
We deliver from 11 a.m. -close 
NSU Discount with ID on dine-in 
or take out only 



This space contributed as a public service. 




What are the three biggest lies in the world? 
Smoking is relaxing. Smoking is glamorous. Lung cancer won't happen to me. 
This year, 125,000 Americans learned the truth about smoking 
when they were diagnosed with lung cancer. 

Every quitter is a winner. 
The Great American Smokeout. Nov. 17. 



I- 



AMERICAN 
CANCER 
SOCIETY 



Created as a public service by McCaffrey and McCall, Inc. 



, 1988 






NOVEMBER 1, 1988 NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 

OF LOUISIANA 



VOL 77, NO. 14 



es: 

rived! 

'non 




State Fair memento offered 



Victory football prize in raffle 




A game ball from the 1988 State Fair victory over 
Northeast Louisiana University is being raffled off 
by the Northwestern Atretic Association. 

Chances are $1 or 6 for $5. Chances may be pur- 
chased from the Athletic Department in the Field 
House, any football coach, or any house director in 
the residence halls. 

The drawing will be held Wednesday, Nov. 16 at 
the Quarterback Club Luncheon. 

Presented with the 19HS State Fair football are 
Demon football player? Sean Freeman, Chuck 
Orzehowski, Keith Hodne;?, Brian Guidry and David 
Chitman. 



Illegal magazines cause uproar 



By SONYA RIGAUD 
Editor 

A recent rash of unsolicited 
magazine sales on campus has 
prompted both University Police and 
the Office of Student Life to issue 
warnings to all Northwestern students. 

Fred Fulton, Dean of Student 
Life, said, "There are students at NSU 
who are selling merchandise, maga- 
zines among them , without the proper 
authorization." He stressed that this 
written authorization, which must 
come from the Vice President of 
University Affairs, must be displayed 
before a sale can be made and can be 
asked for if the vendor does not ap- 
pear to be legitimate. 

"The bookstore can sell maga- 
zines because they've got that au- 



thorization," said Fulton. "But we've 
got some people here who are just 
selling on their own and pocketing the 
profit." 

David Antilley, a junior here at 
NSU, had been approached by a stu- 
dent who wanted to sell him maga- 
zines. "I didn't know what was going 
on,"hesaid. "I've never had someone 
come up to me on the street and try and 
sell me a magazine." 

According to Fulton, a student 
needs to be awareof three things when 
someone is trying to sell merchandise 
personally. 'They should be con- 
scious that they're getting their 
money's worth, they definitely need 
to make sure that the salesperson is 
legitimate, and that they get the mer- 
chandise they pay for." 



Policy D:03 in NSU's Policies 
and Procedures manual lists rules for 
peddling, or personal sales contact or 
solicitation. "Peddling...isprohibited 
at all University facilities unless the 
vendor has secured written authoriza- 
tion from the appropriate University 
officer." The policy also states that 
any solicitor present on campus with- 
out proper authority should be re- 
ported immediately to University 
Police. 

The policy goeson to state: "The 
operation of any on-campus conces- 
sions sales activities by University or 
non-University persons is prohibited 
if the items to be sold are already 
available through contract between 
the University and outside businesses 
or through the University Bookstore." 



"In other words," said Fulton, 
"if the Bookstore's got it, the person 
who's selling it down the street doesn ' t 
have authorization and is probably 
illegal." It is vital that the written 
permission is viewed before the sale it 
made, he said. 

Policy D:03 also reads, "Per- 
sons on campus who buy from itiner- 
ant vendors do so at their own risk." 
Northwestern cannot be held respon- 
sible for any sales made on campus, 
said Fulton. 

"All students should be on their 
guard for anyone who wants to sell 
them anything just off the street," 
Fulton remarked. "It's in a student' 
best interest to buy from established 
merchants instead of someone he's 
never seen before." 



Early registration 
saves panic, hassle 



By H. SCOTT JOLLEY 
StaffWriter 

Whip out those spring sched- 
ules and avoid those dreaded lines — 
it'stimefor Early Registration. Start- 
ing on November 7, continuing NSU 
students will be able to schedule their 
classes for the 1989 spring semester 
without having to go through the 
drudge of Regular Registration. 

Undergraduates who wish to 
register early can stop by the Student 
Union Lobby and pick up their Stu- 
dent Schedule Request Card. Using 
the new schedule of spring classes 
students can then fill out his course 
selections, making sure that alternate 
classes and sections are listed. The 
student's advisor must sign the re- 
quest card. Spring schedules can be 
picked up on Friday, November 4, at 
either the bookstore or the Registrar's 
Office. 

"Early Registration is done at 
the student's convenience," stated Bill 
McConathy of the Registrar's Office. 
"There is no set time for someone to 
come and pick up their request card. 
Whenever they feel like it, they can 
register early." Graduate students 
who want to go through Early Regis- 
tration can go to the Graduate School 
Office in Roy Hall. There they can 
pick up their request card and go 
through the registration process. 

Any student going through Early 
Registration must make sure that he or 
she is in good academic standing with 
Northwestern. "The university holds 
it to be the responsibility of the stu- 
dent to be aware of his academic status 
prior to registration,'.' said McCon- 
athy. If a student is not in good stand- 
ing, his registration will be canceled 
without a fee refund. 



After a schedule request card 
has been filled outand signed, itshould 
be taken to the Registrar's Office for 
processing. Once the classes have 
been entered into the computer, the 
completed schedule can be picked up. 
McConathy stressed the importance 
of obtaining the complete student 
schedule. "This will be the only veri- 
fication a student has that he has been 
enrolled for the spring semester. If 
there is a problem with his registra- 
tion, the only way he will be notified 
is by picking up his schedule." 

McConathy pointed out that any 
student who goes through Early Reg- 
istration will pay no fees. "All money 
will be paid at the time of Regular 
Registration for the spring semester." 

"If a student registers early," 
said McConathy, "but decides that he 
will not be attending NSU for the 
spring, he must provide written notifi- 
cation to the Registrar's Office prior 
to the first day of class." Upon receipt 
of this notice, the student's registra- 
tion will be canceled. 

Graduating seniors at North- 
western hav e a special need for Early 
Registration. According to McCon- 
athy, "it affords the graduating sen- 
iors the only opportunity for them to 
be positive that they get the classes 
they need. " There is no separate time 
for graduating seniors to register dur- 
ing Regular Registration. 

Early Registration for the 1989 
spring semester begins on Monday, 
November 7, and continues until Fri- 
day, December 2. Undergraduates 
register at the Student Union while 
graduates go to the Graduate Student 
Office in Roy Hall. Don't stand in 
line — register early. 



Travel provides valuable experience 

Foreign education offered by Northwestern Abroad 



NATCHITOCHES— Educa- 
• tional experiences in England, Wales, 
I Spain, Scotland, and Austria have been 
, announced as the 1989 summer offer- 
ings of Northwestern Abroad, the 
international travel-study program 
1 initiated last February to expand 
Northwestern State University's edu- 
cational scope. 

Dr. Grady Harper, acting direc- 
tor of the Northwestern Abroad pro- 
gram, said overseas study is "an excit- 
ing and highly motivating means for 
university students, as well as other 
individuals, to enrich their education 
and broaden their understanding of 
people and places beyond their local 
environments." 

"Northwestern Abroad seeks to 
Provide travel-study experiences for 



both traditional university students 
enrolled in college-level courses and 
individuals who wish to expand their 
knowledge of other languages, cus- 
toms, and cultures on a non-credit 
basis," stated Harper in announcing 
this summer's eight programs. 

Destinations, dates, courses, in- 
structors, and telephones numbers for 
further information, including costs 
per person , on the travel-study experi- 
ences being offered for the summer of 
1989 are as follows: 

England and Wales, June 7-20, 
Comparative Education 6010 (a 
comparison of British and American 
educational systems), Dr. Mildred 
Bailey, (3 1 8) 357-585 1 ; England and 
Wales, June 7-20, Library Education 
5260 (a comparison of British and 



American library systems and library 
educational programs), Dr. Ada Jarred, 
(318) 357-4403; Spain, June 8-21, 
Watercolor Painting and Art History 
Research, Dr. Bill Bryant, (3 18) 357- 
4544; Spain, June 8-21, Spanish 3080 
(a practical experience in traditional 
Spanish conversation), Dr. Nick Leka- 
tis,(318) 357-5651. 

Other courses offered are: 
London, England, Augustl-14, Fine 
Arts 1040 (a survey exploring music, 
visual arts, drama, dance, film and 
architecture), Tony S mith, (3 1 8) 357- 
4522; England and Scotland, July 14- 
17, Physical Education 1110/1180 
(golfing in Great Britain), Dr. David 
Scogin, (318) 357-5126; andAustria, 
July 31-August 16, Music 4480 (a 
study of orchestra literature for 



schools, including participation in the 
fourteenth annual Classical Music 
Festival and Seminar), Dr. Robert 
Watson, (318) 357-4522; London, 
England, dates to be announced, 
Dance4070 (historical study of dance 
and dance performance), Mrs. Bar- 
bara Hernandez, (318) 357-5126. 

Graduate students may enroll in 
the Library Education and Compara- 
tive Education programs. Field trips 
for the courses depart for England on 
June 7 for a 13-day motorcoach tour 
of England and Wales, highlighted by 
visits to British classrooms and librar- 
ies, as well as a seminar session at the 
University of Wales in Aberystwyth. 

The groups will be led by Dr. 
Mildred Bailey, professor of educa- 
tion and dean of the School of Gradu- 



ateStudiesandResearch.andDr. Ada 
Jarred, professor of library science 
and director of Northwestern's Eu- 
gene P. Watson Memorial Library. 

Dr. Bill Bryant, professor of art, 
and Dr. Nick Lekatis, associate pro- 
fessor of Spanish, will take 14-day 
field trips to Spain with students in 
their respective disciplines traveling 
together. 

Dr. David Scogin, professor of 
health, physical education and recrea- 
tion , will teach physical education and 
lifetime sports with emphasis on the 
sport of golf, featuring lessons and 
competition on several of Great 
Britain's major and most historic 
country clubs and courses. 

This Northwestern Abroad- 
sponsored course will be made in 



conjunction with the Cooperative 
Center for Study in Britain. Several 
participants are expected to audit this 
course for the unique opportunity of 
engaging in one of the oldest lifetime 
sport activities. 

Tony Smith, assistant professor 
of music, will lead the fine arts course 
to England. This freshman-level.core 
curriculum course will provide inter- 
ested students and other individuals 
with a two-week field trip to London, 
where the group will attend plays in 
London's theaters, visit major art 
galleries, view dance performances 
and hear concerts by London's major 

Abroad . . . 
continued on page 2 



Repertory Theatre performs "Romeo and Juliet" 




By CAROLINE WARD 
StaffWriter 

Recently, Northwestern students 
and other theatre buffs had the oppor- 
tunity to watch the performance of a 
classic Shakespearean play, Romeo 
°nd Juliet. The play was presented by 
the Louisiana Repertory Theatre 
(LRT). 

According to Warren Hammock, 
director of LRP, "This year we bring 
together three entities: Horse Cave 
Theatreof Kentucky (HCT),aprofes- 
S| onal regional theatre, Northwestern 
State University of Louisiana, and the 
People of Natchitoches and north/ 
central Louisiana. Together we have 
combined forces and abilities to launch 
w hat we believe can be a vital arts 
Or ganization in this region." 



Romeo was played by Gregory 
Payne. Payne is a native of Hurricane, 
West Virginia. He recently finished a 
spring touring of Kentucky and Indi- 
ana with the Blue Apple Players. They 
performed an original production 
known as Down From the Sky, a drug 
and alcohol abuse program aimed at 
school age children. Payne is a gradu- 
ate of Berea College and is currently 
in his first season at the HCT. 

Amy Slade portrayed Juliet. 
Slade is also a graduate of Berea 
College. ShehasaBA. degree in both 
theatre and Spanish. Slade also acted 
as scenic artist at Berea for four years. 
Slade says that Juliet is among one of 
her favorite roles. Her future plans 
include being active in theatre as both 



an actress and a scenic artist and 
someday maybe Hispanic theatre. 

Friar Lawrence was played by 
Ronald J. Aulgur, now going into his 
fourth season with HCT. Aulgur per- 
formed this past winter at the New 
Stage Theatre in Jackson, Mississippi 
and with the Arkansas Repertory 
Theatre. He received his training from 
the Neighborhood Playhouse School 
of the Theatre in New York and from 
the University of Kentucky . He is also 
a member of the Actors' Equity Asso- 
ciation (AEA). 

Felix Eckhard portrayed 
Romeo's friend Mercutio. Eckhard is 
a graduate of the Webber-Douglas 
Academy of Dramatic Art in London, 
England. He has performed in 29 
mainstage productions over the past 



32 months, including performances in 
Dallas, Houston, Little Rock, Nash- 
ville, Horse Cave, and now Natchito- 
ches. During this past year, Eckhard 
spent five months as an artist in resi- 
dence at Berea College. 

Benvolio, another friend of 
Romeo, was portrayed by Scott Hub- 
bard of Berea, Kentucky. Hubbard 
received a B.A. degree in English 
from Berea College. While at Berea 
College, Hubbard also received ex- 
tensive training and experience in 
acting, directing, stage managing, 
scenery construction, and lighting. 
Hubbard's ultimate dream is to per- 
form with the Royal Shakespearean 
Company in London. 

Gregory Etter, now in his fourth 
year with HCT, portrayed Montague, 



father of Romeo. Etter has served for 
three years as HCT' s resident lighting 
designer. He appeared in the CBS 
miniseries, "Bluegrass," and has 
toured with such theatres as the Ne- 
braska Theatre Caravan, and the Hil- 
berry Repertory Company. 

Lady Montague was performed 
by Andrea Gallo, another member of 
AEA. Andrea attended both Temple 
University and the Universite de la 
Sorbonne in Paris, France. Gallo re- 
ceived the Annette Kade (Fullbright) 
Award for study in Paris. 

Capulet, father of Juliet, was 
portrayed by Scott Edmonds, also an 
AEA member. Edmonds has been a 
professional actor for 37 years. He 
fondly remembers working with such 
people as Henry Fonda and Susan 



Hay ward. He also shared classes with 
Marilyn Monroe in Lee Strasberg's 
private acting studio. 

Lady Capulet was played by 
Leslie Lynn Meeker. A member of 
AEA, she has been seen on "As the 
World Turns," the Muppets Take Man- 
hattan, and commercially for Sanka 
and Playschool. 

Juliet's nurse was portrayed by 
Jcdy McCoy. Jody earned a B.S. 
degree from Oregon State University 
and an MA. from the University of 
Oregon. Her past includes 20 years of 
work on the Oregon and Washington 
stages and teaching speech, drama, 

LRT . . . 

continued on page 2 



wm 



PAGE 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



NOVEMBER 1, 198 



NEWS 



mm 



NO\ 



EC 



Business Department presents workshop RESEARCH PAPERS 



NATCHITOCHES— The 

Small Business Development Center 
at Northwestern State University and 
the Service Corps of Retired Execu- 
tives will present a two-session work- 
shop on "Going Into Business For 
Yourself' Tuesday , November 1 5, and 
Thursday, November 17, in the Came 
River Room of the Sylvan Friedman 
Student Union at Northwestern State 
University. 

The two-session workshop, 
which will cover all the "nuts and 
bolts" of running a business to im- 
prove a person's opportunities for 
success, will be conducted from 7 



p.m. to 9:30 p.m. each night. 

Registration fees are $20 for pre- 
registration and $25 at the door of the 
first workshop session. 

NSU Small Business Develop- 
mentCenter director Dr. Barry Smiley 
and assistant director Mary Lynn 
Wilkerson will be conducting the 
workshop sessions. 

The Tuesday session will in- 
clude discussions of "Managing Your 
Small Business," "Marketing Strat- 
egy," and "Small Business Admini- 
stration Assistance." 

Topics for the Thursday session 
are "Assessing Small Business Op- 



portunities," "Financial Planning," 
and "Dealing With the Bank." 

The Small Business Develop- 
ment Center at Northwestern is spon- 
sored by the Louisiana Department of 
Economic Development and the 
United States Small Business Admini- 
stration. 

To pre-register or obtain further 
information on the two-session work- 
shop at Northwestern, call (318) 357- 
561 1 or write Small Business Devel- 
opment Center, Northwestern State 
University University, Natchitoches, 
LA, 71597. 



Northwestern displays invitational art exhibit 



NATCHITOCHES— The 

Louisiana Art Education Association's 
invitational exhibition is on dis- 
play October 23 through November 
18 in the Orville J. Hanchey Art Gal- 
lery of the A.A. Fredericks Creative 
and Performing Arts Center. 

The invitational exhibition, en- 
titled "Visions," features a variety of 
drawings, paintings, sculptures and 
mixed media created by 1 1 art educa- 
tors whose works of art were selected 
in a statewide competition for inclu- 
sion in the traveling exhibition. 



Northwestem's Department of 
Art is hosting the exhibition, which 
may be viewed from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. There is no admission charge to 
view the works of art. 

The participating artists and 
educators are Lloyd Bennett, George 
Wolfe, Wynette Cohen, Roscoe Red- 
dix and Jennie Osbom of New Or- 
leans, Ron Kennedy and Brenda 
Johnson of Baton Rouge, Joan Andre 
and Connie Reese of Slidell, Connie 



Davis of Covington, and Emma Mae 
Weeks of Lake Charles. 

The traveling exhibition opened 
earlier this month at the Hammond 
Cultural Center and is scheduled to be 
seen at McNeese State University in 
February and at Nicholls State Uni- 
versity in March. 

For further information on the 
Louisiana Art Education Association's 
invitational exhibition on display at 
Northwestern, call Dr. Bill Bryant in 
the NSU Art Department, (318) 357- 
4544. 



Abroad . . . continued from page 1 



symphonies and orchestras. 

Dr. Robert Watson, assistant 
professor of music, will be accompa- 
nying students interested in classical 
music to the 14th annual Classical 
Music Festival and Seminar in Vi- 
enna and Eisenstadt, Austria for two 
weeks in August. 

The opportunity exists for non- 
credit audit students including inter- 
ested NSU alumni and other individu- 
als to participate in each Northwest- 
ern Abroad travel-study experiences. 

The first Northwestern Abroad 
travel-study programs were offered in 
the summer of 1988, when a group 
consisting of students enrolled in two 
differentcourses traveled together last 
June for an educational field trip in 
England and Wales. 

Dr. Stan Chadick, professor of 
mathematics and a member of the 
faculty of the Louisiana Scholars' 
College at NSU, led a group of 10 
graduate students on a study of mathe- 
matics educational programs, and 
Harper instructed 25 graduate and 
undergraduate art students in water- 
color sketching and art history re- 
search. 



Last July , 1 1 French high school 
students and their adult leaders from 
Bordeaux, France, participated in a 
home-stay program in Natchitoches 
that was sponsored by Northwestern 
Abroad. The French Students' Home- 
Stay Program was coordinated by Mrs. 
Jan Frederick. 

Cultural and educational activi- 
ties for the visiting French students 
included tours of NSU, the movie sets 
of the Tri-Star Pictures and Ray Stark 
production of the movie "Steel Mag- 
nolias," local businesses, the State 
Capitol and Governor's Mansion in 
Baton Rouge, and traditional Cajun 
country and southern plantation life in 
Lafayette and other areas in South 
Louisiana. 

Eleven local families provided 
living accommodations for individual 
students during their summer stay in 
Natchitoches. 

According to Harper, negotiations 
for faculty exchanges are underway 
with the University College of Cape 
Breton in Nova Scotia and the Burgen- 
land State Educational system in Aus- 
tria. 



Included in the plans for North- 
western Abroad activities are summer 
school and between semester field trips 
by students seeking college credit as 
well as non-credit students enrolled in 
regular university courses and work- 
shops; summer term programs in Brit- 
ain for periods of nearly five weeks; a 
full year of study abroad by individual 
university students under the Interna- 
tional Student Exchange Program; 
faculty exchanges between NSU and 
foreign educational institutions of one 
term or one year durations; and foreign 
student summer cultural programs 
which bring overseas scholars to Natchi- 
toches to view American life and cul- 
ture on Northwestem's campus, in the 
city of Natchitoches and Natchitoches 
Parish, and throughout Louisiana. 

For further information on the 
Northwestern Abroad program and 
travel-study experiences overseas, call 
(318) 357-6565 or write Dr. Grady 
Harper, Acting Director, Northwestern 
Abroad, P.O. Box 5272, Northwestern 
State University, Natchitoches, La. 
71497. 



LRT . . . continued from page 1 



and library science. McCoy has also 
worked with the Seattle Children's 
Theatre and the Oregon Repertory 
Theatre. 

Clive Carlin portrayed Escalus, 
the Prince of Verona. Carlin received 
his theatre training in London. He has 
directed for the Lawrenceburg Com- 
munity Theatre in Lawrenceburg, 
Tennessee. He recently returned from 
Australia where he was working on an 
upcoming miniseries A Long Way 
From Home. 



Paris was portrayed by Tom 
Williams. Williams is a native of 
Russell ville, Kentucky and a graduate 
of Murray State University. He played 
the role of Ben Gibbens on the CBS 
miniseries, "Bluegrass," which aired 
last February. 

Tybalt was played by Timothy 
Hennigan. Hennigan is currently 
working on his B.S.A. at Northern 
Kentucky University. He isoriginally 



from Halifax, Massachusetts. Besides 
being an actor, Hennigan is experi- 
enced in the technical and design fields 
as well. 

The season continues until 
December 4. Audiences can look for- 
ward to such productions as Anna 
Christie by Eugene O'Neill, Noises 
Off by Michael Frayn, I'm Not 
Rappaport by Herb Gardner, and the 
Dickens Christmas Carol Show by 
Arthur Scholey. 




Leisure, 




HALF MITER 



On Wednesday, November 2nd, Leisure Activities will explode with its 
"First Annual Half Niter". The fuse will be lit by the flame from 
roasting hotdogs and toasting marshmellows. The nite will erupt with 
an evening of games and prizes, overflowing with excitement into a 
treasure hunt. The explosion will occur on WEDNESDAY, NOVEM- 
BER 2nd, from 8pm UNTIL MIDNIGHT at the Intramural Building. 
The catalyst for this powerful explosion is your team. Teams shall 
conslsit of 5 people and can be any combination of male/female 
members as long as both genders are represented. 



EVENTS ARE AS FOLLOWS 



Grass Sack Relay: Team Event 

each memeber shall hop one length of the gym 

Backward Free Throw: Team Event 

Each member shoot two backwards free throws 

Tennis Ball Pass: Team Event 

Food Eating Contest: Team Event 

f ach member will eat a food item 



Scooter Board Races: Team Event 
5 person medley relay 

Baby Bottle Coke Chug: Individual Event 
team points will be awarded 

Win, Lose, or Draw: Team Event 
single elimination tournament 

Treasure Hunt: Clues will be given 

every 30 minutes ' 



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NOVEMBER 1, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 3 



EDITORIAL 



























^'' ^Vriter offers alternative 

etlFreebies bring more students 

)Hop ^J or thwestern is known for a variety of things, from its nationally-ranked football team 
to its innovative president, Dr. Robert Alost. However, it is not known for its big-name 
cultural events, as evidenced by the problems with the Ray Charles concert. 

In such a small city with limited resources and a limited audience for cultural activities, 
it seems only logical that there not be many events of this nature here at Northwestern. Sure, 
there are a few, such as the New Orleans Symphony that appeared last year. 

But this year is very different. Northwestern is the home of the Louisiana Repertory 
Theater. The players will be performing various plays throughout the year, including/Borneo 
iitd Juliet and their own version of A Christmas Carol. They indeed have something for 
everyone's taste, from the farce Noises Off (which is supposed to be hilarious) to the tragic 
inna Christie. They will also perform the comedy I'm Not Rappaport. 

A few of you might remember the Missouri Repertory Theater who performed The 
Qlass Menagerie here last year. They gave an excellent performance. The LRT is also a 
professional theater company, so you can expect comparable, if not even better, perform- 
ances. 

The only drawback to these plays is the four dollar admission charge for each one. I 
mean, it's hard enough to get students to go to a free arts event let alone making them pay 
four, even eight dollars (with a date) to attend one. Why shouldn't these performances be 
included in our "Student Activities Fee?" The SAB could at least spring for one perform- 
ince, allowing students to simply present their I.D. in order to attend these events. 

But if you think about it, four dollars is very inexpensive for live, professional theater. 
Pine Arts instructors are billing it as the cost of a book. Everyone really ought to attend at 
east one of the shows, for it will not be very often when you will have a chance to see live 
heater for such a cheap price and not have to drive to Shreveport or New Orleans. Especially 
n Natchitoches, the City of Lights, everyone should line up to see A Christmas Carol. 

Everyone's always looking for something to do here in Natchitoches, so why not take in 
)ne of these plays. They're performed during the day and at night. It would be a great place 
o take a date if you want to impress her. There are pamphlets available all over campus 
isting the dates and times of each show. So pick one up and keep it. You never know when 
rou might want to find out when you can catch a show. 



mi 

n 

Is. 



Reader rebuttal 

Abortion: adoption not only choice 

Dear Editor, 

Recently you printed a letter to the editor with the headline "Legal abortion best in long run" written by Charlotte 
Hanks. Miss Hanks, in making her argument, chose to discuss the option of adoption. In doing so, she made a few errors. 
It is those erroneous statements that I would like to address. 

Miss Hanks states in her paragraph's lead sentence, "On the other hand let us say the child is put up for adoption. 
That would be a great solution if each unwanted baby bom had an immediate loving family to take him in." 

Today in the United States, one out of every six couples cannot have children, the Volunteers of America of North 
Louisiana is a state licensed adoption agency that has been located in Shreveport since 1935. We are only one adoption 
agency out of hundreds across the United States. We have many loving families waiting to adopt a child. 

Another incorrect statement then follows the first one, "More often it (adoption) turns out to be a succession of 
foster homes or orphanages." Adoption is the permanent placement of an infant or child into a family. The child is not 
a foster child or an orphan. The child is a life long member of a family, one family. 

Miss Hanks then implies that because couples have preference to sex, age, and race many infants are left 
unadoptable. Again, this statement is untrue. The VOA like other licensed agencies has many families of many races, 
ages, religious faiths and geographic regions. We also have couples that are very accepting of special needs infants 
(infants born with handicaps.) 

A child is not shuffled or left unparented as Miss Hanks indicated. There are too many couples that wish only to 
have a child to love and call their own. 

It takes a very special person, a loving person to consider adoption, when a woman makes that choice she can be 
assured that through a licensed agency, such as VOA, her child will have a loving, strong, committed couple that has 
been thoroughly studied that wants most in the world to become parents. 

Adoption is not the only choice. Adoption is not right for everyone. But, for many women, turning an unplanned 
pregnancy into a positive and loving decision is a viable solution and we are happy to help one and all. 

Lisa H. Brandeburg 
Volunteers of America of North Louisiana 



I 



BRAD BODENHEIMER 
Staff Writer 



r 1457 



Have something to say? 

WRITE A LETTER TO THE EDITOR! 



(, R.Ph. 

740 
923 

m.-5p.n 



Chief stresses 
bicycle safety 

Dear Editor, 

Due to the increased number of ve- 
hicles on campus and my personal obser- 
vation of students riding bicycles, I felt we 
all needed to be reminded of the Louisiana 
law on riding bicycles. Louisiana RS 
32:194 states: Every person riding a bi- 
cycle upon a highway of this state shall be 
granted all of the rights and shall be sub- 
ject to all the duties applicable to the driver 
of a vehicle. 

This means that if you can't do it in a 
car, you can't do it on a bicycle. This in- 
cludes red lights and stop signs. This law 
is for your own safety, so those of us who 
use this means of transportation, let's try to 
remember that the laws apply to bicycles 
too. 

Rickie A. William 
Chief, NSU Polio 




Dom'1 LeT IuDifFESENKE Be TyiE VJlMKiER $ 




(REPUBLISH) 



DONKEY 

(pemocsAT) 



Current Sauce 




The Cu/renfSauceispublishedweekly during the 
i 1 all and spring semesters by the students of Northwest- 
ern State University of Louisiana. It is not associated 
with any of the University's departments and is fi- 
nanced independently. 

The Current Sauce is based In the Office of 
Student Publications located in Kyser Haff. The office 
of the editorial staff is 225H , telephone (31 8) 357^5456. 
The adviser's office is 103 Kyser Hail, telephone 357- 
5213. 

: The mailing address for the Current Saueeis P.O. 
Box 5306, NSU, Natchitoches, LA 71 497. 

All correspondence, including letters to the edi- 
tor is welcome. Material submitted for consideration 
must be mailed to the above address or brought to 
the office. 

The deadline for all advertisement and copy is 3 
p.m. each Friday. Inclusion of any and all material is 
left to the discretion of the editor. 

Letters to the editor should be typed (double- 
spaced), signed and should delude a telephone 
number where the writer can be reached. No anony- 
mous letters will be printed. 

Current Sauce subscription rates are S 1 1 per 
academic year (28 issues) or So per semester (14 
issues). The paper is entered as second-class mail at 
Natchitoches. LA. The USPS number is 140-66C. 



SONY A RIGAUD 
Editor 

MICHELLE WEEGO 
Managing Editor 

MINDY BECK BRAD BODENHEIMER SHANNON BOUFFANIE 
BETH BOWMAN DeANNA COCHRAN SHANNON J. GREER 
H. SCOTT JOLLEY LAURIE LeBLANC ELIZABETH McDAVID 
CHRIS McGEE BRIAN McPHE ARSON ANNE MILLER 
CAROLINE WARD 
Staff Writers 

TIM JOHNSON RANDY JONES 
GLENMCORMAN ROBERT ROUGEAU 
Photographers 



ALLEN 
EVANS 
Advertising 



EVAN TAYLOR 
Cartoonist 

SCOTT MILLS 
Advertising assistant 

D AMI AN DOMING UE 
OLIVIA MAROM A 
Assistants to the editor 

TOM WHITEHEAD 
Adviser 



EDD LEE 
Circulation/ 
Distribution 



Fall '88 



CURRENT QUOTES 



What do you think is the main 
issue that will make a person 
vote for either candidate? 





Morris W. Sasser II 
CIS 

Sophomore, Deville 

"Defense, because if 
you don' t defend the coun- 
try, nothing else matters. 
Dukakis wants to do almost 
everything but protect the 
country. What good will that 
do if you don' t have a coun- 
try to do for?" 



Dot Coates 
General Studies 
Freshman, Monterey 

"Honestly, the morel 
hear about the two, the less 
certain I am about who is 
the better man. Dukakis, I 
think, got lucky when he was 
governor of Massachusetts, 
but Bush has never proven 
himself to be a decisive 
person." 





Alison Conner 
Liberal Arts 
Freshman, Racine, WI 

"/ believe it is one of 
two things. The first is their 
views on what should be 
done with the situation of 
the trade deficit. The sec- 
ond is it would be nice to 
have a President that could 
complete a sentence. Per- 
sonally, I haven' t witnessed 
this yet." 



Randy Jones 
Accounting 

Freshman, Schenectady, 
NY 

"Experience. We have 
two candidates. One is a 
war veteran, has been a U.S. 
Congressman, the Director 
of the CIA, a (/JV. Ambas- 
sador, and Vice-President 
for eight years. I have yet to 
see the qualifications of the 
other candidate." 





Michael McHale 
Political Science 
Senior, Lake Charles 

"Unfortunately, I 
think this campaign is being 
decided on non-issues. The 
American people are being 
influenced by lies and slan- 
der and the true issues are 
being ignored." 



Mel Higdon 
Medical Technology 
Sophomore, Krotz 
Springs 

"I feel the major issue 
in the presidential elections 
this time would have to be 
taxes and how to "try" to 
balance the budget." 



PAGE 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



NOVEMBER 1,1988 NOV 



NEWS 



_____ 



SP 



D 



By CHI 
Sports V 

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Le 



Career Evaluation and 
Information Center to 
appear in NSU library 



NATCHITOCHES— Dr. Ada 
Jarred, director of libraries at North- 
western State University, has an- 
nounced that a Career Evaluation and 
Information Center is being estab- 
lished at Watson Memorial Library 
with the support of an $82, 250 federal 
grant which was made available to 
NSU through the Job Training Part- 
nership Act. 

Dr. Jarred said the Career Evalu- 
ation and Information Center will be 
located on the third floor of Watson 
Memorial Library on NSU's main 
campus in Natchitoches. 

Under the provisions of the grant, 
a special staff will test and evaluate 
the vocational abilities of all Job Train- 
ing Partnership Act trainees in the 
parishes of Red River, DeSoto, and 
Natchitoches for the purpose of pro- 
viding better information to JTPA 
providers and thus reducing the drop- 
out rate for trainees in the three-parish 
area. 

Also provided for in the grant is 
the creation of a comprehensive Ca- 
reer Information Center, which will 



be open to the public from throughout 
this region. 

The grant proposal was prepared 
by Fleming A. Thomas, who was 
assisted by librarians Janet Samet, 
Thurlow Mayeaux, and Abbie Lan- 
dry. All four are members of 
Northwestem's Watson Memorial 
Library reference staff. 

Dr. Jarred stated that Northwest- 
ern is currendy in the process of 
employing the staff, and that the pro- 
gram will begin soon after the staff 
has been developed. 

Thomas, who will coordinate 
the program, is seeking vocational 
counselors with psychological and 
some psychometric experience. 

For further information on the 
new Career Evaluation and Informa- 
tion Center at Northwestern, call Flem- 
ing A. Thomas in Northwestem's 
Watson Memorial Library at (318) 
357-4574 or write Fleming A. Tho- 
mas, Coordinator, Career Evaluation 
and Information Center, Eugene P. 
Watson Memorial Library, Northwest- 
em State University, Natchitoches, 
LA, 71497. 



Individual 
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COLLECT CALLS ACCEPTED 

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loxicWiste 
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The Great American 
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This space contributed as a public service. 



ARE YOU A WINNER? 

CHECK YOUR MEAL PLAN I.D. 
NUMBER LOCATED ON THE BACK 
OF YOUR I.D. CARD AND IF ONE 
OF THE FOLLOWING NUMBERS IS 
YOURS YOU HAVE WON A FREE 
MEDIUM PIZZA FROM ITZA PIZZA. 
YOU MAY PICK UP YOUR FREE 
PIZZA COUPON BY PRESENTING 
YOUR I.D. AT THE FOODSERVICE 
OFFICE LOCATED IN THE STUDENT 
UNION. 

THIS WEEKS WINNING NUMBERS 
ARE: 

084721 029591 084341 082801 081691 
064811 069851 060771 061621 060861 

I TZ A PIZZA so a ose you ca n taste iti " 



$25,200 
PAYS FOR 
A LOT OF 
COLLEGE. 

In the Army, while 
you're training in a valu- 
able skill, you could earn 
up to $25,200 for college 
or approved vocational/ 
technical training 
through the Montgomery 
GI Bill Plus the Army 
College Fund. That's 
money that could help 
you attend just about any 
educational program you 
choose. 

Talk it over with your 
local Army Recruiter. 

Staff Sergeant Randy Leonard 
357-8469 

ARMY. 
BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 



MISS FORT POLK 
PAGEANT 

Official preliminary to the 
MISS AMERICA PAGEANT 

Must be a military dependant or on active duty 
Ages 17-26 

Scholarships Will Be Awarded! 

For more information call 
Mrs. Stanley at 535-4535 



GET READY FOR 
THE HOLIDAYS 

Guys & Gals 

Hair Salon 
The Full Service Salon 
357-5451 

Open Mon.-Fri. 9a.m. Until 
Appointments or walk-ins welcome 
NSU Student Union Building 



THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO 
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY. 

And they're both repre- 
sented by the insignia you wear 
as a member of the Army Nurse 
Corps. The caduceus on the left 
means you're part of a health care 
system in which educational and 
career advancement are the rule, 
_ not the exception. The gold bar 
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. If you're 
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713, 
Clifton, NJ 07015. Or call toll free 1-800- US A- ARMY. 

ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 






Hwy 1 By-Pass 



Natchitoches, LA 



GO 



DEMONS 



Catfish Basket 

And Medium Drink 

BUY 1 GET 1 FREE 



$AVE 
4.14 



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May not be used In conjunction with any 
other offer. Umlt 1 coupon per customer 
per visit. Expires November 7,1988 



OPEN 24 HOURS 

357-8198 



•ep 



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NA" 
>ple sig 
mural/Rec 
first 40 da 
statistics ( 
theLeisun 
week. 

Othe 
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Team Ten 
ers in the 
football w 
recorded; i 
leyball teai 
fell's voile 
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1988 NOVEMBER 1, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 5 



| SPORTS 









Demons declaw Bearkats, 49-14 



By CHRIS McGEE 
Sports Writer 

Somebody forgot to inform the 
Northwestern State Demons that they 
were going into battle against the 
nation's numero uno defensive unit. 
Sam Houston State came into Satur- 
day night' s matchup with the Demons, 
boasting the division I-AA's top- 
ranked defense, surrendering a most 
stingy average of 208 yards per game 
against opposing offenses. 

Showing blatant disregard for 
the stats, the Demons piled up 449 
yards of offensive output and pounded 
the proud Bearkat defense into obliv- 
ion, 49-14. 

If those particular numbers were 
unexpected, then so wereNSU's indi- 
vidual statistics. Demon receivers 
Floyd Turner and Mark May field each 
caught just one pass, and tight end 
Orlan Lockhart didn't even bother 
appearing. Also, Demon quarterbacks 
combined for only 10 completions, 
and the tailback combo of Kenneth 
DeWitt and Paul Frazier only ac- 
counted for 63 yards rushing. 

The peculiar abnormality of the 
Demon scheme of things was baf- 
fling, if nothing else. So, who DID 
have a big game? Well, DeWitt and 
Frazier successfully made the meta- 
morphosis to receivers and combined 
for 5 catches for 199 yards and 2 
scores. Is that big enough for you? 

Laying aside the prominent ter- 
rain covered by those two amigos, 
let's ask that question that so many 
were itching to ask. How, please tell 
us, how did the Demons manage to 
unleash the fire and brimstone of 49 
points against THE defense? Demon 
mentor Sam Goodwin offered some 
insight after the game. 

"We're just pretty dang good. 
We have so many weapons," admit- 
ted Goodwin with an expression of 
deep wonderment "We just have so 
much skill." 

Shedding further light on the 
performance, Frazier quipped, "The 
defense got an interception early and 
scored, and we moved the ball. They 



(Sam Houston) got down on them- 
selves, and we were able to move the 
ball on them." 

A pair of rather simple interpre- 
tations to a question that demands a 
rigidly complicated formula of a solu- 
tion, but maybe it was that simple for 
the Demons, who came in clicking out 
420 yards of offense a game. 
Of course, five interceptions turned in 
by the NSU defense didn't serve as a 
detriment either. 

On the game's third play, De- 
mon cornerback David Chitman 
stepped in frontof a Bart Bradley third 
and twelve pass at the 44 and sailed in 
almost unaffected for the game's first 
touchdown at the 13:29 mark in the 
opening quarter 

The Bearkats looked as if they 
would answer back on their next pos- 
session as they ran off a monotonous 
total of 13 running plays when Bra- 
dley decided to once again test the 
airwaves. Bad choic, Bart ol' boy 
because NSU's Dennis Smith was 
Johnny on the spot and confiscated 
the pass in the endzone. 

"Our defense had Five intercep- 
tions," noted Goodwin afterward. "I 
don't remember the last time we did 
that. 

The Demons then got down to 
the nitty-gritty. Scott Stoker heaved a 
32 yard strikefrom the pocket to Turner 
who brought it in at the Bearkat 47. 
One play ^ R c? Stoker hooked up with 
DeWitt for a 23 yard toss, the junior 
tailback strolled in from 4 yards out 
for a touchdown 

The Demons enjoyed defying 
the law of the number-one defense in 
the land and continued to advance the 
chains with vehement authority and a 
big-play flare. A series after Stoker 
rolled out and hit DeWitt down the 
Demon sideline for a 69 yard touch- 
down pass out of a fly pattern, the 
diminutive NSU signal-caller fired a 
pass to Frazier who toted it 60 yards, 
setting up a 1 yard scoring plunge by 
Pete Ellis. The Demons now held a 
comfortable, not to mention bewil- 
dering, 28-0 advantage. 



While the Demons excelled in 
getting the ball into the endzone, the 
NSU defense mastered the art of keep- 
ing SHSU out of it for the duration of 
the first-half. "I really thought we 
were the best defense on the field," 
proclaimed Goodwin with unfailing 
certainty. "I'm glad we were playing 
against their defense and not ours." 

The Bearkats finally tasted 
paydirt with 3:55 left in the first-half 
when Bradley found Scott Ford in the 
endzone for a 5 yard pass, capping off 
a 6 play 69 yard drive making it 28-7 
Demons. 

However, the grave had already 
been dug. The Demons came out at 
the start of the second-half to embark 
on burying the Bearkats alive. Stoker 
found Frazier once again, this time for 
a 44 yard touchdown pass to polish off 
an 8 play, 80 yard march. 

The Bearkats' next series of 
plays floundered, and SHSU was 
forced to punt back to NSU. Rusty 
Slack, who directed this particular 
drive for the Demons, tucked the ball 
away and scrambled through an empty 
hole over right tackle for a 22 yard 
pick-up. Three plays later, DeWitt 
took the batan and the ball and scur- 



Leisure Activities 
reports large numbers 



NATCHITOCHES— 5,267 
"■Psople signed-in to utilize the Intra- 
mural/Recreation building during the 
first 40 days of classes according to 
statistics compiled and released by 
the Leisure Activities Department this 
week. 

Other noteworthy stats include 
a 400% increase in participation in the 
Team Tennis tournament; 623 play- 
ers in the recently completed flag 
football with over 200 participants 
recorded; an all-time high of 37 vol- 
leyball teams scheduled to play in this 
fall's volleyball league (in 1986 there 
were 12 teams and 28 teams in 1987); 
and to date, with four of the five money 
sports already completed or under- 
way, 87 teams representing theGreeks, 
Dormitories and Independents have 
competed in the structured Intramural 
Sports Program this fall. 

The IM/REC facility, housing 
the Game Room (a popular pool hall 



and ping pong and video game hide- 
out), weight room, raquetball courts 
and quiet game area, still brings in 
crowds between 3:00 p.m. and 9:00 
p.m. Also, basketball is played on the 
53 year-old floor, which will be refin- 
ished in early December if all goes 
well. From now until November 18 
our gym as well as Prather Coliseum 
and the P.E. Majors Building will be a 
volleyball playground from 7:00 p.m. 
until 9:30 p.m. as the popular sport 
gets underway this week. 

The Co-Rec Volleyball Tourna- 
ment is scheduled to get started this 
Friday in the IM/REC Building with 
games scheduled to begin at 2:00 p.m. 
The winner of this tournament will be 
sent to Lake Charles on November 
18-19 to compete in the State Co-Rec 
IM Volleyball Tournament Entry 
deadline is 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, 
November 2. 



Half -Niter to dazzle 



NATCHITOCHES— TheLei- 
sure Activities Department at North- 
western is sponsoring another daz- 
zling special event to be held on 
Wednesday, November 2, from 8:00 
P-m. til midnight in the Intramural/ 
Recreation building on campus. 

Following the successful tradi- 
tions of the Intramural Beach Day and 
Olympics of the Mind activities, the 
First Annual Half Niter promises to 
offer a variety of experiences to inter- 
est the first semester freshmen to our 
Host eccentric college professor. 

Our hump day program begins 
With a hot dog/marshmallow roast to 
Energize everyone for the exciting 
^ening of events. Favors will be given 
^ all those who pass through the IM/ 
SEC doors and enter their five person 
^gfprn for the activities to follow. 

Novelty events include scooter 
board medley relays; baby bottle 



ried in for his third endzone invasion 
of the night. The Demons virtually 
slammed the door on SHSU at that 
point, 42-7 with 2:52 remaining in the 
third quarter. 

Goodwin then called of f the dogs 
and inserted a fresh crop of backups 
for the fourth quarter run. The subs, 
led by quarterback Andrew Roach, 
managed to break the goal-line when 
senior fullback Mike O'Neal went in 
from a yard out. 

Goodwin stated, "When we used 
our subs in the fourth, even they played 
hard. I think Sam Houston had pretty 
much quit at that time." 

The Bearkats tried to save some 
face when Rickey Thomas broke loose 
into the secondary and avoided nu- 
merous Demon defenders on his way 
to a 72 yard touchdown jaunt with 24 
seconds left in the game, finalizing 
things at 49-14, NSU. 

"They (the Bearkats) were com- 
ing off two emotional losses. We just 
caught them the same way they caught 
us last year," Goodwin said. 

Stoker used the "big" pass to pile 
up 274 yards through the air to lead the 
Demons to their seventh win against 
just one loss. 



chugging; grass sack relays; back- 
ward free throw throw contest; food 
eating spectacle; win, lose or draw 
games; and the intimate tennis ball 
pass. Teams will be awarded 1st, 2nd 
and 3rd place finish points for each 
activity and the overall team winner 
will be given prizes. 

The culminating activity of the 
evening will be the "Treasure Hunt," 
where individuals and teams will be 
guided by "clues" to discover the 
whereabouts of our hidden treasure. 
One clue that you all need to know for 
this treasure hunt is "Sometimes in 
sports the 'big hands' are considered 
the best. For this type of competition 
it would be the 'smaller ones' that I 
might suggest We in the IM Depart- 
ment really enjoy the pleasure, for it is 
very exciting watching you search 
and search for this hidden treasure." 



Typing Service 
Resumes, Theses, Term Papers and other typing done 
Professional quality at reasonable rates. We store 
documents on disk at no extra charge. Also spread- 
sheets, desktop publishing, graphics, mailing lists, and 
other computer work done. 
For the best service in town call 

TYPE MASTERS 
357-1145 




Chef Robert Short of ARA Services was honored at the 
"Chocolate Sundae" contest held in Shreveport on Oct. 23. 

Chef Short was awarded a bronze medal for his entry of an 
original dessert named Cocoa Meringue. 

We at ARA Services are very pleased with Chef Short's 
performance, especially in light of the fierce competition. Competi- 
tors come from all over the states of Louisiana and Texas, includ- 
ing Chef David Utley of Louisiana Downs and Chef Jim Johnston 
of Brookhaven Country Club, Dallas, TX 

Chef Short is currently employed at NSU as the pastry 
chef and head baker working at Iberville Dining Hall. He has held 
this position since Jan. 1988. 

Chef Short is responsible for all the delectable goodies 
found in Gretal's at the Student Union Cafeteria and will be on 
hand next Wednesday at noon with samples of his winning des- 
sert. The recipe for Cocoa Meringue will also be available. 



^avktoai 1 Cinema 
presents 




STARTS FRIDAY!] 

NOVEMBER 4 





IlillMiiiS 



MS PRODUCTION OF A PHIL JOANOU FILM U2H4TTLE AND HUM 
PHOTOGRAPHY-COLOR JORDAN CfiONENWETH, A.S.C. 
:RT BRINKMANN EXECUTIVE PRODUCER PAUL McGUINNESS 
L JOANOU A PARAMOUNT PICTURE .J^^:. 
:S S COMPACT DISCS •'j^HMi- 



ivsSnEolHB ntw Thp OHi-* Boo* ot rhe 

- UZMov* FnOMHAHMONYaOOIlS 



RESPECT COMES WITH 
THE TERRITORY 

Respect and pres- 
| tige come naturally 
| to people who 
serve as officers in 
the Army Nurse 
0)tps. 

You'll he part 
of a very special 
health care team, 
and your duties 
could range from 
serving in a high- 
tech military 

hospital to serving in a field hospital or a MASH unit 
in the United States or overseas. 

If this sounds interesting, contact an Army Nurse 
Recruiter. 

Ask Your Local Army Recruiter to Contact 
The Nurse Recruiter For You, Or Call: 
SFC E. J. King at (501) 664-4840 

ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 





AMERICAN 
V CANCER 
f SOCIETY* 

Give yourself the chance of a lifetime. 



A mammogram is a 
safe, low-dose X-ray that 
can detect breast cancer 
before there's a lump. In 
other words, it could save 
your life and your breast. 

If you're a woman 
over 35, be sure to schedule 
a mammogram. Unless 
you're still not convinced 
of its importance. 

In which case, you 
may need more than your 
breasts examined. 

Find the time. 
Have a mammogram. 



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by DDB Needham 




LUNCH BUFFET 



$2.99 

(with coupon) 

Reg. 3.29 



CALL 352-5109 for Showtimes 



1 



♦Pizza * Spaghetti 
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NIG HT ~ BU FFET 

Sun., Mon., Tues., Wed., & Thurs. 

All You Can Eat- $3.79 

No coupon needed 

Pizza Delivery 
357-1135 
We deliver from lla.m.-elose 
NSU Discount with ID on dine-in 
or take out only 



PAGE 6 



CURRENT SAUCE 



NOVEMBER 1, K 



CAMPUS LINE 



Bush Rally 

On Thursday, November 3, a 
rally for presidential canddate George 
Bush will be held in the auditorium of 
Kyser Hall, Room 142. The guest 
speaker at the rally will be Congress- 
man Jim McCrery (R) from Shre- 
veport. The rally is sponsored by 
College Republicans. 

Baptist Student Union 

The Baptist Student Union 
(BSU) extends an open invitation to 
all Northwestern Students to come to 
the Baptist Student Center, 810 Col- 
lege Avenue, across from Watson 
Library and to become involved in an 
organization that could make a differ- 
ence in your life. 

The following activities happen 
weekly: Monday at 6:30 p.m. is family 
night, Tuesday at 6 p.m. is Bible Study, 
Wednesday from 1 1 a.m.-12:20 p.m. 
is Noon-Encounter for all students, 
faculty, and staff for 50 cents, and 
Wednesday at 6 p.m. is Vespers, a 
mini-worship service, Thursday at 6 
p.m. in T.N.T., a time of fun, food, and 
fellowship. 

The Northwestern BSU is sup- 
ported by the Louisiana Baptist Con- 
vention and 130 churches in DeSoto, 
Red River , Sabine, North Sabine, and 
Natchitoches associations. Myra 
Gulledge serves as the BSU Director. 

The Baptist Student Union is 
open Monday through Friday from 8 
a.m. until 10 p.m. and Saturdays from 
12 noon until 8 p.m. Sundays, the 
BSU is open from 1:30 pjn. until 5:30 
p.m. Students are invited to use our 
facilities for cooking, relaxing, or 
studying. Brian Sanders and Milton 
Vining, Jr. serve as live-in hosts. 

Rape Seminar 

A presentation called "Date Rape- 
What to Do About It" will be held on 
Thursday, November 10, at 1 1 a.m. in 
the Home Economics Building, Room 
106. Joyce Segelhorst from the YWCA 
Rape Crisis Center in Shreveport will 
talk about what a person goes through 
if she's been raped, what to do is you or 
someone you know has been raped, and 
how to prevent rape. The seminar is 
sponsored by the Student Member 
Section, Louisiana Home Economics 
Association and is open to the public. 
Formoreinformation.contactDr. Sally 
Hunt at 357-5587. 

Wesley Foundation 

If you haven't visited the Wesley 
Foundation yet, you are really miss- 
ing out on some great fun and great 
people. Wesley's Monday Night 
Movies are hits. So far, they've shown 
Burglar , My Demon Lover , The Un- 
touchables, and others. Join them 
Mondays at 7:30 and find out what's 
next. 

The Tuesday luncheons have 
gone up from 500 to 750, but that's 
still a great price for a home-cooked 
meal. Lunch is served from 11:30 to 
12:30 every Tuesday. 

On Wednesday nights, Wesley 
members go down to the First United 
Methodist Church and take out their 
frustrations on the volleyball court. 
They also play basketball and roller- 
skate. 

Sunday brings time for fellow- 
ship with a chapel service at 5 fol- 
lowed by a dinner. 

Even if you just want a quiet 
place to study, Wesley's the place for 
you! Wesley's hours are 8 a.m.-9 
p.m. Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 
Friday, and 4 p.m. -9 p.m. Sunday. 

Free Tutoring 

NSU Student Services offers free 
tutoring in most subject areas Mon- 
day through Friday from 8 a.m. 
through 4:30 p.m. in room 215 A in 
Watson Memorial Library. 

Rowing Team 

Anyone interested in the North- 
western Rowing Team should go to 
practices Monday through Friday from 
5 to 6 p.m. at Chaplin's Lake. Anyone 
unable to make practice can call 357- 
5971. 

German Club 

Northwestem's German Club, 
Budes Duetsch Lernen und Studiern, 
will hold a meeting Wednesday, 
November 2, at 7 p.m. in Room 217 
Russell Hall. Everyone is welcome. 

LOB 

The deadline to enter into the Miss 
Lady of the Bracelet Pageant is today 
at 5 p.m. All entries must be turned 
into room 214 in the Student Union. 



BSU Lunch 

The Baptist Student Union is 
holding a Polynesian Lunch on Tues- 
day, November 8, from 1 1:30 a.m. to 
1 p.m. Everyone is invited and take- 
out is available. The lunch is spon- 
sored by the Student Personnel Asso- 
ciation. 



Panhellenic 

Panhellenic Semi-formal will be 
Thursday, Nov. 10. Anyone wishing 
to purchase tickets for $2 per couple 
and $1 .50 per single may contact any 
Panhellenic representative. 



Sigma Delta Chi 

The Society for Professional 
Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi, will hold 
their next meeting on Thursday, 
November 3, at 1 1 a.m. in Kyser Hall 
Room 106. All members are urged to 
attend; plans for the freshman record 
will be discussed. 

Library Orientation 

Make-up sessions for Freshman 
Library Orientation has been resched- 
uled for Tuesday, November 1, at 7 
p.m. Meet in the Reference Room of 
Watson Library. 



Potpourri 

Our next yearbook deadline is 
today, and guess what, you missed it. 
However, for those of you who didn't 
get to share in the fun, you can come 
to our next mandatory meeting on 
Thursday, November 3, at 11 a.m. in 
225 Kyser. 

Freshman Orientation 

If you missed the sign-up for the 
Institutional Research Survey held at 
Freshman Orientation last week, re- 
port to 104 Kyser Hall to sign up for 
your survey time. 



Freshmen 

The freshman class will be host- 
ing a fall dance for all freshmen from 
8 p.m. to midnight on November 16 at 
the Rec. Complex. A theme for the 
dance will be announced later. 



Parking 

New hours for open zones for 
parking will be 3 p.m. through 7 a.m. 
Open zones for parking do not include 
spaces designated for handicapped 
loading zones and 15 minute parking. 

Due to the increasing problem of 
speeding on campus, University Po- 
lice will have areas on campus under 
radar protection. 



CODOFIL 

The Council for the Develop- 
ment of French in Louisiana is organ- 
izing its 20th Anniversary Reunion in 
the historical city of Natchitoches on 
Saturday, November 5, 1988. All past 
participants in CODOFIL's study and 
exchange programs since 1968 and 
particularly all scholarship recipients, 
are invited to attend this free day of 
activities and fun. Come meet the 
people you traveled with as well as 
various officials from Belgium, 
France, Quebec and New Brunswick 
on Saturday, November 5, at North- 
western State University. 

For more information or regis- 
tration call CODOFIL at (318) 265- 
5810. 

Merci beaucoup! 



Talent Show 

The Pan-Hellenic Council will 
be presenting "Showtime at North- 
western," a talent show featuring 
individuals with a variety of talent on 
Tuesday, November 3, at 7:30 p.m. in 
Kyser Auditorium. Anyone interested 
please contact Lockey Whitaker at 
357-6347 or any Greek on the Coun- 
cil. Entry fee is $5 for groups and $3 
for individuals. Prizes will include 
S25 and trophies for first, second, and 
third place. Admission is $1. 



Phi Mu 

Phi Mu would like to recognize 
and congratulate its many members 
who have represented Northwestern 
this semester. 

Homecoming Court: Cindy 
Bethel, Liz Bonnette, Melody Smith, 
and Kim Wilson. 

State Fair Court: Dayna Dooley, 
Beth Eitel, Lisa Lukowski, Holly 
Methvin, and Queen Ann Marie Sch- 
neider. 

Miss NSU: Melissa Canales. 
Congratulations! 



Argus 

The Argus staff will mee 
Thursday, Nov. 3 at 3:30 p.m. ii 
Argus office, Room 3 16A, Kyser 
There will be discussion on the 
missions received from the fall i 
test and preparation for forwar 
them to the faculty judges. Also, 
will be discussion on the spring agj 
and a time will be decided on to) 
a yearbook picture. 
Attendance is necessary to 
credit for serving on the staf 
semester. If anyone has any quesh a 
or time conflicts, contact Gy^l 
Ingram as soon as possible. 



Phi Beta Lambda 

The following members will be 
going to the National Fall Leadership 
Conference in Mobile, Alabama: 
Margaret Kilcoyne, sponsor, Rhonda 
Nelms, president; Susan Smith, par- 
limentarian and Angela Maggiore, 
secretary. The conference will be held 
Nov. 4-6. The next meeting will be 
Novermber. All members please at- 
tend. 



AIDS 

There will be an AIDS Aware- 
ness Seminar Tuesday, Nov. 1 at 7 
p.m. in the Student Union Ballroom. 

Admission is free. 



Mid-Term Grades 

Mid-term grades will be 
out on Wednesday, Thursday 
Friday, November 2-4, 1988, 
Student Support Services office, 
104 Kyser, from 9 a.m. until 4 
each day. I.D. will be required 



FCS 

The Fellowship of Christ 
Students will be meeting 
Wednesday from 7 p.m. til 8:3( Ktl 
in Rm. 320 of the Student ll jTI 
Everyone is welcome and encoil I w 
to attend. 



U I wasn't rubbing 
it in-I just wanted 
Eddie to know 
the score of 
last nights garnet 




Go ahead and gloat. You can 
rub it in all the way to Chicago 
with AT&T Long Distance Service. 
Besides, your best friend Eddie 
was the one who said vour team 
could never win three straight. 

So give him a call It costs a 
lot less than you think to let him 
know who's headed for the Playoffs. 
Reach out and touch someone® 

If youd like to know more about 
AT&T products and services, like 
International Calling and the AT&T 
Card, call us at 1 800 222-0300. 



AT&T 

The right choice. 



/ill meet 
3 p.m. in 
i.Kyserl 
1 on the ( 
the fall \ 
r forwarl 
s. Also, tj 
spring agl 
led on tot 





NOVEMBER 8, 1988 NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 

OF LOUISIANA 



<§J83© 



VOL 77, NO. 15 




ry to red 
the staff! 



any quesri 
ntact 
ible. 



will be 
rhursda 
\, 1988, 1 
;s office,! 
n. until 4| 
required! 



of Christ 
neeting i 
m. til 8:3i 
student I 
and encoi 



^ Straight from Montreal 

Ballet company 
featured at NSU 



m 

£. 

n 

a 
n 

offs. 

it 

;e 

[&T 



| NORTH WESTERN — The 

it de Montreal Eddy Toussaint 
! Montreal in Quebec, Canada, 
be featured in a Cultural Events 
s performance Thursday, No- 
ler 10, at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts 
torium of the A.A. Fredericks 
ive and Performing Arts Center 
rthwestem State University. 
The world-famous ballet com- 
which combines classical and 
;m dance styles, will appear at 
western with the support of a 
from the Louisiana Arts Council 
ne National Endowments for the 



In addition to Thursday night's 
rmance, the company's ballet 
ess, Camilla Malashenko, will 
ict a special master class for 
students at Northwestern and 
uisiana School for the Math, 
ice, and the Arts on Wednesday, 
mber 9, at 7 p.m. in the dance 
of the Louisiana School on the 
campus. 

Tickets for Thursday night's 
lance are $8 for adults and $5 
dents. They may be reserved at 
x officer by calling the Depart- 
H of Music and Theatre Arts at 
B) 357-4522. NSU and Louisiana 
bol students will be admitted free 
le concert, but must obtain a ticket 
i presentation of student identifi- 
an card, either at the box officer 
light of the performance or during 
reek of November 7 at the Music 
fcheatre Arts office. 
The scheduled program for the 
HmanceatNorthwestern includes 
works choreographed by Eddy 
isaint, the founder and artistic 
tor of the ballet company. The 
ices to be performed are "Alexis le 
<teur" (which premiered in 1978), 
►uvenance" (1982), "Cantates" 
8), and "Concerto en Mouve- 
r (1984). 

The 23 -member ballet 
>any 's stars are Anik Bissonnetle 



and Louis Robitalle. Principals are 
Denis Dulude, Brigitte Valette, and 
Mario Thibodeau. Lorraine Chapman 
and Helene Dion willappear as solo- 
ists. 

Since its founding in 1974, the 
Ballet de Montreal Eddy Toussaint 
has continued to represent Quebec 
throughout the world, earning an inter- 
national reputation for its original style 
and rare dynamism. 

While respecting the conven- 
tions of classical ballet, Toussaint has 
created an energetic, dynamic com- 
pany that can take in its stride the most 
modern interpretations and forms of 
expression. 

The Ballet de Montreal Eddy 
Toussaint and its company of dancers 
have inspired the creation of some 60 
ballets which form its permanent 
repertoire. 

Thecompany, which drew inter- 
national attention with its perform- 
ance in the closing ceremonies of the 
1976 Summer Olympic Games in 
Montreal, has performed in numerous 
countries, including Canada, the 
United States, France, Great Britain, 
Belgium, Italy, Mexico, Colombia, 
Haiti, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Ecua- 
dor, Finland, and Australia. 

In addition to participating in 
more than 13 regular seasons at 
Montreal's Place des Arts, the com- 
pany has to its credit hours of per- 
formance in Quebec, the United States, 
Central and South America, as well as 
European tours. 

The company has taken part in 
many festivals and official opening 
ceremonies and has been featured on 
several television broadcasts and vari- 
ous opera, theatre, and fdm produc- 
tions. 

For more information on the 
Thursday, November 7, performance 
of the Ballet de Montreal Eddy Tous- 
saint, call tony Smith in the Depart- 
ment of Music and Theatre Arts at 
(318) 357-4522. 




The Ballet de Montreal Eddy Toussaint performs Mozart's "Requiem." The internationally-acclaimed modern 
dance troupe will perform four dances at NSU on Thursday, November 10, at 8 p.m. in the A. A. Fredericks Fine 
Arts Auditorium. 

Demons steaming with 8-1 record 



By CHRIS McGEE 
Sports Writer 

Ever since the postseason play- 
offs were initiated onto the division I- 
AA football scene over a decade ago, 
the Northwestern State Demons have 
been searching like a mad scientist to 
discover a formula to bust into the 
playoff scenario. 

With Saturday's 25-17 
shellshocker over the University of 
North Texas Eagles in Denton, Texas, 
the Demons may very well have come 
up with a ticket out of the lab. 

"It would be hard to keep us out 
of the playoffs," voiced NSU head, 
coach Sam Goodwin following his 
team's monumental victory, one that 
assures the Demons of no worse than 
a second-place conference finish. "I'd 
be shocked if they didn't take two 
from the best I-AA conference." 

For all practical purposes, any 
committee would be fairly hard- 
pressed to pass up the Demons. Of 
course, if the Demons can beat Stephen 



F. Austin in a couple of weeks, it 
won't be the NCAA's prerogative to 
do so. 

Look at the facts. The Demons 
have torn through their conference 
slate on the way to seven consecutive 
v ictories. They have utterly dismem- 
bered three opponents in the process: 
East Texas State- 41-13, Southwest 
Texas State- 49-21 , and Sam Houston 
State- 49-14. 

The Demons completely domi- 
nated McNeese State and Northeast 
Louisiana in the first-half before set- 
tling for wins over the two by 25-20 
and 27-15, respectively. And, of 
course, NSU polished of f North Texas 
25-17 in their own backyard. This is 
the same North Texas that defeated 
Southwest Conference affiliate Texas 
Tech 29-24, nearly upset the fabled 
Texas Longhoms before losing 27- 
24, and claimed the number one spot 
in division I-AA for six whole weeks. 

The Demons, with all their offen- 
sive gusto and defensive expertise, 



are now settling into a scary groove. 
Scary for their opponents. Boy, and 

just imagine, if the Demons ever put 
together two halves of dictatorial rule 
instead of just one, then Michael 
Jackson wouldn'treally know the true 
meaning of BAD! 

The Demons are sitting pretty and 
are an almost cinch to crash the 
postseason gala. No confusing 
tiebreakers, no undiscernible compu- 
tations, no relying on the outcomes of 
other games. Simply put, to beat 
Stephen F. Austin in two weeks is to 
take the SLC crown outright and get 
an automatic bid to the playoffs. A 
loss and the Demons do no worse than 
second. 

NSU takes a one- week sabbatical 
from conference action this week to 
travel to Jackson, Mississippi to face 
head coach W.C. Gorden's Jackson 
State Tigers. Last year, the Demons 
rallied behind the heroics of third- 
string quarterback Gilbert Galloway 
to paste the Tigers 26-24 in Turpin 



Stadium in the first ever meeting be- 
tween the two teams. This year's 
game could be just as close as Jackson 
State was ranked thirteenth in last 
week's poll. It could be a surprise, 
especially if the Demons are looking 
ahead. 

The Tigers incurred the loss of 12 
starters from last year's squad that 
went 8-3-1, but of 10 returning start- 
ers, runningback Lewis Tillman, the 
Tigers' main man, is truly the biggest 
Lastseason, Tillman rambled for 1474 
yards rushing and 10 touchdowns. 

The big name on defense for 
Jackson State is that of linebacker 
Darion Conner. A year ago, Conner 
left his brand on many a ball carrier. 
Conner notched 93 tackles and 8 sacks 
in 1987. 

The Demons can' t afford to look to 
far ahead as they will have their hands 
full with these talented bunch of Ti- 
gers. Kickoff is set for 7:30 p.m. in 
Mississippi Veterans Memorial Sta- 
dium this Saturday night. 



laley's work garners promotion 



HANNON J. GREER 
Writer 

Mrs. Marilyn Haley has been 
ec ted member of Northwestern ' s 
y for over two years. Mrs. Haley 
appointed to the position of 
dinator of Student Employment 
gust 1988. 

Originally a recruiter/coun- 
in the Admissions Office, Mrs. 
f now handles many aspects of 
nt employment. The time sheets 
imed in to her office and she 
3 counseling if there are prob- 



Mrs. Haley can place a stu- 
(vorker in a different department 
ark conflicts with classes. Stu- 
workers' grades are checked 
een semesters by the Student 
loyment Office. Also, applica- 
for employment may be picked 
her office. 

The Student Employment 
e, located in Room 222A Stu- 
Union, was created this semester 
use the number of student work- 
is greatly increased. It was origi- 
handled through the Financial 
)ffice. 

Mrs. Haley said that the 
;e has been helpful since student 
ers now have better access to 
mation they need. She added, 
want you to know that we care 
tyou." 

Originally from New Roads, 



La., Mrs. Haley received her Liberal 
Arts degree from Ambassador Col- 
lege in Pasadena, Ca. She is married 
to Mr. James Haley, Vice-President 
of University Affairs at Northwest- 
ern. They have four children; one 
married son, two sons who are stu- 
dents at NSU, and a daughter who is a 
junior at Natchitoches Central High 
School. 

There are two types of em- 
ploymentprograms available atNSU. 
College Work Study is based on fi- 
nancial need and the Financial Aid 
Office determ ines a student' s eligibil- 
ity for it Freshmen recipientsjnust 
maintain a 1.75 grade point average 
their first semester in order to receive 
it their second semester. Sophomores, 
juniors and seniors must keep a 2.0 
GPA. 

The Work Service Award is 
given only to incoming freshmen who 
have scored high on their ACT. This 
semester's freshmen recipients had to 
have scored a 23 on the ACT. In order 
to receive the Work Service Award 
the second semester, the student must 
have a 2.5 GPA the first semester. 

Workers are paid every four 
weeks and pick up their checks from 
the department in which they work. 
Most students work 38 hours a month. 
Each worker has a supervisor. 

Mrs. Haley said that it is nec- 
essary that all students fill out an 
application for each semester. Appli- 





Marilyn Haley 



cations are available at her office at 
222A Student Union. 

At the end of this semester, 
every supervisor will do an evaluation 
of each student worker. This evalu- 
ation will be placed in a file at the 
Student Employment Office should a 
student give Northwestern as a refer- 
ence on a job application. 



Mrs. Haley explained that the 
final pay period will be five weeks 
long and time sheets will be due on 
Wednesday, December 14, the last 
test day. Envelopes will accompany 
that final time sheet so that the final 
check can be mailed to the student. 
The checks will be mailed on Friday , 
December 16, 1988. 



Payne, Slade play 
Romeo and Juliet 



By CAROLINE WARD 
Staff Writer 

Recently the Louisiana Reper- 
tory Theatre presented several per- 
formances of Romeo and Juliet as part 
of its Fall 1988 season. Romeo was 
portrayed by Gregory Payne, while 
Amy Slade played the role of Juliet. 
One interesting thing about this pair is 
that they played the same roles to- 
gether back when they were attending 
Berea College in Kentucky. 

One of the main differences in 
their performance then and their per- 
formance now is the atmosphere in 
which the two productions were set. 
Their director in Kentucky wished to 
put special emphasis on the political 
strife that exists within the play. For 
this reason he changed the setting of 
the play to Chicago in the 1920's and 
dropped the iambic pentameter in 
which the dialogue was originally 
written. 

According to Payne this politi- 
cal strife between the families is a 
main part of the show. He comments, 
"We tried to accent that [political 
strife] again this time. It is a key point 
to the show." Payne also feels that 
doing the play with the dialogue in 
iambic pentameter makes it easier for 
the actors to remember their lines. "It 



is like doing an entirely differentshow. 
It just helps you unwind. It is surpris- 
ing how much recall you get in iambic 
pentameter," he says. 

Payne and Slade also expressed 
their views concerning the reactions 
of different audiences. 'The first few 
scenes really sets the relationship 
between the actors and the audience," 
Payne comments. Slade says, "When 
you are waiting to go on, as soon as 
someone comes off stage you here 
'what's the house like?', 'how are 
they picking up jokes?'" 

Crowd reaction has a lot of in- 
fluence over the performance of ac- 
tors. It can sometimes make the dif- 
ference between a smooth perform- 
ance and one that is flawed. "I think 
that is something that we have brought 
to the audiences down here - a realiza- 
tion that live performances depend 
every bit as much on the audience as 
what is going on on stage. They can 
set the performance from their seats," 
says Payne. 

Since they have been here at 
Northwestern, the actors have per- 
formed for a variety of audiences. 
Slade seems to prefer performing to 

Theatre. ..continued 
on page 4 



I 



PAGE 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



NOVEMBER 8, 1988 




Pledge period enhances sisterhood/ brotherhood 



Greek organizations offer great college experience 



BY ELIZABETH McDAVID 
Staff Writer 

Northwestern State University's 
Greek organizations add a needed 
feature to the facade of activities on 
campus. However, before becoming 
an initiated member, one must experi- 
ence being a pledge. As with being a 
freshman in high school or college, 
this title makes one special. 

After all the glitter of Rush has 
faded, the rushees can accept a bid to 
pledge a fraternity or sorority. A 
pledge may drop, or quit, at any time 
before initiation. 

A pledge program is designed to 
educate future members about the 
fraternity or sorority. "Our pledge 
program is a training period where 
pledges find out the history and what 
is expected of them as a S igma Kappa. 
It is a time where they grow and form 
a special group. I loved being a pledge. 
It's a chance where you put in a lot and 
receive a lot," said Sigma Kappa's 
pledge trainer Karen Cresap. 

Amanda Ridley, the vice-presi- 
dent of Sigma Kappa's pledge class, 



said, "Being a pledge is fun because it 
is the beginning of your life in a soror- 
ity. One day I will be able to fondly 
look back and laugh." 

According to Tri-Sigma's 
pledge trainer Gretchen Giering, Tri- 
Sigma's pledge program is designed 
to build a solid foundation so that a 
pledge may become a knowledgeable 
member and develop the friendships 
with sisters that will last a lifetime. 

"I lovebeingaTri-Sigma pledge 
because you become part of a big 
loving group. It helps you become 
involved and you take part in a large 
number of activities. I have found so 
many new friends that I may not have 
been able to meet otherwise," said 
Nicole Tujaque, a Tri-Sigma pledge. 

According to Phi Mu active 
Chrissy Dunavent, the Big Sis-Lil Sis 
program plays an important role in 
making the pledges feel comfortable 
with the school as well as the sorority 
during their pledge period. 



"I was scared as a pledge but if 
I had any problem I could always go to 
my Big Sis. There's a extra special initiates 



friendship with your Big Sis and you 
always look up to her. Being a Big Sis 
helps you teach your Lil Sis about the 
sorority. I see a lot of myself in my Lil 
Sis," Dunavent said. 

"The Big Brother program 
shows a pledge the ropes of the frater- 
nity. He teaches the pledge about 
brotherhood which is what our frater- 
nity is all about It is an honor to 
teach," said David Ellis, a sophomore 
active of Tau Kappa Epsilon. 

"A pledge program helps 
pledges get to know their brothers. 
We try to help pledges make good 
grades. Grades come first If and when 
a pledge becomes an active, we want 
them to be an 'active active,' on 
campus as well as in the fraternity," 
said Jason Labbe, a sophomore active 
of Kappa Sigma fraternity. 

While physical hazing seems to 
be a thing of the past, some of the 
fraternities make their pledges come 
up to the fraternity houses and clean 
for an hour in the morning. Tests are 
also part of being a pledge that they 
are required to pass before they can be 



Besides learning about the indi- 
vidual fraternity or sorority and Greek 
life, academics here at Northwestern 
take a very important role in a pledges 
life Some Greeks have required study 
hours at the library while others be- 
lieve in independent study hours. 

"Being a Kappa Alpha pledge is 
the best way to meet people while still 
trying to pass college," commented 
Ken Boudreau. 

Some pledges must drop their 
pledge programs for a variety of rea- 
sons. According to Kappa Sigma 
Labbe, some pledges drop because of 
financial reasons or problemsatschool 
or at home. However, all pledges who 
are initiated agree that becoming an 
active of a Greek organization was 
one of the best choices that they ever 
made. 

"Being a pledge for a semester 
gives you life experiences that you'll 
never forget" said Kappa Alpha 
pledge Damon Daigle. 



YOU QUALIFY FUR 
INSTANT CREDIT! 



Activities board offers Las Vegas Night 

NORTH WESTERN-The S tudent Activities Board at Northwestern is sponsoring Las Vegas Night to be held on 
Thursday, November 17 from 7 to 10 p.m. in the Student Union Ballroom. 

This event will be the first of many Las Vegas Nights to hit Natchitoches and Northwestern. Las Vegas Night will 
provide quality entertainmentbeginning with the high stepping, high kicking danceline girls of Northwestern. Next will 
be featured comedian Henry Cho with Las Vegas excitement being the main attraction. 

There are 22 stations to be played during the night There will be three crap tables, six blackjack tables, three poker 
tables, three seven card stud tables, three gut tables, 3 over and under and one big wheel. 

Admission is $3 a couple and $2 per person. Everyone is encouraged to come and enjoy all the tun and win great 
quality prizes. In conjunction with Las Vegas Night ARA will raffle away a new VCR. 

Bring a date and play the high stakes at Las Vegas Night Thursday, November 17. 



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NOVEMBER 8, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 3 



EDITORIAL 



Attendance policy bothers writer 

By BRAD BODENHEIMER 

Staff Writer 

Things sure didn't turn out the way I though they would. I mean, I always equated college with freedom, 
didn't you? Of course, we have more freedom here than we did at home, but that parent-figure is still present, 
whether you know it or not. 

Who used to wake you in the morning and make you go to school? Mom or Dad, right? So who does this 
now? No one, you say? Aaahhh, but you're wrong! While there is no physical being to actually get you out 
of bed, there is that little attendance policy to make you go to class. 

Let's stop right here for a minute and let me ask you this: how many of us are being taken advantage of 
by this policy? How many of us actually know our rights and what the policy actually is? For example, to start 
with, did you know that the university itself does not require students to go to class? According to Dr. Edward 
Graham, Vice-President of Academic Affairs, the attendance policy is there for possible use by individual 
instructors. Of course, we all know that the policy only applies to classes numbered 2999 or below. 

Now let's look at the facts: (a) students can miss only 10% of the total class meetings for the semester, 
four MWF classes or two TR classes (unexcused absences), and still be in good standing in the class; (b) this 
10% can be adjusted to allow more absences, but not fewer; (c) an instructor does not have to drop you if you 
exceed this number; it is only legal for him to do so; (d) if you are dropped from a class, it still must be approved 
by the university. You cannot be kicked out of a class due to lack of attendance! (e) lastly, only if you are failing 
a class when you are dropped will you receive a grade of F. If you are passing, you will receive an X, which 
is not counted against your G.P.A. 

All these facts should be irrelevant, though, for "adult" students should not be told that they have to go 
toclass. Who's paying for your education, anyway? Unless you're a freshman (new topic — coming soon! ), you 
are! That means it is you who loses, both academically and financially, if you don't go to class. But you should 
be able to make that decision, not the faculty. 

Dr. Graham, who sounded like he's on the students' side, so don't be upset with him) said the reason the 
attendance policy is enforced is that many students are not yet responsible, so the policy forces them to go to 
class. He also said that about 90% of all F's are due to lack of attendance. There are very few "earned" F's. 
Thus, the policy cuts down on F's, benefiting the student. Now, I'm not going to contest the fact that the policy 
is good for the students' grades, but who has the right to tell students what to do and when to do it? No one, 
at least not in America! 

But what about those individuals who don't have to attend a class every day in order to pass it, or even 
to get an A in it? If they can't get any better, why should they be required to go to the class? Many times, these 
students, as well as others, have things to do for other classes and are forced to weigh these against missing 
another class. No one should be penalized for making A's. Rather, they should be rewarded by being allowed 
to miss a class and catch up on some of the sleep they lose while making those A's. 

The faculty, according to Dr. Graham, uses the argument that A students would set a bad example by not 
showing up for class. As I'm sure you all know, this is simply not the way it is. I'm not looking for a leader 
to follow, are you? (College Republicans and Young Democrats, please don't answer that!) I couldn't care less 
who shows up for class and who doesn't. Just because a student makes good grades does not make him respon- 
sible to uphold a "strong moral character" for others to imitate. 

Ideally, there should be no attendance policy and students only lose what they miss that day. However, 
this m ight be a little too much to ask for right now. I still believe that first semester freshman should be required 
to attend class, regardless of their ACT score or how many scholarships they have. After they see exactly how 
difficult the classes are, they will be able to better determine if they should go to class. 

Some instructors already have the right idea for a solution. They make attendance a certain percentage 
of the students' grades. At least, student will be able to make their own decisions without fear of losing credit 
for the course. 

Honor student should also be exempt from the policy. If the student can carry a 4.0 without going to class, 
obviously the class is not teaching him or her anything. Especially in 2999 classes or below, where the material 
doesn't move along fast enough for honor students, they should not have to waste their precious time in class. 
Most A students will go to class most of the time, anyway; that's why they're A students. 

What it all comes down to is this: the faculty wants to make students go to class because they think students 
are not responsible enough to do so on their own. Students think they're responsible enough and want to make 
themselves go to class. So who's right? Well, sometimes the faculty is, sometimes the students are. Maybe this 
old saying will let us know: "You can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar." 



Students speak: New Vic sick 



Dear Editor, 

We are writing to you about the 
atrocity we all saw at the last home 
football game: the new Demon mas- 
cot costume. Not only does it not 
show NSU's colors (come on guys, 
maroon and grey?), but it looks like 
the result of a genetic experiment gone 
awry. 

It used to be that NSU got rec- 



ognition for its mascot, the old 
"loveable" purple-clad Vic. The 
Demons are now 8- 1 and on their way 
to the playoffs and now have a mascot 
that best not be mentioned. Instead of 
being Vic, his name should be "sick." 

Why do we have this new 
mascot? We understood updating 
NSU's look to match its new image, 
but instead of taking a step forward 



we've been pushed two steps back. A 
couple of junior high cheerleaders 
could have done a better job making a 
costume. 

Let the student body decide if 
we like this new "sick" Vic. We know 
the old costume can still be used. Why 
not use it until a suitable new costume 
can be found? In the meantine, let's 
pray we can get a refund on this one. 





D On,,/?. dK^rLn I .iL^Oc. ^ 



***** . d^^C^ 




V^oc^' (M 





ILw (Lost 










though Sauce 

/Ttag^Jv^^Z&ir-a , staffers have 

signed their 
names. 



Editor's Note: 
This letter ex- 
presses the views 
many stu* 
ients on campus 
who dislike the 
new costume for 
Vic the Demon. 
It does not rep- 
resent the offi- 
:ial opinion of 
the Current 
Sauce, even 



NEWS AT SIX 




... AND IN * SURPRISING* UpSET, 
MJKE DUfcMUS ANl> Q&I&C BUSK BoTrt 
lOVr TO EVAN-rAOUSe IN totem's 

eiec-HoN . A& His First office 
putv , e\/AM- mouse' hiss ab^ushcd 
<WXlSeT«AP3 as his Ro-UFe stajud. 




Current Quotes 



What do you think of 
Vic's new costume? 



Current Sauce 



The Current Sauce's published weekly during the 
Jail and spring semesters by the students of Northwest- 
ern State University of Louisiana, tt is not associated 
with any of the University's departments and ie fi- 
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The Current Sauce is based to the Office, of 
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The mailing address for the Current Sauced P.O. 
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The deadline for all advertisement and copy is 3 
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SONYARIGAUD 




Editor 




MICHELLEWEEGO 




Managing Editor 


MTNDY BECK BRAD BODENHEIMER SHANNON BOUFFANIE 


BETH BOWMAN 


DeANNA COCHRAN SHANNON J. GREER 


H. SCOTT JOLLEY 


LAURIE LcBLANC ELIZABETH McDAVID 


CHRIS McGEE 


BRIAN McPHE ARSON ANNE MILLER 




CAROLINE WARD 




Staff Writers 


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Fall '88 





Chuck Michael 
Business Administration 
Sophomore, Baton Rouge 

"I think it looks pretty 
goofy. You can' t really tell 
if it's a demon or not!" 



Greg Smith 
Agriculture 

Freshman, New Orleans 

"I feel they should go 
backtotheoldVic. The new 
costume looks like a cross 
breed between a demon and 
Frankenstein. Unless they 
go back to the old costume, 
keep Vic in the Field 
House." 





Jeff Richard 
Journalism 
Junior, Baton Rouge 

"Vic needed a new cos- 
tume, but it should have been 
identical to his old one. He 
bears strong resemblance to 
the Elephant Man now." 



Janelle Ainsworth 
Advertising Design 
Freshman, New Orleans 

"V m not too impressed 
with Vic's costume. I've 
never heard of a 'cute' 
demon. Hedoesn' tevenlook 
the least bit intimidating! 
He's sorta wimpy looking!" 



■ ' 



PAGE 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



NOVEMBER 8, 1988 



NEWS 

Fun and games 



Half-Niter erupts 



What are the three biggest lies in the w orld? 



NORTHWESTERN— The 
first annual Leisure Activities Half- 
Niter erupted on Wednesday , Novem- 
ber 2, with a massive hot dog and 
marshmallow roast causing a chain 
reaction of excitement that bubbled 
over into a night of fun and games. 

Over 300 students, faculty and 
staff comprised eighteen teams that 
participated in a variety of novelty 
j games. Nuthin' Fancy rolled their way 
to victory in the first event of the 
! evening, the Scooter Board Medley 
Race. In the Baby Bottle Coke Chug, 
[ the Players sucked their way to a first 
j place win, and a tie for first place with 
j Nuthin' Fancy in the overall point 
I standings. In the third event, Win, 
Lose, or Draw, Clueless moved into 
: first place by solving seven pictures in 
90 seconds. 

Next was the grass sack relay, 
: which was won by Bad Ass, putting 
them into first place, and the next two 
: events, backwards free-throw and 
tennis ball pass, were won by Troop 
One putting them in second place, 
trailing Bad Ass by only one point. 
; This set the stage for a dramatic end- 
: ing with only one event left, the Food 
Eating Contest 

The Food eating Contest had a 
sour beginning and a dry end, with 
lots of sweetness in-between. The first 
member of each team had to eat a 
lemon, the second member had to 
blow a bubble after sucking through a 
blow pop, the third member had to eat 
a huge dill pickle. The fourth member 
had to eat a delicious pecan pie topped 
with whipped cream, and Uie last 
member had tochokedown four crack- 
ers filled with chunky peanut butter. 



And, as if this weren't hard enough, 
they then had to whistle over a crowd 
of 300 screaming spectators. Bad Ass 
and their cast iron stomachs prevailed 
victors of the evening after whistling 
Dixie before anyone else. 

Members of the winning team, 
Bad Ass, were: Doug Gann, Aubrey 
Knieht, Jenni Evans, Tony Means and 
Chris Vilar. 

As the last event neared, the 
treasure seekers anxiously awai ted the 
final three clues. Anticipation grew as 
each clue was about to be read. With 
only one clue left, the Kappa Moos (a 
team comprised of KA's and Phi 
Mu's), lead by their leader Brett Har- 
ris, found the treasure in plain sight. 
They filled their "little hands" with a 
"keg of 'lite' ice cream." The Kappa 
Moos were so happy their Thursday 
was filled with "spirits." 

Co-Rec Volleyball was held on 
Saturday, November 5 with teams 
competing for the opportunity to rep- 
resent NSU at the State Intramural 
Co-Rec Volleyball Tournament in 
Lake Charles. Results were not avail- 
able at press time. 

The next Leisure Activities 
Special Event will be the Volleyball 
Challenge. A team may consist of any 
six students, staff, or faculty. Each 
member will pay a $1 entry fee, with 
the winning team receiving $50 in 
cash and the second place team get- 
ting $25. The sign-up deadline for all 
teams is Wednesday, November 11. 
The tournament draw will be held at 4 
p.m. in the Leisure Activities Office, 
and a representative from each team 
must be present. 



Theatre. ..continued 
from page 1 



the adult audiences versus high school 
audiences. Payne does not prefer the 
high school audience because the time 
of day of their performance is so 
unusual for them. He says.'Wedo our 
shows at 10 a.m. for the high school 
students, and that is really off sched- 
ule for theatre people. We are up late 
nights and do see daylight very of- 
ten." 

Payne is rather pleased to play 
to mixed audiences. Heobserves.'The 
kids aren't afraid to laugh. They find 
Shakespeare's bawdy material very 
funny, but you won't get adults to 
laugh at it They are either above it, or 
they think that Shakespeare never 
wrote that kind of filth. The adults will 
get some of the more sophisticated 
humor in it. So if you have a mixed 
audience like that it is really great. 
They learn from each other." 

After the season here is over, it 
is back on the road for Gregory Payne 
and Amy Slade. They don't really 
f"~know where they will be at this time 
: next year. Possibly that unknown 
: destination is one of the things that 
: draws actors into the theatre. One thing 
\ is for sure, Slade and Payne, and other 
: actors like them have had a wonderf ul 
: opportunity to see a variety of places 
and, through crowd reaction, learned 
; a lot about people across the nation. 



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NOVEMBER 8, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 5 



SPORTS 



NSU blows away 
NT Eagles, 25-1 7 



By CHRIS McGEE 
Sports Writer 

Momentum is a funny thing. It's 
neither prejudiced, nor is it faithful. It 
had a fourth quarter fling with North 
Texas Saturday, but, fortunately, for 
the Demons, it spent three quarters 
bestowing profitable gains on NSU's 
grid troops. 

Head coach Sam Goodwin's 
Demons maintained absolute control 
for the first 45 minutes of its game 
with Southland Conference foe North 
Texas en route to a 25-17 jolting of 
the Eagles. 

The crucial win, one of monu- 
mental proportions, improved NSU's 
record to 8- 1 , more importantly 5-0 in 
the SLC, and all but officially assured 
the Demons of a spot in the division 
I-AA playoffs which begin in three 
weeks. 

Meanwhile, the mighty contin- 
ued to fall as North Texas, the top- 
ranked team in the land two short 
weeks ago, dropped its second straight 
decision. The Eagles continuing slide 
placed them at 3-2 in SLC play and 6- 
3 overall. 

Not that Goodwin has time to 
feel sorry for North Texas, though, or 
even would if he could. 

"It would be hard to keep us out 
of the playoffs now," exclaimed 
Goodwin. "We're going to finish one 
or two in the conference. I'd be 
shocked if they didn't take two from 
the best I- AAA conference." 

Shocked? Well, at least North 
Texas was by halftime thanks in part 
to an early ankle injury to star quarter- 
back Scott Davis, enabling the advan- 
tageous Demons to gain that all-im- 
portant momentum early in the first- 
half. 

Davis' momentary replacement, 
Bron Beal, came in to orchestrate an 
Eagle drive which had advanced deep 
inside Demon territory with the Eagles 
owning a 3-0 lead early in the first 
quarter. Christmas came early for 
Demon comerback Randy Hilliard as 
he snatched a lazy lob from Beal at the 
NSU 20 and raced 80 yards down the 
right sideline for the score. 

"My man ran a curl and I read 
it," admitted Hilliard. "I caught it and 
saw nothing but white shirts upfield. I 
kind of smiled as I was running." 

Smiling? Well, if Hilliard and 
Goodwin were smiling at that point, 
then it would have taken plastic sur- 
gery to remove their grins they as- 
sumed at halftime. 

Runningbacks Kenneth DeWitt 
and Pete Ellis later finished off long- 
sustained drives with touchdown runs 
of 4 and 2 yards respectively, and 
placekicker Keith Hodnett drilled a 
50 yard field goal as time ran out in the 
half, leaving the Demons with an 
inconceivable 22-3 lead over the 
nation's seventh-ranked team. 

After Hilliard's interception 
return equipped the Demons with an 
early 7-3 first quarter lead, the NSU 
defense stymied the Eagles, and the 
Demons' offense proceeded to take 
the wind right out of North Texas' 
sails. 

NSU catalyst Scott Stoker found 
a favorable target in receiver Mark 
Mayfield, completing passes of 17 
and 18 yards to the Shreveport native 
on the Demons' first scoring drive. 
DeWitt then sneaked into the endzone, 
and the Demons led 13-3asHodnett's 
PAT was blown by the heavy winds, 
halting his string of consecutive extra 
points at 51. 

The Demons didn't have far to 
journey on their next possession as 
they took over at the North Texas 21, 
a result of a Beal 1 1 yard punt, also 
affected by the strong winds. Ellis 
later capped off the short drive with a 
2 yard scamper into the endzone. 
Hodnett lost another battle to the wind 



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and missed the extra point. The 
Demons led at that point 19-3. 

Ah, the wind. What a villainous 
role it played. The cantankerous gusts, 
which wreaked its havoc for the dura- 
tion of the game, were blowing at 25 
MPH. Neither team was immune to 
the uncooperative treachery. 

Hodnett missed not one, but two 
extra points, Beal recorded an eleven 
yard punt, and NSU' s Mark Contreras 
shanked one punt of his own which 
actually lost a yard which led to the 
Eagles' first score, a 30 yard Keith 
Chapman field goal. 

The turbulent tumult prompted 
Stoker's bewildering stance. "I don't 
see how they play in this. Winning in 
these conditions is unbelievable. I 
don't ever want to play in this again." 
The wind turned out to be the best 
defense against Stoker as the junior 
managed only 100 yards passing. 

Who knows from whence the 
wind blows? 

Hodnett sought retribution and 
booted a 50 yarder as time ran out in 
the half, giving the Demons their 22- 
3 halftime lead. The Demons used a 
19 yard Stoker pass to Floyd Turner 
and a 16 yard strike from Stoker to 
split-enc Al Edwards to move the 
Demons from their own 10 yard-line 
into Hodnett's range with 1 :40 left on 
the clock to work with. 

Hodnett came through once 
again in the third quarter as he knocked 
one home from 24 yards out to further 
up the Demon lead to 25-3. It turned 
out to be the only scoring of the quar- 
ter by either half as NSU's defense 
contained the dangerous Scott Davis, 
whoNiad returned to the game after 
suffering a twisted ankle earlier. 

By now, Goodwin was well 
aware of the strong gusts present and 
elected to go for it on a fourth and nine 
from the Demon 30 rather than risk a 
fatal punt into the wind. DeWitt was 
wrapped up for a loss, and the Eagles, 
for the first time since early in the first 
quarter, had excellent field position to 
operate with as they gained posses- 
sion at the Demon 26. 

Four plays later, Davis did the 
honors himself, scoring a touchdown 
from a yard out. Chapman added the 
extra point, and the Eagles had 
trimmed NSU's lead to 25-10. 

The Eagles, sensing a comeback, 
stuffed the Demon offense, forcing 
NSU to punt. Davis and company 
then went to work with 4: 30 left in the 
game, completing 7 passes including 
a 17 yarder to Kiev Tatum. Monty 
Moon then finished off the drive with 
a 2 yard jaunt to paydirt. Chapman 
booted the PAT, and North Texas had 
come on with 14 straight unanswered 
points. 

The Demons met with concern 
when North Texas successfully re- 
covered an onside kick. The Eagles 
seemed destined to catch up with NSU 
as Davis directed North Texas47 yards 
downfield before the drive stalled. 

The wind, which had been an 
agitating pain throbbing the Demons, 
then did an about-face, blowing away 
Chapman's 25 yard field-goal attempt. 
Meanwhile, the Demons blew into an 
almost-sure playoff birth as they held 
on for the 25-17 triumph. 




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PAGE 6 



CURRENT SAUCE 



CAMPUS LINE 



Delta Sigma Pi 

Delta Sigma Pi is an organiza- 
tion open for all interested business 
related majors. Meetings are held 
Tuesdays at 7:30p.m. and/or Wednes- 
days from 8 a.m. to 10 am. in the 
Home Economics Lounge. 

Catholic Student 
Organization 

Mass will be held on November 
1 3 at 6 p.m . at the Holy Cross Catholic 
Church. All students, staff, faculty, 
family, and friends are invited to share 
in fellowship and a gumbo dinner 
immediately following in the Catho- 
lic Student Center. 

Student Support Services 

Mid-term grades may be picked 
up Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m. in room 104 B of Kyser Hall. 

Juniors 

The Writing Proficiency Test 
for Juniors will be administered at 1 1 
a.m. Tuesday, November 15, in Kyser 
Hall room 333. 

Taking the test is a graduation 
requirement for students who began 
college in the fall of 1985 or after. 

Students should bring a blue 
book, pen, dictionary, and ID to the 
test. Results will be posted outside the 
Language Arts Department after 
Thanksgiving. 



Employee Vacation 

Thanksgiving - the University 
will close at 4:30 p.m., Friday, No- 
vember 1 8 thru Friday, November 25. 
Civil leave will be granted by Dr. 
Alost for Monday, Tuesday, and 
Wednesday. 

Christmas - the University will 
close at 4:30 p.m., Friday, December 
16 and will reopen at 8 a.m. , Tuesday, 
January 3, 1989. For the days that are 
not state holidays, employees will have 
to use annual and/or compensatory 
leave. 

Alexandria, Fort Polk, and Shre- 
veport facilities will take similar holi- 
days with Dr. Baumgardner and Dr. 
Airhart authorized to grand excep- 
tions where warranted. 

University police, power plant 
and other essential services will main- 
tain operations during these periods. 



Kappa Sigma 

Kappa Sigma would like to 
congratulate president Kevin Peters 
and s tardus ter Melissa Conales for 
being elected Mr. and Miss NSU. 

Kappa Sigma would also like to 
invite all cheerleaders, pom-pom and 
danceline members to a social ex- 
change Wednesday, November 9, 
starting at 8 p.m. at the Kappa Sigma 
house. 



Tri-Sigma 

The members of Sigma Sigma 
Sigma would like to congratulate 
Kirsten Gemhauser on four success- 
ful years on Northwestern's volley- 
ball team. 

Tri-Sigma would also like to 
announce this week as Sigma Fun 
Week. 

Sigmas, don't forget to be at the 
house at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday! 

Potpourri 

The next meeting for the Pot- 
pourri is Thursday, November 8, at 1 1 
a.m. in 225 Kyser. 



Early Registration 

Continuing students who wish 
to register early may pick up their 
Student Schedule Request Card in the 
Student Union. Get your 1989 Spring 
Schedule from either the Registrar's 
Office or the University Bookstore. 
Once you've completed your 1989 
schedule and checked with your advi- 
sor, take your finished schedule card 
to the Registrar's Office. 

Rape Seminar 

A presentation called "Date Rape- 
What to Do About It" will be held on 
Thursday, November 10, at 1 1 a.m. in 
the Home Economics Building, Room 
106. JoyceSegelhorstfromtheYWCA 
Rape Crisis Center in Shreveport will 
talk about what a person goes through 
if she's been raped, what to do is you or 
someone you know has been raped, and 
how to prevent rape. The seminar is 
sponsored by the Student Member 
Section, Louisiana Home Economics 
Association and is open to the public. 
For more information, contactDr. Sally 
Hunt at 357-5587. 



Parking 

New hours for open zones for 
parking will be 3 p.m. through 7 a.m. 
Open zones for parking do not include 
spaces designated for handicapped 
loading zones and 15 minute parking. 

Due to the increasing problem of 
speeding on campus, University Po- j 
lice will have areas on campus under 
radar protection. 

Rowing Team 

Anyone interested in the North- 
western Rowing Team should go to 
practices Monday through Friday from 
5 to 6 p.m. at Chaplin's Lake. Anyone, 
unable to make practice can call 357- 
5971. 



Purple Jackets 

There will be a Purple Jackets 
meeting this Thursday, November 10 
at 5 p.m. in the Student Union. 



Freshmen 

The freshman class will be host- 
ing a fall dance for all freshmen from 
8 p.m. to midnight on November 16 at 
the Rec. Complex. A theme for the ! 
dance will be announced later. 



BSU Lunch 

The Baptist Student Union is 
holding a Polynesian Lunch on Tues- 
day, November 8, from 1 1:30 a.m. to 
1 p.m. Everyone is invited and take- 
out is available. The lunch is spon- 
sored by the Student Personnel Asso- 
ciation. 



Panhellenic 

Panhcll enic Semi-formal will be 
Thursday, Nov. 10. Anyone wishing 
to purchase tickets for $2 per couple 
and $1.50 per single may contact any 
Panhellenic representative. 




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NOVEMBER 15, 1988 NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 

OF LOUISIANA 



VOL. 77, NO. 16 




New Vic subject of controversy 



New" Vic 



By KAREN ENGERON 
Staff Writer 

For those of you who have ex- 
pressed a strong dislike to the new Vic 
the Demon, have no fear, something is 
j§ being done! 

In last week's paper, 94 students 
signed a petition stating, "Let the 
student body decide if we like this 
new 'sick' Vic." Well, your cry of 
fury has been heard. 

A new Vic the Demon will hit 
the field in the Fall of '89 — if we can 
raise the money! The cost of a new 
one will be $7000. Discussion on this 
has been made with Walt Disney 
Productions. If bought, he will have 
one Demon head, but several outfits. 

Mrs. Georgia Beasley, Direc- 
tor of Admissions and Recruiting, Mr. 
Bill Brent, Director of Music and the 
Student Government Association are 
working together to get the new Vic. 

The old Vic was purchased in 
the Spring of '84 at a cost of $2500. 
Since then, Vic has been through a lot. 



Because the head part of the costume 
was awkward and heavy, it was un- 
comfortable to wear as well as being 
difficult to see out. The fur on Vic's 
nose and cheeks had also worn off of 
its face. It was old and filthy. Most of 
all, Vic's outfit was hard to clean, 
therefore, giving it a horrible smell. 

Despite all rumors of Vic being 
burned at the stake, is just not true. He 
is at his final resting place — a box, 
not a coffin. 

Brad Arnold, coordinator of the 
Northwestern yell leaders, said that at 
camp last summer, comments were 
made to get a new Demon. 

Dr. Robert Alost, president of 
Northwestern, said, "The old one was 
so dirty, we didn't want it represent- 
ing Northwestern. We didn't have the 
funds to buy the expensive ones, so 
we bought an inexpensive outfit that 
we could get fast" The new Demon 
cost between $600 and $700. 

Carol Fleming of California, a 



maker of mascots for universities, 
made Vic. 

There has been a big commo- 
tion on campus since the new Demon 
came to Northwestern. Many com- 
ments have been made, good, bad and 
indifferent 

"I don ' t like it," Alost said. "We 
are going to now try to raise the funds 
in order to make the students happy." 

"I am not opposed to the new 
Vic. There was grumbling when the 
old Vic came to NSU. When some- 
thing is changed, people will com- 
plain," said Brent. 

Randy Crow, a senior yell leader 
from Little Rock, Arkansas, said, "It 
is easier for Vic to wear and see out of . 
It would have been nice if we could 
have one that looked like the old Vic, 
but was more comfortable." 

Scott Dugas, a freshman yell 
leader from New Orleans, stated, "I 
think he looks all right, but he looks 
like a Cabbage Patch Demon. He has 



droopy pants, it looks like he took a 
dump in them." 

Tynes Hildebrand, NSU Ath- 
letic Director, said, "The old one was 
heavy and very hot The new one; 
however, is more workable. I thought 
it was for the other team when I first 
saw it" Hildebrand was involved in 
the designing of the old Vic. 

Laurie House, a freshman yell 
leader from Shreveport, commented, 
"I don't tike it! The radio announcer 
hit it on the head when he called it the 
'Elephant Man." 

Sidney Rogers , a sophomore yell 
leader from Rayville, said, "I don't 
like it He doesn't look like a Demon 
at all." 

Vic the Demon himself, com- 
mented, "I'm tired of all the fans kick- 
ing me and throwing stuff at me. I 
know it's going to take a while for 
everyone to get use to the new me but 
they can at least try. I'm a lot lighter 
and my visibility is 100 percent bet- 
ter." 



WA match to decide Northwestern 9 s playoff status, game site 



ly SONYA RIG AUD 
\ditor 

This Saturday's game against 
tephen F. Austin (SF A) may make or 
peak North western's chances of 
(osting a first round playoff game. 

If the Northwestern Demons 
hould happen to win against the 
nighty Lumberjacks of SFA, then 
urpin Stadium has an excellent 
iance for being the site of the first 
Hind game, said Greg Burke, execu- 
ve director of the Northwestern 
ithletic Association. Burke said the 



Demons would then be the Southland 
Conference Champions and automati- 
cally one of the 16 teams in the play- 
offs which will help Northwestern in 
the NCAA decision on the hosting 
team. 

However, Burke said if North- 
western loses the fight against SFA, 
this loss will promote the Demons to 
wild card status for a spot in the play- 
offs making chances for hosting the 
playoff game not very good. 

The first round game is sched- 
uled for Saturday, November 26, the 



quarter finals will be cr December 3, 
the semi-finals are set for December 
10, and the championship game will 
be in Pocatello, Idaho on December 
17. 

Northwestern submitted a bid to 
the NCAA which will review it along 
with other submitted bids from prob- 
able playoff choices. 

The first round game falls dur- 
ing the Thanksgiving Holiday while 
most students are at home eating tur- 
key sandwiches. Burke said, "If we 
host the game, Housing has agreed to 



open the dorms to the students at noon 
Saturday, November 26 in order for 
them to attend." The dorms are regu- 
larly scheduled to open on Sunday. 

"We're trying to make every 
effort to accommodate the students by 
orening the dorms early to support 
their team," said Burke, adding, "We 
want to have a school worthy of na- 
tional recognition. But we need the 
support of the students, faculty and 
staff of Northwestern, as well as the 
community." 

Burke said the community is 



working to support Northwestern if 
the school is chosen. A number of 
businesses have made a conditional 
guarantee of whatever amount they 
choose to help pay the difference in 
case we don't make the amount we 
bid," he said. 

Burke said the NCAA is requir- 
ing the hosting team to charge admis- 
sion to students. Reserved tickets will 
be $10, general admission will be $6 
and student tickets will be $5. 

Burke would like to encourage 
students to auend the playoff game if 



hosted by Northwestern. Every stu- 
dent should come back only one day 
earlier to show his or her spirit 

Burke feels that NLU's home 
field advantage last year helped the 
team get to the National Champion- 
ship. 'The Indians had a great deal of 
support which pushed them up the 
ladder." 

Burke said, "I think we have a 
national championship caliber foot- 
ball team. But we need the fans to get 
out there and support them." 



hakespeare would have liked it 



LRT's "Romeo and fuliet" shines 



H. SCOTT JOLLEY 
tffWriter 

One of William Shakespeare's 
eatest tragedies, Romeo and Juliet, 
S enjoyed many excellent perform- 
K£s around the country. TheLou- 
iana Repertory Theatre's produc- 
m, recently staged on November 12, 
one of these, with almost all of its 
tyers delivering wonderful perform- 
ces. Shakespeare would have liked 

The stars of the play, under- 
ndably , are Romeo (Gregory Payne) 
11 Juliet (Amy Slade). These two 
performed these roles together 
attending Berea College in 
Wucky, which appears to have 
v ed them well. Payne gives an 
Client rendition of the lovesick 
)rtl eo, his moods swinging from 
Won to depression. 

He is perfectly matched to Slade, 
10 literally becomes the character. 
e was the only one who really acted 



instead of merely reciting her lines. 
Compelling the audience to totally 
suspend their disbelief, her perform- 
ance is comparable to that of Olivia 
Hussey's Juliet in Franco Zefferelli's 
magnificent film production of the 
famous play. Amy Slade is Juliet 

Their work together in college 
obviously paid off, as evidenced by 
any time that these two are on stage 
together. There is a certain electricity 
between the two — whenever they 
meet, the audience can feel the pal- 
pable emotions that flow off the stage. 
Particularly moving is the balcony 
scene, when Romeo professes his love 
to Juliet by moonlight. 

Other good performances in- 
clude thatofFelixEckhardas Romeo's 
jovial friend Mercutio. Eckhard is a 
flawless Mercutio, his boundless 
exuberance and witty rejoinders 
brightening up Romeo's gloomy 
moods. Ronald J. Aulgur turns in a 
well-executed performance of Friar 



Laurence, the Franciscan monk who 
tries his best to help the star-crossed 
lovers but to no avail. Jody McCoy is 
Juliet's Nurse, a delightfully scatter- 
brained character who dearly loves 
! her mistress. McCoy is very good in 
. this role, especially when her mind 
goes off on a tangent instead of con- 
centrating more important matters at 
hand. 

All four of the family heads are 
portrayed nicely, but the Capulets, 
having more lines and action than the 
Montagues, obviously have the better 
performances. As the blustery but 
lovable Capulet, Scott Edmonds de- 
livers more proof that he is one of the 
best actors that the LRT has to offer 
(even though he has a minimal role in 
this play, look for Edmonds in Noises 
Off and, in a much more substantial 
To\e,in Anna Christie). He is compli- 
mented by Leslie Lynn Meeker's Lady 
Capulet. 

As most people know, Romeo 



and Juliet is not a sugary sweet love 
story. There are many deaths on stage, 
some resulting from the feud between 
Capulet and Montague, and some from 
bad acting. Benvolio, played by Scott 
Hubbard, acts like he was reading 
from cue cards and badly printed ones 
at that Clive Carlin, as Escalus, the 
Prince of Verona, is just as bad when 
he makes his entrance, plants his feet 
squarely at center stage, and gives a 
deadpan, emotionless delivery of his 
lines. 

Aside from these two poor per- 
formances, the Theatre's version of 
Romeo and Juliet is an excellent one. 
The main roles are perfect, with Amy 
Slade' s Juliet the shining star of the 
play. These two are augmented with 
fine supporting characters, making the 
LRT' s production one that would have 
made Shakespeare proud. 

The last chance to see this out- 
standing work of drama will be this 
Wednesday, Nov. 16 at 10 a.m. 



Weekend prepares cadets 



ROTC conducts military exercise 



' H. SCOTT JOLLEY 
VfWriter 

It's 4:30 in the morning and 
^ess has long since settled over 
countryside. A cool mist weighs 
^ily on the camouflaged faces of 
* soldiers hidden deep in the woods. 
Skiing with static, a voice pierces 
15 blanket of night from a soldier's 

"A-Team Leader, I want you to 
e your men to the side of the hill 
1(1 set up a flanking position. B- 
Leader, your men will lay down 
""essive fire. Get your men into 



position and report to me when you 
are ready. We will attack on my 
command." 

No, it'snotascene from episode 
42 of War and Remembrance, it's 
Operation: Kit Carson, a patrolling 
exercise conducted by Northwestern ' s 
Reserve Officers Training Corps 
(ROTC) on November 11 and 12 at 
Fort Polk. 

40 cadets from NSU, Centenary 
College in Shreveport, and Louisiana 
State University-Shreveport, partici- 
pated in the Field Training Exercise 
(FTX) in which small detachments of 



troops were sent out into the woods 
near Fort Polk on a reconaissance 
mission for combat operations. 

Prior to the weekend at Fort Polk, 
cadets planned and organized activi- 
ties that led up to the FTX. When they 
arrived at the exercise, senior cadets 
planned logistics, supply efforts, and 
coordinated the weapons and ammu- 
nition. Several of the senior cadets 
had to organize and manage a com- 
mand post, setting it up with commu- 
nication facilities and supply outposts. 

A week earlier, junior cadets 



were given cadets platoon operation 
orders and had to extract the informa- 
tion necessary to prepare squad op- 
eration orders. The basic course ca- 
dets provided needed service support 
and performed such duties as radio 
operations and command post man- 
agement 

This exercise was just one in a 
series of FTX's in preparation for 
ROTC Advanced Camp, where ca- 
dets are placed in leadership positions 
and stressful situations to test their 
capabilities. 




Pledging his eternal love, Romeo (Gregory Payne) speaks to 
Juliet (Amy Slade) on her balcony. Romeo and Juliet will hold 
its final performance on on Wednesday, November 10, at 10 
a.m. in the A. A. Fredericks Fine Arts Auditorium. 



i 



PAGE 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



NOVEMBER 15, 198fr 




Journalism Coordinator Tommy Whitehead and Assistant Managing Editor of the Shre- 
veport Times Charlotte Burrows look over a schedule of sessions offered at J-Day. 

Journalism Day hosts students 



By BETH BOWMAN 
Staff Writer 

On Friday, November 1 1 , over 
150 high school students from Louisi- 
ana visited Northwestern to partici- 
pate in NSU's annual Journalism Day. 
The event, specifically geared toward 
students with a journalism interest, 
provides students with an opportunity 
to become acquainted with working 
professionals in various fields. It is 
sponsored by Northwestem's journal- 
ism division in the Department of 
Language Arts. 

The day began at 8 a.m. with 
registration for all who attended. 
Immediately following was the open- 
ing session with a greeting from Dr. 
Robert Alost, presidentof Northwest- 
ern State University. Mrs. Georgia 
Beasley, director of admissions, wel- 
comed the students to both Journal- 
ism Day and Northwestem's 
campus.The highlight of the opening 
session was the keynote address given 
by Ms. Charlotte Burrows, Assistant 
i Managing Editor of The Shreveport 
Times. 

Ms.Burrows is a graduate of 
the University of Texas, and has been 
on the editorial staff of The Times 
since 1959. Her career began as a city 
court reporter for The Times, and later 
she held assignments in education and 
city news before her appointment as 
both editor of the Sunday Magazine, 
and director of the Times' Enterprise 
Team. The Enterprise Team is a spe- 
cial unit of investigative reporters. 

A member of the S igma Delta 
Chi professional journal society, Ms. 
Burrows iscredited with helping form 
the Shreveport Press Club. She has 
received numerous journalism awards 
from various press agencies. These 
include awards from United Press 
International, Associated Press, the 
Associated Press Managing Editors' 
association, the Louisiana Press As- 
sociation, and Louisiana Press 
Women. 

The miu-afternoon was com- 
prised of group sessions discussing a 
wide variety of journalist interests. 

Charlotte Burrows spoke on 
newspapers and the surrounding as- 
pects. Steve Horton, former editor 
of NSU's Potpourri yearbook and 
current faculty member at Captain 
Shreve High School in Shreveport, 
conducted his session on yearbook 
publication. 

Catherine Slusher,an account 
executive for Carter-Williams Inc. of 
Shreveport, handled the public rela- 
tions session. 

Stan Alost, photo editor for 
the Baton Rouge Morning Advocate, 
was the speaker for the photography 
session. 

Connie Ledoux, an adjunct 
professor of journalism at NSU and 
former news producer for W AFB tele- 
vision in Baton Rouge, spoke to stu- 
dents interested in broadcast journal- 
ism. Following the sessions, a video 
of Northwestem's journalism was 
shown. 

The afternoon concluded with 
Mr. Leon Lindsey's address during 
the closing session. Mr. Lindsey pres- 
entation focused on "Journalism's 



ChallengeandYourOpportunity".Mr. 
Lindsey, an associate professor of 
journalism atNorthwestem, joined the 
Northwestern faculty this year after 
serving since 1965 as city editor and 
correspondent for the Christian Sci- 
ence Monitor, in Boston, Massachu- 
setts. 

Tommy Whitehead served as 



both coordinator and monitor of Jour- 
nalism Day. Mr. Whitehead, head of 
journalism at Northwestern, com- 
mented, "We feel this program is 
excellent, in that professionally speak- 
ing it represents the best in this area of 
Louisiana. The high school students 
should have received excellent ex- 
amples in the field of their interest. " 



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NOVEMBER 15,1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 3 




Give Scholars 9 College time, patience 

By BRAD BODENHEIMER 

.Staff Writer 

Everyone was so excited when the Louisiana Scholar's College first opened its doors. It was to revolutionize higher education in a state that was 

long overdue for an academic coup. 

But you would be hard-pressed to find students today who are happy with Scholar's College. After starting off with a class of 200, there arc now 
only about 75 students enrolled, and many of them are planning to leave at the end of the semester. 

But a mere year-and-half is not enough time to judge a brand new institution. So why are all these people deciding to leave? 

Well, according to two students, everything is constandy changing— there is no sense of stability — because the college is so young. They are trying 
to make improvements in the curriculum, but this is upsetting students' oudooks toward the college. Also, some of the courses cannot be transferred 
directly to other universities. "Paradigms of Nature," in which four different areas of science are concentrated on at different times, is one example I am 
always hearing about. 

But probably the most significant reason is summed up by Freshman Lisa Giddens: "We're not concentrating on math, science, and the important 
things in education that will help me in the future." 

Most of these reasons should have been foreseen, though, before students decided to attend the Scholar's College. When I was being recruited to 
attend, it was made quite clear that I would only be able to receive a liberal arts degree, and with the college being brand new, students should have expected 
some technical problems in the first few years. I mean, they're just trying to make it better for the students. 

Yet, still the fact remains that many students are leaving. Not only is it a very inauspicious way for the college to start out, but it also detracts a little 
something from Northwestern when its innovation is faltering. 

Let's give it time. Some of you may not like the Scholar's College for whatever reason, but let's not write it off yet. I believe that once it becomes 
stable and works out the kinks, it will, indeed, become a noted center for learning in Louisiana. I just think many students don't like the fact that they are 
guinea pigs. I wouldn't either if I were in their shoes. Realize that it is their future we are talking about. 



Early Registration really does save time 

By BRAD BODENHEIMER 

Staff Writer 

I think many people are remembering the registration woes that they encountered for the last few years and are finally getting smart and pre- 
registering. It's just so easy to do nowdays and you are practically assured of getting the classes you request 

The problem, good readers, lies in the fact that this semester, it seems like every class has only one section and they are all offered only at 9:00 MWF. 

Take, for example, World History 102, a core course. It's offered only once. How about business majors? Accounting 106 — one section. Higher 
maths (201 and above) — once apiece. 

But even classes with many sections have problems, in that they are offered at only a few different times, although with different instructors. I mean, 
what if all the classes you need to take are only offered at three or four different fimes? 

The heart of the problem is that there aren't enough faculty members to offer these classes at various times. Three out of the five departments 
contacted said that they could use more instructors, and one said they get by only because of adjunct professors. 

Now, I do realize that the students must be flexible. It's true that everyone can't schedule their classes between ten and twelve o'clock. And I'm 
not trying to say that the "early registration" system is a bad thing because it's not. The registration process has been brought a long way. 

What I simply don't understand is why classes aren't offered at times that are less conflicting with each other. As one faculty member put it, "It 
seems like they're trying to accomodate the faculty and not the students." 

If we're so short on teachers, why spend so much money on campus beautification projects? It seems that there must be better, more practical ways 
of helping the students. I'd personally rather have two or three good instructors on campus than a pond. 

But if you think it's bad at early registration, just wait and see what happens at regular registration. If you're having problems now, wait until then. 
So now, more than ever, is the time to make sure you take the time to pre-register. 



C (ZB 




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(amp a time owe. 



Current Sauce 



The Current Sauc&'is published weekly during the 
i fall and spring semesters by the students of Northwest- 
ern State University of Louisiana, tt is not associated 
with any of the University's departments and is fi- 
nanced independently , 

The Current Sauce is based In the Office of 
Student Publications located in Kyser Halt. The office 
of the editorial staff is 225H , telephone (3 1 8) 357-5456. 
The adviser's office is 103 Kyser Hall, telephone 357- 
5213. 

The mailing address for the Current Sauceis P.O. 
Box 5306, NSU, Natchitoches, LA 71497. 

All con espondence, including letters to the edi- 
tor is welcome. Material submitted for consideration 
must be mailed to the above address or brought to 

the office. 

The deadline for all advertisement and copy is 3 
p.m. each Friday. Inclusion of any and all material Is 
left to the discretion of the editor. 

Letters to the editor should be typed (double- 
spaced), signed and should include a telephone 
number where the writer can be reached. No anony- 
mous letters will be printed. 

Current Sauce subscription rates are $11 per 
academic year (28 issues) or $6 per semester (14 
issues). The paper Is entered as second-class .nail at 
Natchitoches. LA. Tho USPS number is 140-660. 





SONYARIGAUD 








Editor 








MICHELLE WEEGO 








Managing Editor 






MINDY BECK 


BRAD BODENHEIMER SHANNON BOUFFANIE 


BETH BOWMAN DeANNA COCHRAN 


KAREN ENGERON 


SHANNON J. GREER H. SCOTT JOLLEY 


LAURIE LcBLANC 


ELIZABETH McDAVID CHRIS McGEE BRIAN McPHEARSON 




ANNE MILLER CAROLINE WARD 






Staff Writers 








TIM JOHNSON RANDY JONES 




GLEN MOORMAN ROBERT ROUGEAU 




Photographers 








EVAN TAYLOR 






ALLEN 


Cartoonist 




EDD LEE 


EVANS 






Circulation/ 


Advertising 


SCOTT MILLS 




Distribution 


Advertising assistant 








DAMIAN DOMINGUE 








OLIVIA MAROMA 








Assistants to the editor 








TOM WHITEHEAD 








Adviser 







Fall '88 



Professor argues 
attendance policy 

Dear Mr. Bodenheimer, 

I have just finished reading your editorial on NSU's attendance policy 
in the November 8 issue of the Current Sauce. I should like, if I may make 
bold to do so, to realign your thinking about this matter, particularly your 
concluding remark, ". . . the faculty wants to make students go to class 
because they think students are not responsible enough to do so on their 
own." 

First of all , the obligation to keep attendance rolls comes down from the 
state board; it does not originate with the faculty. Second, taking roll is an 
absurd and odious task, more suited for policemen than teachers. Third, most 
of the faculty I know will agree with you — that keeping a running tally on 
every student's whereabouts is not what really mature people ought to be 
doing. Fourth, and probably most important, the requirement to keep atten- 
dance records has the unfortunate effect of pitting the students against the 
faculty in a kind of on-going gameof hide-and-seek. The faculty for the most 
part does not want to play this game nor, I think, do the students. It's waste- 
ful and stupid. 

I do not like the attendance policy because it encourages students to 
apologize (in both senses of the word) for their absenteeism. That means I am 
supposed to listen to students' excuses which are most bull drool. Any 
student with any snap at all can get an absence excused and all the athletes, 
members of campus clubs and organizations, get their absences excused out 
of hand. In fact, the attendance policy at NSU is what you get when a pack 
of meddling educational bureaucrats down in Baton Rouge get together and 
cook up something to justify their jobs. 

As far as your quoting Dr. Graham, VP of AA, quoting the faculty, 
wither you or he got the wires crossed. The faculty does not use the argument 
that "A" students would set a bad example by not showing up for class. On 
the contrary , my "A"students, so-called, show up regularly. Furthermore, the 
faculty Dr. Graham quotes, consist of one or two lickspittles and imbeciles 
who take the attendance policy seriously. 

My best advice to you is to shift your attention to something that merits 
iL After all, you go to class to learn something not to satisfy a head-count 

Neill Cameron 
Language Dept. 




What are you thankful for 
during the upcoming holiday? 





Chad Berry 

Business Administration 
Pineville 

"I'm thankful that I 
only have one more semes- 
ter of being a freshman and 
that I get to go home and eat 
real food." 



Eric Easter 

History/Political Science 
Bossier City 

"I'm thankful for 
being with my family and 
that orientation is finally 
over and for my good friends 
(Lance, Jason, Gary, etc.)." 





ChadMcGlothlin 

Pre-Medicine 

Alexandria 

"I'm thankful that the 
semester is almost over and 
that I get to sleep in a real 
bed for a whole week." 



Tara Tietjen 
Pre-Physical Therapy 
Keith ville 

"I'm thankful for my 
family and friends. I think 
that family reunions over 
the holidays are really im- 
portant. I am also thankful 
that this semester is finally 
winding down." 





Wendy Walters 

Marketing 

Many 

"I'm thankful that it's 
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time with them." 



Derrick A. R. Williams 
Broadcasting 
Baton Rouge 

"I'm thankful for 
being with my family and 
the city I come from." 



PAGE 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



NOVEMBER 15, 1988 



NEWS 



LOB to celebrate anniversary 



By H. SCOTT JOLLEY 
Staff Writer 

"30 Years of Puttin' on theRitz" 
is the theme for the 1989 Lady of the 
Bracelet pageant, sponsored by 
Northwestern 's Student Activities 
Board. Miss LOB will be chosen on 
Friday, January 27, 1989, at the A. A. 
Fredericks Fine Arts Auditorium. The 
pageant, a preliminary to the Miss 
Louisiana Pageant, will begin at 7 
p.m. with tickets selling for $2. NSU 
students can attend the event free with 
their student ID. 

Twenty girls have been selected 
to compete for the bracelet, which 
will be passed on by 1988 title holder 
Carol Jordan. Among those in the 
thirtieth anniversary pageant are: 
Cindy Bethel, a sophomore broad- 
casting/public relations major from 
Mansfield; Elizabeth Bonnette, a 
sophomore liberal arts major from 



Natchitoches; Patty Breckenridge, a 
freshman with a minor in vocal per- 
formance from Kingwood, Texas; 
Pam Broussard, a junior psychology 
major from Vinton; and Marlene 
Can field, a sophomore from Franklin- 
ton with a major in broadcast journal- 
ism and a minor in performing arts. 

Other pageant contestants are: 
Christi Cloutier, a junior broadcast 
journalism majorfrom Natchez; Karen 
Engeron, a sophomore from Houma 
with a major in political science and a 
minor in public relations journalism; 
Crystal Everette, a freshman from 
Lafayette with a major in liberal arts; 
and Yavette A. Green, a West Monroe 
sophomore with a major in pediatric 
nursing. 

Also included in the 1989 com- 
petition are: Shannon Greer, a fresh- 
man from Pineville with a major in 
elementary education; Kate Herring- 



ton; a Natchitoches freshman with a 
major in music education and a minor 
in English; Alicia Mayo, a freshman 
accounting major from Harrisonburg; 
Holley Methvin, a Dalhart, Texas, 
sophomore with a major in secondary 
English education and a minor in 
public relations; and Penelope Mezi- 
ere, a junior computer education sys- 
tems major from Natchitoches. 

Other contestants are: Jac- 
queline Morris, a Elm Grove fresh- 
man nursing major; Jana Parker, a 
freshman from Shreveport with a 
major in physical education; Marga- 
ret Perot, a freshman business major 
from Alexandria; Tamara 
Prudhomme, a sophomore from 
Kinder with a major in nursing; Mel- 
ody Smith, a senior elementary an 
secondary education major from 
Leesville; and Tara Tietjen, a fresh- 
man pre-physical therapy major from 
Keithville. 



Varnado sponsors first food event 



By BETH BOWMAN 
Staff Writer 

On Wednesday, November 9 , 
over 100 people gathered to hold a 
barbecue. However, this was not your 
everyday run-of-the-mill barbecue. It 
was the first dorm sponsored activity 
to be held this year. The barbecue, 
"Best Little Chicken Ranch at NSU" 
, was put on by the Vamado Hall 
Dorm Council for the residents of 
Varnado. 

"Chef Harold Boutte pre- 
pared the chicken and pork and beans. 
Dixie Dandy representative Jimmie 
Long donated costs over $50 to the 
festive feast. Fred Fulton and Mayor 
Joe Sampite also attended. The meal 
cost 50 cents a plate, and shirts are 
available for $8. 

Paula Burke, Varnado House 



Director commented.'The barbecue 
went over very well. I hope to see a 
crawfish boil in the spring." 

"I was impressed by the hard 
work that went into the preparation 
for the barbeque. The food was really 
good and I think all of the residence 
halls should sponsor activities like 
this," said Tina Dutile, a Varnado 
resident. 

The Dorm Council is com- 
posed of representatives from each 
wing of Varnado. Pam Boudreaux, 
vice-president,was in charge of or- 
ganizing the barbecue. The rest of the 
council consists of Karen Cresap, 
Sheryl Gill, Rhonda Benger, Angie 
Maggiore, Vonda Rutherford, Char- 
lotte Holmes, Laura Debusk, Laura 
McCelland, and Michelle Newton. 
The purpose of a dorm council is to 



bring back programming to the dorms 
individually and to campus as a whole. 

The Dorm Council is subdi- 
vided into three sections; programing, 
judicial, and administrative. Program- 
ming handles events, including the 
recent barbecue and a tentative future 
semi-formal. Judicial is responsible 
for helping to assist the house director 
decide consequences on minor inci- 
dentreports. Administrative represents 
the students of Varnado in drawing up 
petitions to make formal complaints 
to the administration. 

Many dorm aspects are now 
being dealt with within the Dorm 
Council, which will be reported to the 
house director. Burke commented 
"The Dorm Council is there for the 
resident. I see numerous advantages 
to having a Dorm Council because it 
also unites the residents as a whole." 




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• 2 Pieces of Chicken 
•Buttermilk Biscuit 

Get 2 pieces of the Colonel's 
Original Recipe. Extra Crispy or 
Extra Crispy Hot & Spicy Chicken 
(combination only), and 1 Butter- 
milk Biscuit with this coupon. 



Coupon good only at Natchitoches KFC and may not be used with any 
other special offers. Limit one per coupon. Customer pays all 
applicable sales tax. 
EXPIRES: November 30, 1988 




i 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



9 Piece 
Thrift Box 



•9 Pieces of Chicken 

•4 Hot Buttermilk Biscuits 

Get 9 pieces of the Colonel's 
Original Recipe, Extra Crispy or 
Extra Crispy Hot & Spicy 
Chicken (combination only) and 4 
hot Buttermilk Biscuits with this 
coupon. 



Coupon good only at Natchitoches KFC and 
other special offers. Limit one per cou 
applicable sales tax. 
EXPIRES: November 30, 1988 



$4 



99 




Kentucky 
Chicken yfft^. 



3 




may not be used with any 
pon. Customer pays all 




2 Piece 
Dinner 

•2 Pieces of Chicken 
•Mashed Potatoes & Gravy 
•Cole Slaw 
•Buttermilk Biscuit 

Get 2 pieces of the Colonel's 
Original Recipe, Extra Crispy or 
Extra Crispy Hot fir. Spicy 

Chicken (combination only), 
mashed potatoes and gravy, col: 
slaw and 1 Buttermilk Biscuit 
with this coupon. 

Coupon good only at Natchitoche: KFC and may not be used with any 
other special offers. Limit one per coupon. Customer pays all 
applicable sales tax. 
EXPIRES: November 30. 1)88 



9 Piece 
Value Pack 

•9 Pieces Of Chicken 
•Large Mashed Potatoes 
•Large Gravy 
•Large Cole Slaw 
•4 Buttermilk Biscuits 

Get 9 pieces of the Colonel's 
Original Recipe, Extra Crispy, 
Extra Crispy Hot fit Spicy Chicten 
(combination only), large mashel 
potatoes, large gravy, large cole 
slaw and 4 Buttermilk Biscuits 
with this coupon. 

Coupon good only at Natchitoches KFC and may not be used with any 
other special offers. Limit one per coupon. Customer pays all 
applicable sales tax. 
EXPIRES: November 30, 1»88 




3 Piece 
Dinner 

•3 Pieces of Chicken 
•Mashed Potatoes & Gravy 
•Cole Slaw 
•Buttermilk Biscuit 

Get 3 pieces of the Colonel's 
Original Recipe, Extra Crispy or 
Extra Crispy Hot fit Spicy Chicken 
(combination only), mashed pota- 
toes and gravy, cole slaw and 1 
Buttermilk Biscuit with this coupon. 

Coupon good only at Natchitoches KFC and may not be used with anv 
other special oilers. Limit one per coupon. Customer pays all 
applicable sales tax. 

EXPIRES: November 30, 1988 




I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

I 

I 
I 
I 



2 Piece 
Box 



•2 Pieces of Chicken 
•Buttermilk Biscuit 

Get 2 pieces of the Colonel's 
Original Recipe, Extra Crispy or 
Extra Crispy Hot fit Spicy Chicken 
(combination only), and 1 Butter- 
milk Biscuit with this coupon. 



Coupon good only at Natchitoches KFC and may not be used with any 
other special offers. Limit one per coupon. Customer pays all 
applicable sales tax. 
EXPIRES: November 30, 1988 




SUN.-THURS. 10-10 
FRI. & SAT. 10-11 



Kentucky Fried Chicken 



® 



107 HWY. 1 SOUTH 

352-5555 



NOVEMBER 15, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 5 



SPORTS 



















JSU Tigers tear apart Northwestern 



By CHRIS McGEE 
Sports Writer 

There was just something to- 
tally wrong with the whole mood foi 
the Northwestern State Demons Sat- 
urday night in Jackson, Mississippi. 
You could just sense it. 

Forget about the seven-game 
winning streak. Don'teventhinkabout 
the number seven ranking in the na- 
tional polls. The Demons were up 
against every element imaginable 
when they faced Jackson State's Ti- 
gers. 

The Demons came in with a 
slew of injuries that comprised tail- 
back Kenneth DeWittand safety Steve 
Compton, among others. 

In Jackson State the Demons 
were facing an absurdly mammoth, 
physical team that was ranked tenth in 
the nation. 



To put a bitter cherry on the top, 
the forecast was awful: pre-game tor- 
nado warnings and threatening, bleak 
clouds that turned to an indignant 
downpour by kickoff. Shakespeare 
couldn't have written a more grim 
script. 

The result? Well, the envelope, 
please? Hmm! I should have known. 
The Tigers take it 21-16. Something 
just didn't seem right, anyway. 

The Tigers led 14-10athalftime 
after a rain-drenched first half of ac- 
tion. The fact that the Demons were 
behind at intermission was, in itself, a 
prophecy of things to come. NSU 
head coach Sam Goodwin never has 



been one to take kindly to those soggy, 
slippery, and downright wet condi- 
tions, anyway. 

"We never have been a very 
good 'wet field' team," admitted 
Goodwin. "When you're smaller, it's 
tough to move big lugs. Wet fields are 
more suited for power teams like 
Jackson." 

A sour grapes assessment? 
Some may think so, but probably not. 
After all, the Tigers were BIG and 
seemed much more comfortable with 
the circumstances. 



Things looked good early in the 
second quarter when Demon fullback 
Mike O'Neal darted into the endzone 
from 12 yards out on a clutch fourth- 
down situation. Keith Hodneu's PAT 
made it 7-0 Demons. 

Jackson State was just itching to 
retort, though, and they did just that 
on the very next series. 

Tiger quarterback Shawn Gre- 
gory choreographed the scoring march 
by completing passes of 37 and 26 
yards. Jackson State's Ron Lewis 
made an acrobatic, one-handed catch 
over Demon defender Adrian How- 
ard deep in NSU territory. One play 
later, Gregory found his tight end, 
Darron Easterling in the comer of the 
endzone for the score. 

Gre 6 ^:,- was 8-20 passing for 
145 yards on the night. 

The Demons returned the favor 
by driving 37 yards in 7 plays to set up 
a Hodnett 42 yard field goal to put the 
Demons back in the lead, 10-7. That 



was to be the last time NSU would 
enjoy the view from there. 

After no scoring in the first 
quarter, it appeared that the game 
might turn into a scoring barrage. In 
fact, when the Tigers' Darryl Jones 
returned the next kickoff 40 yards to 
put the Tigers in good shape, the 
contest was reminiscent to two kids 
back-and-forth, continuing to snatch 
a piece of candy from one another. 

NSU's defense just couldn't put 
the clamps on the vaunted Tiger at- 
tack, which drilled to the Demon 2 
before Tiger tailback Lewis Tillman 
hauled it in for the touchdown. Osa 
Ohonba tacked on the PAT, and the 
Tigers led 14-10 at halftime. 

Tillman, who was a real thom in 
the Demons' side, piled up 172 yards 
on 41 carries for the night. 



NSU's halftime deficit was the 
first time they've had one at that point 
of agame since the second week of the 
season, a 35-26 loss to Nevada-Reno. 

Jackson State took the initiative 
in gaining some breathing room in the 
third quarter when linebacker Darion 
Conner swiped a Scott Stoker pass, 
setting the Tigers up at the Demon 4 1 
following an unsportsmanlike con- 
duct penalty on Jackson State. Gre- 
gory later finished off the drive by 
hitting receiver Reggie McGee in the 
endzone from 26 yards away. 
Ohonba' s extra point put the Tigers 
up fairly comfortably 21-10. 

Jackson State later drove down 
to the Demon 1 yard line, and things 



looked more dismal then a screen door 
in a submarine. However, that set the 
stage for a great goal-line stand as the 
Demon defense, in one of it's few 
proud moments, refused the Tigers 
admission into the endzone from the 
one on three straight plays. 

NSU had to score, and they did 
it in quick fashion, allowing barely 
enough time to take a deep breath. On 
the second play, Stoker found senior 
flanker Floyd Turner on a pass who 
covered most of the real estate on a 63 
yard scoring toss. The try for two 
failed and the Demons trailed the 
Tigers, 21-16 with just over 10 min- 
utes remaining in the game. 

Turner, one of the few bright 
spots for the Demons to reflect on, 
turned in an effort worthy of all- 
American acclaim by catching 7 passes 
for 120 yards. 

Stoker, harassed all night, man- 
aged to complete 1 1 of 22 passes for 
164 yards. 

Jackson State grinded out 355 
yards of total offense while the De- 
mons, without DeWitt and at a great 
weight disadvantage, tallied 265. 

After the 21- 16 setback, a quiet 
Sam Goodwin put things in perspec- 
tive. 

"You never gain anything from 
a loss, but if I had to lose one of these 
next two, it would have been the 
Jackson State game. 

"We didn't play very well. I 
don't know why. We lacked execu- 
tion, blocking, and the effort needed 
to beat a quality football team. It was 
a bad night for our coaching, block- 
ing, and mental game." 



Conference title for Demon hinges on win 



By CHRIS McGEE 
Sports Writer 

For the Demons it has all come 
down to this Saturday night. This will 
be what they have been playing and 
practicing for all along- the Southland 
Conference title and, along with it, the 
automatic privilege of representing 
the SLC in the division I-AA playoffs. 

Does that have you daydream- 
ing? Well, if that dream is realized, 
there will be plenty of happy campers 
around the Northwestern campus, but 
reality must be faced first. 

That's right. Reality. Reality in 
the form of the Stephen F. Austin 
Lumberjacks. The team from Na- 
cogdoches, Texas that is 6-0 in the 
SLC, tops in the nation in defense, 
and, oh yeah, the king of the hill in the 
division I-AA polls. 

Some may say that reality is for 
those who lack imagination, but come 
Saturday night, reality will be for those 
who are going after the conference 
crown, the NSU Demons. In the 
meantime, Sam Goodwin sings the 
Lumberjacks' praises. 

"They're just a real solid, sound 
football team. They're very physical, 
have a great kicking game, good of- 
fensive line and two very good run- 
ning backs," remarks Goodwin. "But 
what sets them apart from other teams 
in our league is their great defense. 
They just line up and whip you." 

Whip you? Yeah, you, North 
Texas, NLU, McNeese and a plethora 
of others. After victories over Prairie 
View and East Washington by scores 
of 38-3 and 48-10 respectively to go 
along with the perfect conference 
mark, you would think that head coach 
Jim Hess's boys have their own wood 
shed. 

Last Saturday's 21-16 loss to 
Jackson State showed the Demons the 
importance of tailback Kenneth 
DeWitt, who was out with a hairline 
fracture of the same arm he broke 
earlier this year. Without DeWitt, 
Jackson State keyed on Paul Frazier, 
who was aggravated by a shoulder 
injury himself. 

DeWitt, earlier, received an O.K. 
by doctors for the Stephen F. Austin 
game, but further x-rays will be exam- 
ined later this week. 

The Demons will almost cer- 
tainly need to establish a strong pass- 
ing attack Saturday night to have any 
r eal hopes of defeating the Lumber- 
jacks. Not that it will be any easy feat, 
as SFA ranks second in the confer- 
ence in pass defense. 

Spearheading the Lumberjack 
defense are senior defensive end Keith 
Melcher (6-3, 233) and senior middle- 



linebacker Eric Lokey (6-0, 217). 
Melcher has been a complete terror, 
notching 82 tackles, 7 sacks, 9 pass 
deflections, and 2 interceptions. 
Lokey, meanwhile, has been busy 
hitting anything that moves. Lokey 
leads SFA with 125 tackles and also 
has 6 sacks and 4 interceptions. 

Free safety David Whitmore, a 
physical 6-0, 230 lb. junior, has 
amassed 72 tackles and 6 pass deflec- 



tions. Those three certainly justify 
SFA ' s number one defensive ranking. 

The strength of the Lumberjack 
offense has been the equation of bal- 
ance. They've done the job on the 
ground and on the air. They just do iu. 
a sentiment to make Nike proud. 

Overall, this Stephen F. Austin 
squad has no real weaknesses and is 
about as solid as a steel wall. The 
offense is very competent, but the 



Lumberjacks have enjoyed the fruits 
of success thanks in good part to their 
defense. SFA has held opponents to 7 
points or less on five occasions this 
year. 

TheDemo^ whodroptxv*t'"> 8 
2 and tenth in trie iiauuiwu polls, win 
need to get some contributors healthy 
quick. DeWitt and comerback Kevin 
Lewis are both questionable for the 
game. 




Pizza inn 



124 HWY. 1 SOUTH 
NATCHITOCHES, LA 71457 
352-5250 




Order Two Pizzas 
And We'll Eat One. 

That's right. With these coupons you 
can ask for two pizzas and we'll pick up 
the bill for the second one. 



! FREE PIZZA 



Buy any size Thin or New York Style 
pizza at regular price and get the next smaller 
pizza with equal number of toppings 

FREE 

Not valid on deliver? or with any other offer 
Offer expires U'WU 



ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT BUFFET 



3.29 



124 HWY. 1 SOUTH 
NATCHITOCHES. LA 714S7 



Pizza inn- 



352-5250 



Pan, Thin and New York Style pizza, salad. Pasta. 

And now including new Pizzert* . . . 
A warm, delicious apple, peach or cherry fruit pie. 
MON.-FRL 1 1 :00am - 2:00pm SUNDAY 1 1 :30am - 100pm 
MON.- TUES. Night 5:30pm - 8:30pm. Dine-in only 
Not vaJld wt(h any other offer. 
Valid for up to 2 adulta at 3.29 pee pence. 
Limit 1 coupon per customer, par viaiL Offer cxpina 1 l/3Qr88 



B & L CONTACT LENSES 

FREE!?! 



That's right! Buy a pair of Bausch & 
Lomb Contact Lenses at Vision Ex- 
change's every day low price and 
get the second pair free 

Vision 



irrcussrrjwr 



EXCHANGE: 



CALL 352-1056 FOR APPOINTMENT 

WALKINS ACCEPTED • APPOINTMENTS HAVE PnlOIllTY 
CONTACT LENS FITTINGS BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. 



220 KEYSER AVE. • NATCHITOCHES, LA. 7M57 
318-352-1056 MRS.: M F 9-5 SAT. 9 3 



Typing Service 
Resumes, Theses, Term Papers and other typing done 
Professional quality at reasonable rates. We store 
documents on disk at no extra charge. Also spread- 
sheets, desktop publishing, graphics, mailing lists, and 
other computer work done. 
For the best service in town call 

TYPE MASTERS 
357-1145 



ATTENTION BSN 
CLASS OF 1989. 

The Air Force has a special pro- 
gram for 1 989 BSNs. If selected, 
you can enter active duty soon 
after graduation— without waiting 
for the results of your State Boards. 
To qualify, you must have an overall 
2.75 GPA. After commissioning, 
you'll attend a five-month intern- 
ship at a major Air Force medical 
facility It's an excellent way to pre- 
pare for the wide range of experi- 
ences you'll have serving your 
country as an Air Force nurse of- 
ficer For more information, call 

CAPT TURNER 
817-640-6469 COLLECT 



THURSDBV, N0UEMBER 17 

$4.00 BEER BUST 

RLL COL LNS DRINKS Sl.Sfl 
ALL NIGHT LONG 
*N0 C0UER TIL 10:30* 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18 
16 oz. DRAFT $1 
LONG ISLAND ICED TEA $1 
MARGARITAS $1.00 

ALL NIGHTLONG 
*NO COVER TIL 10:30* 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19 
BAR DRINKS $1, 9-11:30 

16 OZ. DRAFT $1 ALL NIGHT 
*NO COVER TIL 10:30* 



■ 



South China Restaurant 

every Tuesday night 

STUDENT DINNERS 

Reg. $9. 99 Special S 4.99 save $5.00 



#1. ImpcriaC Chicken 
#2. 'Boneless Chicken 
it 3. "Beef zuitfi 'Brottoli 

if 4. £(jg <Rof{ (I). Coabneal <DcPigtl (4) 

zo /fried thicken zuinga) 
# 5. Stoeet and Sour lork. 
it 6. (Moo §oo Cjai (Pan 



ail dinners intludc 'Emj £jj 'Drop soup, fried rite 

soft drinf^ and fortune tookjes 

307 Dixie Plaza tel. 352-8802 & 352-8803 




CLUB YESTERDAYS 

$2.00 Coupon 
ANY DRINK 



Offer good tf K fJ T *l O r " ONLY 

To \X«> M 
One drink per coupon per person 



t 

I 



PAGE 6 



CURRENT SAUCE 



NOVEMBER 15,1988 



CAMPUS LINE 



Delta Sigma Pi 

Delta Sigma Pi is an organiza- 
tion open for all interested business 
related majors. Meetings are held 
Tuesdays at 7:30p.m. and/or Wednes- 
days from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. in the 
Home Economics Lounge. 

Seminar 

The NSU Student Support Serv- 
ices is sponsoring two seminars to aid 
students on Thursday, November 17. 
The Fust is a test anxiety seminar, to 
be held at 1 1 :00 a.m. The second is a 
stage fright seminar entitled "How to 
Feel OK in Front of a Group", to be 
held at 6:00 p.m. The guest speaker is 
Dr. Millard Bienvenu, Ph.D. 

All interested students are asked 
to sign up in Kyser Hall, Room 104. 
Limited space is available. 



PE Majors Building 

Due to several factors, includ- 
ing Intramural Competition and the 
installation of the volleyball floor 
plates on the gym floor, we will not 
begin opening the PE Majors Build- 
ing for night-time and weekend free 
play until after Thanksgiving, on 
Monday, November 28. 

At that time, the night and week- 
end schedule of the PE Majors Build- 
ing will be as follows: 

Mon-Thurs: 5:00 - 9:00 p.m. 

Friday: Closed at 4:30 

Saturday: 2:00 - 6:00 p.m. 

Sunday: 2:00 - 6:00 p.m. 

Phi Beta Lambda 

Phi Beta Lambda had their 
monthly meeting on November 10. 
The guest speaker was Mr. Mike Toller 
of Ark/La Gas. 

Everyone needs to be sure and 
turn in their contest sheets for contest 
in the spring. 

December 2 is tenauvely sched- 
uled for the annual PBL Christmas 
party. A letter will be sent out as to 
where the party will be held. 

Beta Beta Beta 

Elections for officers for Beta 
Beta Beta will be held on Thursday, 
November 17, at 1 1:00 a.m. in room 
1 14, Bienvenu Hall. Everyone inter- 
ested in being in Beta Beta Beta, a 
revived biology club, is invited to 
attend. All members of Mu Epsilon 
Delta, MED, are also invited to the 
meeting. 

Student Support Services 

Mid-term grades may be picked 
up Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m. in room 104 B of Kyser Hall. 




Employee Vacation 

Thanksgiving - the University 
will close at 4:30 p.m., Friday, No- 
vember 1 8 thru Friday, November 25. 
Civil leave will be granted by Dr. 
Alost for Monday, Tuesday, and 
Wednesday. 

Christmas - the University will 
close at 4:30 p.m., Friday, December 
16 and will reopen at 8 a.m., Tuesday, 
January 3, 1989. For the days that are 
not state holidays, employees will have 
to use annual and/or compensatory 
leave. 

Alexandria, Fort Polk, and Shre- 
veport facilities will take similar holi- 
days with Dr. Baumgardner and Dr. 
Air hart authorized to grand excep- 
tions where warranted. 

University police, power plant 
and other essential services will main- 
tain oi>erations during these periods. 



Argus 

Argus is pleased to announce 
the winners of its fall contest. 

The prize for the best one-act 
play was won by Jason S. Martin. 

In poetry, Madelyn Boudreaux 
won first place, William R. Murphy, 
II won second place, and Megan Lar- 
penter won third place. Five unranked 
honorable mentions go to Jason S. 
Martin, Neil A. Ponthieux, Michelle 
Gremillion, Liz Bonnette, and Kathryn 
Namce. 

In fiction, Randall Pleasant won 
first place, Jan Sweat won second 
place, and Peter Rolufs won third 
place. One honorable mention in fic- 
tion goes to Brian Atkinson. 

First place in personal essays 
goes to H. Scott Jolley. Liz Bonnette 
won second place, and Vera Dyess 
won third place. 

Argus would like to congratu- 
late the winners and thank all who 
participated in the competition. Spe- 
cial thanks go to those faculty mem- 
bers who undertook the difficult task 
of judging: Dr. Sara Burroughs, Dr. 
Roland Pippin, Bill Robert, Dr. Bill 
Nelles, and Alice Bosworth. 

Freshmen 

The freshman class will be host- 
ing a fall dance for all freshmen from 
8 p.m. to midnight on November 16 at 
the Rec. Complex. 

Purple Jackets 

Purple Jackets will have a meet- 
ing on Thursday, November 17, at 5 
p.m. in the Student Union. 



ROTC Dinner 

NSU's Department of Military 
Science and U.S. Army Senior Re- 
serve Officers' Training Corps de- 
tachment will hold its annual "dining 
in" event at the Holiday Inn on Tues- 
day, November 15. 

Eighty-four Northwestern 
ROTC cadets will participate in the 
formal military dinner, which is sched- 
uled to begin at 6:30 p.m. 

LTC Royal A. Brown, professor 
of military science and director of the 
ROTC program at Northwestern, said 
the military "dining in" activity is a 
formal dinner even held within a unit 
to promote camaraderie among the 
junior and senior officers. 

The 1988 "dining in" event will 
afford cadets an opportunity to prac- 
tice their social graces and etiquette. 
Retribution for misconduct will be 
handed by Mr. Vice and the President 
of the Mess. 

Punishment, which is given due 
to a violation of the rules of the mess, 
could include trips to the ceremonial 
punch bowl, as well as a public debut 
as a singer or animal trainer. 

The event will end with tradi- 
tional social games such as "boat 
races" and "wine bottle juggling." 

For more information, contact 
the Department of Military Science at 
Northwestern, 357-5156. 



Parking 

New hours for open zones for 
parking will be 3 p.m. through 7 a.m. 
Open zones for parking do not include 
spaces designated for handicapped 
loading zones and 15 minute parking. 

Due to the increasing problem of 
speeding on campus, University Po- 
lice will have areas on campus under 
radar protection. 

Tri-Sigma 

Sigma Sigma Sigma would like 
to congratulate Olivia Maroma on 
being selected as Employee of the 
Week at Shoe Town. 

Tri-Sigma would also like to 
congratulate the recipients of awards 
given out Wednesday, November 10. 
They are: Gretchen Giering, Pledge 
Appreciation Award; Karen Engeron 
and Leigh Ann Tabor, Best Big Sis/ 
Lil Sis Combination; Beth Bowman, 
Most Scholarly; Stephanie Causey, 
Most Outstanding Pledge; Elizabeth 
Lindner, Most Spirited Pledge; and 
Rhonda Regouffre, the Violet Award. 

Rowing Team 

Anyone interested in joining the 
rowing team can contact Robb Brown, 
357-5971, or write NSU Box 4171. 



SAB 
Presents 




Nov. 17, 1988 
7:00 - 10:00 p.m. 




$2.00 per person 
$3.00 couple 



LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 

Henry Cho-Comedian 
Demon Dazzlers-Dance Act 

Ball Room, Student Union 






If you haven't had 
a mammogram, 
you need more 

than yourWeasts 
examined. 



I AMERICAN 
CANCER 
SOCIETY 



t; 




Give yourself the chance of a lifetime. 

A mammogram is a 
safe, low-dose X-ray that 
can detect breast cancer 
before there's a lump. In 
other words, it could save 
your life and your breast. 

If you're a woman 
over 35, be sure to schedule 
a mammogram. Unless 
you're still not convinced 
of its importance. 

In which case, you 
may need more than your 
breasts examined. 

Find the time. 
Have a mammogram. 

Created as a public service 
by DDB Needham 



Cotton 




Hwy 1 By-Pass 



Natchitoches, LA 



GO 




DEMONS 



Chicken Finger Basket 

And Medium Drink 

BUY 1 GET 1 FREE 




Must pay sales tax & 7% service charge. 
May not be used in conjunction with any 
other offer. Limit 1 coupon per customer 
per visit. Expires November 21.1988 




OPEN 24 HOURS 

357-8198 







DECEMBER 6, 1988 NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY VOL. 77, NO. 18 















OF LOUISIANA 

We wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! 






Constant fun 1 




auk MMfe^MfiaB mts. HWH* 





A Christmas Festival adventure 



By KAREN ENGERON 
Staff Writer 

Upon going to my regular Cur- 
rent Sauce staff meeting, I thought I 
would receive an ordinary, dry topic 
io cover. Well, lo and behold, I was 
(given the pleasure of reporting on my 
involvement with the Christmas Fes- 
tival and Lights as a spectator. 

I decided to prepare myself for 
the festivities on Saturday by going 
out on Friday , Christmas Festival Eve. 
With numerous parties going on, I 
chose to go to a party at a sorority 
,gster's house. After many toasts to 
people, events, times in our lives, 
idifferent kinds of trees, and pet rocks 
jwe had lost when we were little, I must 
say I started feeling mighty chipper! 
(For some reason, I thought I could 
handle more partying. My friends 
forced me to go out some more. Okay, 
I actually went very willingly. I 



thought to myself, where would be a 
great place to go? 

The Student Body was our des- 
tiny. The place was packed! People 
were everywhere! The music was 
blaring! How could I leave my friends 
with a beer bust going on, how could 
I refuse? Well, I decided to stay, only 
because my friends needed me, you 
understand. 

After being there an hour, meet- 
ing plenty of people, and making 
numerous trips to the bathroom, I felt 
like dancing. My partner and I walked 
to the dance floor hoping to find a spot 
to dance. The only spot we could find 
was under the speaker on the wall. 
This left us a total of about two feet. I 
told him I would take a rain check on 
the dance. Later, I got up the nerve to 
dance again. Well, this guy and I go to 
dance, I see some of my friends on the 
dance floor, rush to them, lose my 



partner, and wind up dancing with 
three girls and a wall. 

That little incident told me it 
was time to go home. Luckily, I was 
not the designated driver for tonight. I 
got to the dorm and barely made it up 
the four steps in the front, threw my 
purse down, tore my coat off, kicked 
off my shoes, and fell face down onto 
my bed. 

Waking up Saturday morning 
was an adventure in itself. I woke up, 
still face down, withmyalarm scream- 
ing at me. I felt as if someone had 
surgically planted the alarm in my 
head over night. After I turned the 
alarm off, I decided to get up and get 
ready for the Lights. 

After slowly getting ready, my 
friends and I walked to the parade site. 

FestivaL.continued on 



page 2 



"Very excited about the trip" 

Smith to lead London excursion 



By H. SCOTT JOLLEY 
Staff Writer 

"I'm very excited about the trip," 
said Mr. Tony Smith, professor of 
Music and Theatre Arts, of the up- 
coming excursion to London with 
"JSU's foreign study program North- 
western Abroad. 

Smith, who will be leading up to 
12 students on the trip, has an optimis- 
tic outlook for the overseas class. 
With the program, people have a 
chance to live in what we learn in Fine 
Arts 1040. They will see the plays, 
they will hear the music, they will go 
to the museums that we only talk 
about." 

Among the sights to be viewed 
an the 14 day trip will be Parliament, 
the British Museum, the Tate Gallery 
which houses a major exhibition of 
Impressionism including works of J. 
W.Turner, and Big Ben. "We'll trying 
to get tickets for Phantom of the Op- 
tra, but if we can't get it, we'll try for 
Us Miserable*," said Smith of the 
choices for the plays the group will 



see. There will also be ample free 
time for those who wish to enjoy the 
social life of London — among other 
things, trips can be made to the world- 
famous Harrod's for shopping. 

Two side-trips will be taken 
during the two week stay. "The first 
will be out to Salisbury, where we ? ll 
see Stonehenge." said Smith, adding, 
"I don't think we could go to England 
and not see Stonehenge." After tak- 
ing in the ancient monoliths of the 
Druidic circle, another side-trip will 
go to Stratford-on-Avon, the birth- 
place of the Bard, William 
Shakespeare. "While we're at Strat- 
ford, we' 11 see a professional perform- 
ance of one of his plays," said Smith. 
"We'll also try and see something by 
Shaw." 

Before the group leaves for 
England, they will spend a two day 
seminar talking about the expecta- 
tions of the trip and what they will 
encounter. 

Students will reside in a Univer- 
sity of London dormitory and, as an 



extra that will allow them greater free- 
dom in the city, will be provided with 
a pass that gives access to the London 
underground metro system and double 
decker buses. 

Those participating in the North- 
western Abroad program on August 
1-14, 1989, will receive 3 credit hours 
for the Fine Arts 1040 course, a core 
requirement for all NSU students. The 
cost for the trip is $1,685, which in- 
cludes: airfare from Houston airport 
(Northwestern transportation will 
probably be provided to Houston) to 
London's Gatwick Airport; accom- 
modations at the University Residence 
Hall in London; all land transporta- 
tion, including Stonehenge and Strat- 
ford-on-Avon; tickets to all required 
activities, events, and sites that charge 
for admission; and passes for the 
London Underground and bus rides. 

Not included in the price pack- 
age are: passports; daily lunch and 

Smith.. .continued on 
pa%e2 




Filled to the brim with eager spectators awaiting the 
main parade, the Kappa Alpha house mills with activity. 




Always sure crowd-pleasers. the Northwestern Cheer- 
leaders spur on the already ecstatic parade watchers. 



Early registration aids students 



By SHANNON J. GREER 
Staff Writer 

Approximately 2,000 North- 
western students have avoided those 
big headaches and long lines at regis- 
tration by obtaining their schedules 
for the Spring 1989 semester during 
early registration. 

Early registration began on 
November 7 and lasted until Friday, 
December 2, during which time stu- 
dents were able to get a copy of all 
classes that are available for the next 
semester and make their schedules. 

Early registration differs from 
preregistration in that during prereg- 
istration a student had to pay $25 to 
get a "hold" for his classes. Early reg- 



istration requires no payment of fees. 
All monies will be paid by the student 
during regular registration in January. 

Those students who have not 
done so need to go by the Registrar's 
Office and pick up their completed 
schedules. If a class was closed, the 
Registrar's Office will try to make 
section changes during this week. 

During regular registration in 
January, a student who needs to drop 
and/or add a class must do so by 
following the alphabetical order by 
which registration will be handled. 
Schedule changes will not be made 
out of order. 

Linda Tabor of the Registrar's 
Office urges students to pay all tickets 



and library dues before the end of this 
semester. She said students who have 
not taken care of their obligations will 
have problems at the beginning of the 
Spring semester. 

Students should also check to 
make sure there are no holds on their 
records. If there is indeed a hold on a 
student's record, it will be printed on 
the schedule card. 

Regular registration will be set 
up the same as it was this semester. 
Students who failed to register early 
will be able to pick up their schedule 
cards either from their advisor or in 
the Student Union Ballroom. Bills 
and completed schedules should be 
picked up in the ballroom also. 




LAD's Fall a hit 



*hiian Domingue works on the Kappa Alpha Christmas 
*"idow, which won first place in the competition. Second 



ce went to Sigma Kappa and the Association for Student 



•sts took third. 



NATCHITOCHES— The Lei- 
sure Activities Department's Fall 
schedule of events concluded with 
record participation in its team bowl- 
ing competition. Over one-hundred 
students, faculty and staff comprising 
18 teams competed for bowling hon- 
ors. Competition in the Greek League 
was intense, as it has been all semes- 
ter. At the end of the first day Tau> 
Kappa Epsilon held a commanding 
145 pin lead over second place Kappa 
Sigma. The second day saw Kappa 
Sigma make a great comeback only to 
fall two points shy of catching up with 
TKE. The Tau Kappa Epsilon team 
members were Damon Land, Joe Roy, 
Mitch Homsby and Scott Warner. 

The Open League winners in a 
come from behind effort were the 
Diamond Demons. This savvy group 
consisted of Sonny Terrill, Jim Gate- 
wood, Doug Sands and Kevin Cox. 
The Diamond Demons not only won 
their league but also had the highest 
four-game pin total of all participat- 
ing teams. 

The winners of the Women's 
Dorm League were the Lady's of 
Sabine. This team was comprised of 
Tammy Affletranger, Cindy Affle- 
tranger, and Pam Broussard. In the 
Women's GreekLeague Sigma Kappa 
who trailed Tri Sigma by 2 pins at the 
end of the first day, came storming 
back the second day to win by 54 pins 



and accumulate the highest four-game 
pin total of the women's teams. 

After a semester of furious 
competition the point standings are as 
follows: Men's Greek: Kappa Al- 
pha, 236; Kappa Sigma, 230; TKE, 
185; Sigma Tau Gamma, 167; Theta 
Chi, 141; Omega Psi Phi, 109; Phi 
Beta Sigma, 61; Alpha Phi Alpha, 60; 
and Kappa Alpha Psi, 53. 

Men's Open: Slaughter House 
Gang, 128; Troop One, 124; Nuthin' 
Fancy, 113; Diamond Demons, 110; 
ROTC, 103; Bruise Brothers, 82; Over 
Kill, 70; Kappa Sigma #2, 67; Spike it 
hard, 49; French Club, 41; Wesley 
foundation, 41; BSU Believers, 36; 
Other Guys, 28; KNWD, 26; Ghost 
Busters, 25; Kappa Alpha #2, 20; 
ROTC Cadets, 20; and Troop One #2, 
20. 

Men's Dorm: Nature Boys, 
105; Bossier Hall, 94; Blues, 80; New 
Orleans Crescent, 77; Bushwackers, 
63; Rapides, 61; The Scrubs, 57; 
Bossier Hall #2, 41; and Busters, 37. 

Women's Greek League: 
Sigma Sigma Sigma, 243; Phi mu, 
193; and Sigma Kappa, 192. 

Women's Open: TappaKegga 
Lite, 154; Hooperettes, 137; Lady 
Dream Team, 75; Tri Sigma #2, 40; 
ROTC Best, 38; and Dura Maters, 35. 

Women's Dorm: Sabine 3rd/ 
Adidas, 120; Natchitoches Hall, 67; 
Sabine Spikers, 51; Gutterbugs, 38; 
and Boozeman, 20. 



Fall Final Exam 
Scheldule 



Thursday, December 8 

8- 10:30 a.m. 10 a.m. MWF and Daily 
12- 2:30 p.m. ENGL 0910, 0920, 1010, 1020 
3:30- 6 p.m. 3 p.m. MWF and Daily 

Friday, December 9 

8- 10:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m. TR 
12-2:30 p.m. 12:30 p.m. TR 
3:30-6 p.m. 3:30 p.m. TR 

Saturday, December 10 

8-10:30 a.m. 1 1 a.m. MWF and Daily 
12- 2:30 a.m. 12 a.m. MWF and Daily 

Monday, December 12 

8- 10:30 a.m. 9 a.m. MWF and Daily 
12- 2:30 p.m. 2 a.m. MWF and Daily 
3:30- 6 p.m. 2 p.m. TR 

Tuesday, December 13 

8-10:30 a.m. 8 a.m. TR 
12- 2:30 p.m 8 a.m. MWF and Daily 
3:30-6 p.m. Unscheduled Exams 

Wednesday, Decemberl4 

8-10:30 a.m. 1 p.m. MWF and Daily 
1 2-2:30 p.m. 4 p.m. MWF and Daily 



PAGE 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



DECEMBER 6, 1988 



NEWS 



SI 



Ni 



Northwestern, Duke 
join for gifted students 



BY ELIZABETH McDAVID 
Staff Writer 

Northwestern State University 
and Duke University in North Caro- 
lina have announced that Northwest- 
ern will be the site of a cooperative 
effort, the ADVANCE Program 
(TAP), to assist the education of gifted 
young students participating in the 
Talent Identification Program (TIP). 

The program is limited to sev- 
enth grade students who are currenUy 
participating in the annual Duke Uni- 
versity Talent Search. Eighth and ninth 
grade students who have previously 
participated in Duke searches are also 
eligible. Duke University TIP offi- 
cials will select students who have 
attained a high score on the SAT or 
ACT as seventh graders. These stu- 
dents will participate in a state Recog- 
nition Ceremony. The Louisiana Rec- 
ognition Ceremony will be held in 
Natchitoches at Northwestern. The 
highest scoring students will then be 
asked to attend a summer residential 
program at Duke University TIP or on 



the Northwestern campus in coopera- 
tion with HP. 

The three week fast paced pro- 
gram will last from July 9, 1989 to 
July 29, 1989. The 1989 session at 
Northwestern will offer Pre-Calcu- 
lus, Expository Writing, Latin, and 
Pascal. Faculty will come from the 
Louisiana Scholars' College, the 
Louisiana School for Math, Science 
and the Arts, and outside distinguished 
learning institutions. The students will 
live in residence halls and participate 
in activities on campus. 

According to Linda Tabor, NSU 
Registrar, the program will be the 
only one of its kind in the state and 
among the few in the nation. Thirty 
second commercials are airing all over 
the state to advertise the program. 
"We want students to realize that there 
is a first rate program in our state. We 
need to stop exporting our talented 
students. Northwestern would like to 
continue the emphasis that we want to 
serve students that want challenges." 
Tabor said. 





UNIVERSITY PHARMACY 
AND GIFTS 

926 College Avenue • Natchitoches, Louisiana 71457 
John * Fays Pries, Owners 



Bobby Waggoner, R.Ph. 

*' Bus. 352-9740 
Res. 352-4246 



Alvln OeBlleux, R.Ph. 

Bus. 352-9740 
Res. 352-4923 



HOURS: MON-FRI, 8a.m.-6p.m.., SAT 8a.m. -5p.m 



Northwestern students showed their support for the De- 
mons last week by cheering on the team with painted cars. 



Smith. ..continued from page 1 



dinner except during the flight to and 
from England; and the NSU tuition 
fee for the course. For those students 
who have already taken Fine Arts 
1040 but still would like to go to 
London, contact Mr. Smith at 357- 
4522 for information about a fall tui- 
tion credit. 

The deadline for the first pay- 



ment of an initial non-refundable $200 
has been extended to January 10, 1989. 
The balance can be paid later on in the 
year. The payments are on a first 
come, first serve basis. For more 
information, contact either Mr. Tony 
Smith at the above number or Dr. 
Grady Harper, director of Northwest- 
em Abroad, at 357-6565. 



! Festival.. .continued from page 1 



I had already missed the children's 
parade, so I figured 1 out of 2 ain't 
bad. We saw the floats, NSU queens, 
visiting queens, yell leaders, and all 
the bands start to assemble the parade. 

Walking down Second Street, I 
wondered where I would stand. I 
walked by a group of Kappa Sigmas 
who looked like they were recovering 
from their Christmas Party the night 
before, a couple of Sig Tau pledges, 
some TKE's, and then, I found the 
place to watch the parade — the Kappa 
Alpha mansion on thehill. There were 
red beans and rice to eat, beer to drink, 
and men to meet. Plenty of people 
were there. Lots of greeks - Tri- 
Sigma's, Sigma Kappa's, Phi Mu's, 
Theta Chi's, TKE's, LSC students, 
alumni, and faculty were there to enjoy 
the celebrations. 

We all watched the parade and 
screamed at everyone that went by, 
whether we knew them or not. 

During the parade, the North- 
western Demon's game was on the 
television. Many people were watch- 
ing that as well as the parade. Unfor- 
tunately, the Demons were defeated. 
But all was not lost. The fireworks 
started at the very last seconds of the 
game. Those watching the game ran 
to see the fireworks. I walked down to 
Front Street to watch as well. The 
oohs and aahs were the same after 
every display. The lights were turned 
on and out-of-towners clapped at the 
beauty while local teenagers said, "Bid 
deal, it's the same s%#$ every year." 
I thought to myself, oh well, they will 
appreciate it all one day. 

When the crowds started to fizzle 
out, I had to run down and treat myself 
to a FUNNEL CAKE! ! ! ! Oh yeah, and 
look at the lights. Many NSU organiza- 
tions had booths selling everything from 
pickles to their rendition of the Natchi- 
toches meat pie. Oh, and of course, 
Skippy Waters, a Kappa Sig alumni, 
was making quite a fortune off of his 
Christmas Lights buttons. 

Afterwards, there were so many 
things to do and so many parties to go 
to, I couldn ' t decide which one to go to, 
so I decided to call it a night. As I laid 
in my bed, getting ready to pray for 
whatl wanted forChristmas, Icouldn't 



think of a better way for anyone to start 
off the Christmas holidays than to have 
a celebration of the Natchitoches Christ- 
mas Festival. 



RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 



ROAD 




YOUR UNCLE WANTS 
TO PAY FOR COLLEGE. RUT ONLY 
IF YOU'RE GOOD ENOUGH. 

Army ROTC scholarships pay tuition 
and provide an allowance for fees and 
textbooks. Find out if you q ualif y 




ARMY ROTC 



THE SMARTEST COLLEGE 
COURSE TOUCAN TAKE. 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON ROTC 
CALL OR WRITE 
PROFESSOR OF MILITARY SCIENCE 
NSU, NATCHITOCHES, LA. 71497 
PH: 357-5156 




You're in 
the Money! 





GET "TOP DOLLAR" FOR 
USED TEXTBOOKS 




University Bookstore 
Wed., Thurs., Fri. 

Dec. 7, 8, 9 
Mon„ Tues., Wed. 

Dec. 12, 13, 14 
8:30a.m.-4:30p.m. 



SGA MINOTES 
November 26, 1988 
The faceting was called to order by Vice president Andy 
Harrison. The pledge was led by Brian Shirley and the 
prayer by Ron Wise. Absent were Robb Brown, Billy Crarr 
ford, Henry Dibrell, Carol Jordan, Fredrick Perkins, Dan 
Pickett and Shwu-Fen- Lee. 

COMMITTEE REPORTS 
Housing Committee, Sarah Robinson (chairman) 'me 
coiwnittee met and aramended 8805 to say: the first time a 
student is lacked out af his dorm roam, he is let back it 
with a warning. 
The amendment was passed. 

BILL VOTE a yea 

3 nay 
1 abstain 

OFFICERS:' REPORTS 

PRESIDENT (Micheal McHale} SGA Christmas party will 
be after next week's meeting. Where is the key to the sug- 
gestion boxes and have they been checked this semester. 
We need to let the students know about the PASS System and 
how it works. We need to begin thinking about things to 
do in the spring . The SGA needs to do more community service 
projects. 

SECRETARY (John Walsh} I do not mind if people go 
into my office but please lock the door behind you. The 
answering machine was stolen over the break. 

COMMISSIONER OF ELECTIONS (Micheal Mason) If the SGA 
door is locked just go down to the, SAB office and ask Mr. 
Henry to open it. I hope to have a tenative schedule of 
elections for the spring next week. 

VICE PRESIDENT (Andy Harrison) I have lots of ideas 
for bills, come see me if you do not know how to write one. 
All bills in committe are due back next week, 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Vic the Demon was discussed. Why was he not at the SFA game. 
McHale reported on the meeting he had with Mr. Brent and 
Mrs. Beasley. In essence, you get what you pay for and we 
only paid six hundred dollars. 
ADJOURNMENT Respectfully Submitted 

John C. Walsh 

Secretary 



By CH 
Sports 

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climb," 
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to the p 
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pronoun 



Christmas Specials 

Selected NSU Sweat Shirts 
1/2 OFF 
Stocking Stuffers 
priced from 
$1.25 & up 
Dec. 7-14 

Happy Holidays!! 

from your 

University Bookstore 



By CHI 

Sports V 
Th 

mons, a 
featers o 
laid plar 
Moscow 
Afi 
title and) 
cos in tli 
Division 
had plan: 
Ho 
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BODY 



H A T C N I 



Wednesday, December 7 
at Antoo n's Liquor Store 

12 oz. Draft 500 All Night 
MAGARITAS & 

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2for$1 8-11 

Thursday, December 8 
$4 Beer Bust 

50 1 TROPICAL SCHNAPS 
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$1 Collins Drinks 

Friday, December 9 
50$ Bar Drinks 
( from 9 to 11) 
1 602. DRAFT $1 



NOI 

western St 
leading sa 
■andConfe 
league offi 

Smit 
MVP, had 
into last n 
University 
guard has 
Nark form 
with five (i 
Centenary 
°f the Cen 
has conver 
Pointers thi 

Smith 
Mention all 
year. 



Resum 
Profe 
docun 

sheets, 



DECEMBER 6, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 3 



SPORTS 



NSU rallies too late in Idaho fifl^K 



By CHRIS McGEE 
Sports Writer 

The "Road Warriors" from 
Northwestern State were presented 
with an almost inconceivable task in 
Moscow, Idaho Saturday afternoon. 

Following a first quarter full of 
bleeps, blunders, and not-so-practical 
jokes, those heroic masters of road 
success found themselves staring 
down the barrel of an unfeasible 28-3 
deficit to the nation's top-ranked 
Division I-AA team, the Idaho Van- 
dals. 

Refusing to surrender, the 
Demons took to conquering that 
Vandal mountain, but saw their ef- 
forts and their season fall short of the 
peak 38-30. 

"It was a hard mountain to 
climb," confessed Northwestern field 
general Sam Goodwin. "We just got 
to the peak and couldn't get all the 
way up. It was an uphill battle all the 
way." 

Originally, it appeared as if the 
Demons wouldn't even get their ex- 
pedition to that peak underway as they 
were exposed to a freeze despite per- 
forming indoors. That's "freeze" as 
in Vandal quarterback John Friesz, 
pronounced as freeze. 



Friesz fired frozen ropes to wide- 
open receivers for the duration of the 
first-half, placing the banged-up 
Demon secondary in shackles. Di- 
recting his Vandals to a 28-3 lead after 
the first quarter and a 35-24 advantage 
at half time, Friesz racked Northwest- 
em for 284 yards passing and 4 scor- 
ing tosses on 17-22 passing, a true 
career day for some of his counter- 
parts. 

Things looked promising early 
as the Demons drew first-blood on a 
Keith Hodnett 20 yard field-goal with 
11:38 left in the first frame. That 
score polished off a 7 play, 61 yard 
drive in which the Demons stymied 
Idaho's defense with successful exe- 
cution of the option attack. 

However, it was then that the 
Demons began descending from the 
proverbial penthouse to that cursed 
outhouse. It was also then that Friesz 
went to work. 

Friesz found his streaking re- 
ceiver, Dunn, down the far sideline 
for a 56 yard reception. Three plays 
later, Friesz hit John Jake in the back 
of the endzone for the score. 

The Demons' Paul Frazier 
botched a pitchout from Scott Stoker 
on the next series, and the Vandals 



recovered the fumble. Utilizing a 17 
yard pass gain to Jake, Friesz led his 
troops to the Demon 1 where Harris 
leaped over the heap of NSU defend- 
ers for the touchdown. 

Fright-nightwas only beginning 
for the Demons when tailback Ken- 
neth DeWitt couldn't find the handle 
to another Stoker pitch. The Vandals 
pounced on the loose ball at the Demon 
34. 

Keeping true to form, Idaho 
wasted little time in finding the 
endzone when Friesz hooked up with 
Allen in the right-flat on the drive's 
third play. Allen took the baton from 
there and outscooted Demon defend- 
ers 31 yards to the endzone for a 21 -3 
margin. 

The Demons could have opened 
a bakery shop with the number of 
turnovers they were creating. Tight 
end Orlan Lockhart absorbed a jolting 
hit from a Vandal defender following 
a catch, fumbling at the Demon 48. 

Throwing passes of 19 and 20 
yards to Jake and Dunn, Friesz 
marched his unit to the Demon 14, 
where he once again administered the 

Idaho., .continued 
on page 6 



Demons' season a success story 



By CHRIS McGEE 
Sports Writer 

The Northwestern State De- 
mons, authors of valiancy and de- 
featers of adversity, saw their finely- 
laid plans come crumbling down in 
Moscow, Idaho last Saturday. 

After claiming the conference 
title and whipping Boise State's Bron- 
cos in the first-round of the NCAA 
Division I-AA playoffs, the Demons 
had plans. Big plans, baby. 

However, aspirations of a na- 
tional championship were abolished 
by those pass-happy Idaho Vandals. 
The Demons, with a mad fury, nearly 
caught those Vandals after trailing by 
as many as 25 points in the first quar- 
ter, but the gutsy effort fell just shy of 
the pinnacle for head coach Sam 
Goodwin's troops. 

The dreams of being crowned 
national champs might have met its 
demise in Idaho, but the magical 
memories and accomplishments of 
Northwestern 's best grid-iron team 
ever will liveon in the hearts of Demon 
coaches, players, fans, and students 
for a good while. 

The Demons lost any chance at 
gaining the title of National Champi- 
ons, but they gained so much more for 
a program on the rise, not to mention 
the great service to a developing uni- 
versity. 

These "Road Warriors" , a moni- 
ker bestowed upon these 1988 De- 
mons by daddy Goodwin, have set a 
new standard for NSU football. 

The Demons, who received little 



respect from the prognos ticators , went 
undefeated through a demanding 
conference slate en route to one of the 
team's foremost goals, a conference 
championship. 

Let's all keep in mind that this 
was the Demons' first venture into the 
postseason gala, the Division I-AA 
playoffs. Also, Northwestern de- 
fended their own backyard well, win- 
ning all five Turpin Stadium contests. 

Sparkling individual perform- 
ances were a way of Demon life in this 
1988 football season. Placekicker 
Keith Hodnett becameNSU'sall-time 
scoring leader, and quarterback Scott 
Stoker, a 5-8, 157 lb. jr., broke Bobby 
Hebert's single-season passing rec- 
ords. Who said little guys can't play 
this game? Of course, Hebert is now 
starring for the NFL's New Orleans 
Saints. 

Senior flanker Floyd Turner 
notched his share of receptions and 
dazzled us with vivacious jaunts to 
paydirt via reverses and bombs from 
Stoker. Look for the Mansfield native 
to get the opportunity to strut his stuff 
in the NFL next year, ala former 
Demon tailback John Stephens. 

Just as importantly, these 
Screamin' Demons helped put some 
pride back into a university that is 
starting to prosper. For players, fans, 
and students alike, it was good to be a 
Demon this fall. The spirit on campus 
glowed brightly as encouraging titles 
were shoe-polished to the rear wind- 
shields of many a student's car last 
week. This writer was not immune to 



this "spirit" attack, but that's fine by 
me. 

The 1988 success story of the 
Northwestern Demons will also help 
Goodwin in the rigid battles known as 
the recruiting war. It's an event that is 
frustrating to many coaches and one 
that has been a simple nightmare to 
Goodwin, who has had trouble con- 
vincing top recruits to come to North- 
western. 

However, that's likely to change, 
thanks to this season's success story. 
It's a simple fact that the important 
aspectof recruiting successfully is for 
a coach to promote the program to the 
athlete, and, as they say, there's no 
promotion like winning! 

Floyd Turner garnered all-Con- 
ference honors at wide receiver for the 
Demons, while Baton Rouge senior 
Leonard Parker represented NSU's 
defense at linebacker on the all-Con- 
ference squad. 

Offensive players earning sec- 
ond-team all-Southland Conference 
honors are as follows: quarterback 
Scott Stoker, tailback Paul Frazier, 
tight end Orlan Lockhart, and line- 
men Jeff Steers, Robbie Martin, and 
John King. 

Defensive end Henry Sibley 
made the second-team defense along 
with teammates Kevin Lewis and 
Dennis Smith. 

National title hopes may have 
died in Moscow, Idaho for seven of 
those honored Demons, but a new 
hope has been bom in Natchitoches, 
Louisiana. 



Smith gains honors 



NORTHWESTERN— North- 
western State's Pernell Smith, NSU's 
leading scorer, was named the South- 
landConference'sPlayerof the Week, 
league officials announced Monday. 

Smith, the Century-Cellunet 
MVP, had averaged 22 points headed 
into last night's contest against the 
University of Houston. The 6-2 senior 
guard has already set a single game 
■nark for most three pointers in a game 
with five (in seven attempts) against 
Centenary in the championship game 
°f the Century-Cellunet Classic and 
Aas converted 46.1% of all his three 
Pointers this year. 

Smith was also an honorable 
Mention all Southland selection last 
year. 



f 



s 



I 



i 



Pernell Smith, Southland 
Conference Player of the 
Week. 



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Lady Demons 
basketball 

NORTHWESTERN— Fans 
from Natchitoches, as well as all stu- 
dents and faculty, can get their first 
look at the 1988-89 Lady Demons 
tonight when Mississippi College 
invades Prather Coliseum for a 7:00 
p.m. tip-off. 

NSU is 1 -2 for the year, but head 
coach James Smith isn't the least bit 
disappointed. "We're going to be all 
right," Smith says of his second squad. 
"We didn't receive consistent play 
from our big people or our guards, and 
that hurt us. Once we put it together, 
we'll be okay." 

Putting it together is what senior 
point guard Michelle Efferson has 
done so far this year. Efferson has 
averaged 12 assists per outing and is 
third on the team with her 1 1 .0 scoring 
average. Linda Grayson tops the team 
with 17.0 points per game with An- 
drea Carter second in scoring (11.3 
points per game) and first in rebound- 
ing (8.3). 

Northwestern State opened the 
season by beating the same Missis- 
sippi College squad it meets tonight, 
scoring a 92-80 decision in Clinton 
last Tuesday. After tonight's contest, 
NSU is off until a December 17 home 
showdown with Texas A&M 



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PAGE 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



DECEMBER 6. 1988 



[ 



EDITORIAL 




Writer criticizes student government association Local festival positive 

aspect of Natchitoches 



LET! 

Bah 



nn in n on f vm f t vi p~ p slow for me - However > il has th at small town charm that many 

s ^ w 1)601)16 only read about in ma s azines - Sure tnere is not a whole lot 

Off n er f things to do, and even fewer places to get a good meal, but there 

I'm so glad , as I'm sure most all of you are, that this is the are many things to be found here that can't be found anywhere 

last paper of the semester. This means that the semester is about else. 

to come to a long awaited end. I'll sta rt with the obvious, the Christmas Festival. I think that 

We've been through so much the past 15 weeks and had last Saturday's event was a huge success. It was one big party, 

some failures along with some successes. We still have a parking reminiscent of Mardi Gras. Maybe after three or four years it gets 

problem, and we still have to go to class everyday, but we've also boring for some people, but for new students, it's the biggest 

had an AIDS awareness seminar, and the registration process is event of the year. 

continually improving (hopefully!). I gu ess i wouldn't be fair if I didn't mention how beautiful 

Even though I try to point out the things that are wrong with Northwestern 's campus is, even with all of the trash lying all over 

the university, hoping they'll be improved, I seldom write it. Northern Louisiana has a big advantage over the southern part 

anything really positive about NSU. When I do write positive of the state because of the natural beauty of the land, 
things, people call me vile names, and tell me what garbage all The big reason why this year is an especially good time to be 

that sweet talk is. It' s true that I write mostly negative articles, but in Natchitoches is because next semester, the city will be cele- 

that's because I have a lot of trouble finding something positive brating its 275th anniversary, having been founded in 17 14 by St. 

to write about. Denis. 

Don't worry, though. I've found something this week. The city is planning a birthday party that will last most of the 



By BRAD BODENHEIMER 
Staff Writer 

I don't know how many of you 
read the minutes of the SGA meeting 
in last week's paper (I mean, how 
interesting can they be?!), but it was 
the first time the SGA hasn't violated 
its constitution. That's right, Article 
10, Section 2 of the SGA Constitution 
says that the minutes of each meeting 
are to be published in the Current 
Sauce. 

Last week was the first time all 
semester that the paper received any- 
thing from the SGA to publish. 

Granted, with Michael McHale 



just taking over as new president, it 
may have taken him a while to settle in 
and get organized. 

Even if everyone on the SGA 
was brimming with enthusiasm for all 
their new plans, someone should have 
taken the time to really understand the 
duties of their office and take the few 
minutes this tedious task requires and 
do it 

I'm glad to see that finally, in 
the second-to-last paper of the semes- 
ter, that the SGA decided to live by its 
constitution, especially after the last 
few years of simply doing what it 
pleases, legal or illegal. 



*EDITt 

Carol u 
children 
have be< 



Oddly enough, it's really something positive about Natchitoches 
itself, not Northwestern. I'll see what I can do. 

Now, I do realize that the majority of the students on this 
campus live in or around Natchitoches. Plus, a lot of them live in 
Shreveport and Alexandria, but for those who live a little farther 
away, Natchitoches must seem like just another little Louisiana 



semester. The various events may not attract as many people as 
the Christmas Festival, but that is why it should be even more 
exciting for Natchitoches residents. There won't be all of the 
traffic and crowds to contend with, leaving residents free to 
celebrate with each other. It'll be like one big block party! 



Sigma Delta Chi, the Potpourri, and the Current Sauce 

would like to thank the staff of the Kitsch for the 
lovely and festive addition to our Christmas window 
at the Student Union. Thanks for brightening up our 
holiday season with your gorgeous banner. 
Have a Merry Christmas! 



So during this holiday season, let's forget about the prob- 
town. It's actually a lot more than that. If you take a close look lems Northwestern has, and look forward to coming back to a 
at it, I think you'll find that Natchitoches is a great place to be spring full of excitement. It would be so easy to let the holidays f ¥ T13 *0 piyfTP -f\ ¥ JOT'IT C 
going to school, especially this year. slip away worrying about having to come back here, but why not -L \* IX JVH/I II J. \£ %J Xj X 11/ C5 

I'm sure those of you from Shreveport and New Orleans are be happy to return to a city where you can be part of a major 
saying to yourselves that I'm crazy. Being from New Orleans celebration or simply kick back by a lake and relax. Happy 



myself, I thought at first that this town was just too small and too holidays and I look forward to talking with you next semester! T 

Student creates Zen Buddhist Studies Society t 



Dear Editor, 

When I first arrived at Northwestern, I was exposed to a unique learning 
opportunity. This learning experience is not limited to the classroom but in all 
aspects of student life from the social and leisure activities where we learn 
about one another to the hard lessons of responsibility from which we gain 
valuable insight into the "real world." 

After a while, though, I felt there was something lacking. I feel a strong need 
to learn more about myself and reality. In short, I seek enlightenment Though 
I often feel alone and alienated in my quest, I believe there are others out there 
who feel the same as I do and I know there are many who can help me and many 
that I can help. 

I decided to open myself to scrutiny and probably attack in the hope of 
gaining the knowledge I seek. I am a student of Soto Zen Buddhism. I see Zen 
as a framework for learning and I hope to establish a Zen studies club for those 
who are willing to learn from others and willing to teach. 

It is my intention to establish a sanctuary for those who choose to travel 



What do you, as a Current 
Sauce staffer, want for 
Christmas? 



the path to enlightenment, a resource center for students, and forum for open 
discussion between members. I want it to be understood that this club would 
not be limited to matters only applicable to the study of Zen but anything 
which might further the cause of inner peace and enlightenment with the 
philosophy of Zen only an a guide, a rough model. 

Members would not be required or even expected to be Buddhist. They 
must only be mature, open minded, and wanting to learn. My goal is quite 
lofty, 1 am not a master and I have much to learn, but with plenty of help from 
other concerned students, it can be realized. 

If you have comments, suggestions, questions, concerns or (hopefully) 
want to help or join please write to me at NSU Box 4222 (if you want a reply, 
please include S ASE and I'll promptly respond.) Keep a look out for the Zen 
Studies Society; I will be getting the ball rolling soon. 





Morgan Allison 



frpfc fa fa V fc fri Vvfrfr$^3^Rr4^^^^H^ 




Sonya Rigaud 
Editor 

Journalism/Education 
Senior, Morgan City 

"A long, long nap." 



Michelle Weego 
Managing Editor 
Journalism 
Sophomore, Pineville 

"/ need an answering 
machine because I'm too 
busy working on this rag to 
receive any of my calls." 





fr\ $*\ fa ^^l^^^^i^^^ $3* 4** 



Current Sauce 



SONY A RIGAUD 
Editor 




MICHELLE WEEGO 
M anaging Editor 




MTNDY BECK BRAD BODENHEIMER SHANNON BOUFFANIE 
• BETH BOWMAN DeANNA COCHRAN KAREN ENGERON 
SHANNON J. GREER H.SCOTT JOLLEY LAURIE LeBLANC 
ELIZABETH McDAVTD CHRIS McGEE BRIAN McPHE ARSON 
ANNE MILLER CAROLINE WARD 
Staff Writers 


TIM JOHNSON RANDY JONES 
GLEN MOORMAN ROBERT ROUGEAU 
Photographers 


EVAN TAYLOR 
ALLEN Cartoonist 

EVANS 

Advertising SCOTTMILLS 

Advertising assistant 


EDD LEE 
Circulation/ 
Distribution 


DAMIAN DOMINGUE 
OLIVIA MAROMA 
Assistants to the editor 




TOM WHITEHEAD 
Adviser 





The Current Sauce is published weekly during the 
fat! and spring semesters by tr«stx^dentio^Norfhwes^' 
em State University of Louisiana., it is hot associated 
with any of the University & departments and Is fi- 
nanced irKiependentiy. 

The Current Sauce h based in the Office of 
&nt Publications iocafedln Kyser ha. The office 
of the editorial staff is 225H , telephone (318) 357-5456. 
The adviser's office is 103 Kyser HaH, telephone 3o7- 
S2ia. 

The maShg address for the Current Sauce 1$ P.O. 
Box 5306, NSU. Natchitoches. LA 71497. 

All correspondence, inciudlng fetters to the edi- 
tor is welcome. Materia? submitted for consideration 
must be mo#ed to the above address or brought to 
the Office. 

The deadline for ai! advertisement and copy is 3 
p m each Friday, inclusion ot any and cM material is 
toft to the discretion of the editor. 

lettert to the editor should be typed (double- 
spaced), signed and should include a telephone 
number whe*e the writer can be reached , No anony* 
mous letters wit! be printed. 

Current Sauce subscription rates are $11 per 
academic year (28 Issues) or $6 per semester (14 
issues), The paper is entered c» second-class mall at 
Natchitoches, LA. The USPS number Is 140-660. 



Allen Evans 
Advertising Manager 
Business Administration 
Junior, Natchitoches 

"T d like for businesses 
to turn in their ads before 
Monday night!" 



Karen Engeron 
Staff Writer 
Journalism 
Sophomore, Houma 

"A personal waxer of 
my very own." 





H. Scott Jolley 
Staff Writer 
Journalism 

Freshman, Natchitoches 

"A Monday paste-up 
night that lasts less than 
twelve hours, a Sonya Ri- 
gaud action figure with the 
kung-fu grip and...oh yeah, 
IT world peace!" 



Fall '88 



Caroline Ward 
Staff Writer 
Journalism 

Freshman, Woodlands, 
TX 

"/ think the main pri- 
ority for everyone, includ- 
ing myself, is new clothes to 
replace those ruined by the 
waxer. The main thing, 
however, is just to be home 
again with my family." 



4**r fa $*\ fa $ * \fa$*xfr\ Wk--W \- h -irfa 3*\ $Rr§*»-3 



Dear Editc 
This 
November 
mas Carol. 
profession! 

If Mi 
producing | 
alsofLRT 
the thanksl 
Current Sa 
page of th< 
Besid 
actual perfc 
a fantastic 
rehearse. E 
had dress r< 
I would alsi 
could never 
my child. 1 
Along 
by this artic 
owe them a 
In the 
image. LR' 
in this man 
DOUBLES 
Thani 
|f "profession 
v Sincerely, 
1 Rose Mary. 

1 

| Dear Mr. H 
1 lame 
Ji I am Emily 
V anastylettt 
No! I 
Signed, 
Tana (Emil 

Mr. Scott Jc 
All in 
100% better 
you? 
| David Johns 



Dear Scott J 
I'mgli 
wish you w< 
together. 
Sinserly (sic 
Chris Melde 
P.S. Bah Hu 

I Dear Mr. H. 

I am or 
i about. Persoi 
I sorry I have I 
| Yours untrul 
i Jana Whiteh< 

Dear "Mr. S 
Numtx 
Numb* 
Numlx 

Yours truly, 
> | Melissa Jam 

Dear Mr. Sci 
Bah Hi 
YouL> 
Not your frie 
Jennifer Ingr 

Dear Mr. H. 

We ha 
day. I don't i 
nance (sic) 1 
something li 
Sincerely, 
J ill A Whitel 

"ear Mr. H. 

You yc 
it's not just n 
Printed it as i 
Yours truly, 
Belinda Crac 

^ar Mr. H. ! 

We hav 
' 8°od progran 
; 'ours truly, 
'^ay Bernard 
' P -S.BahHun 



^Sir, 
< Consite 
{ Jtout. We ha 
1 S 'ncerely, 
Christina 
•S. Sorry ab 

PW H. Scotl 
We do i 
do not have a 



'°ur unhapp 
" a na Cedars 



DECEMBER 6, 1988 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGES 







— J 




ETTERS TO THE 


EDITORS 


































< 

> 



ve 
tes 



he SGA 
m for all 
uldhave 
stand the 
! the few 
tires and 

nally, in 
esemes- 
ivebyits 
- the last 
what it 



Bah Humbug! 

I Writer receives bad reviews from children, parent 



*EDITOR'S NOTE-Writer H. Scott Jolley wrote a review on LRT's version of A Christmas 
Carol in last week's edition of the Current Sauce. The play included performances by local 
children and Northwestern students in addition to the professional actors. The following excerpts 
have been taken from the numerous letters written in response to certain comments in the review. 



p 



iauee ; ; 
he 
dow 
oour 



=1 



Dear Editor, 

This letter is in reference to H. Scott Jolley's article "Local Talent Bogs Down Good Performance" in the 
November 29th issue of the Current Sauce concerning the Louisiana Repertory Theater's play The Dickens Christ- 
mas Carol. According to Mr. Jolley the NSU students and the local children who performed in the show ruined its 
professionalism. 

If Mr. Jolley were a more experienced critic, he would have heard the director, Mr. Hammack, state that 
producing this show involving local talent was LRT's Christmas card to the community and to NSU. The profession- 
als of LRT spent a lot of time and effort working with these young people. They did not have to do this. Instead of 
the thanks LRT should have received for its gift to NSU, Mr. Jolley's article was like a slap in the face. I feel that the 
Current Sauce has been totally irresponsible by blasting one person ' s biased opinion in bold headlines across the front 
page of the paper without checking the facts first. 

Besides being a NSU student, I'm also the mother of one of the young performers; therefore, my opinion of the 
actual performance is probably not very objective. Personally, I was amazed at the children's performance. They did 
a fantastic job. These young people deserve praise, not criticism. For two months they gave up their free time to 
rehearse. During Thanksgiving break they worked 10 to 1 1 hours, sometimes until 1 1 p.m. On Thanksgiving Day they 
had dress rehearsal until midnight to get ready for opening night. You could say they gave their all and then some. 
I would also like to say that the young people were, not paid one penny. The riches they gained from this experience 
could never be measured in money. There's no way I could adequately ever thank them enough for what they've given 
my child. This is a memory that these children will treasure always. 

Along with this letter to you, there are 1 8 letters to Mr. Jolley from the children themselves. They were very hurt 
by this article. Maybe after he reads their letters, he will take more care in the future. Personally, I think he and you 
owe them and LRT an apology. 

In the four years I've been a student at Northwestern, all I've heard is that NSU needs to build a new positive 
image. LRT is one of the best things to happen to this school in a long time. For the school newspaper to insult them 
in this manner is definitely no way to build the kind of image we need. So, SHAME ON YOU, Mr. Jolley, and 
DOUBLE SHAME on you, Current Sauce. 

Thank you for allowing me to express my viewpoint. I do hope your own performance will become more 
"professional." 
Sincerely, 
Rose Mary Jacob 

Dear Mr. H. Scott Jolley, 

I am eight years of age. I am very angry about what you wrote about the play. This is very insulting to our play. 
I am Emily in the play and concidering (sic) that I have a sort of leading roll, I am angry. Sorry to have wrote such 
a nasty letter. 

No! I forgot I am glad. 
Signed, 
Tana (Emily) 

Mr. Scott Jolley, 

All in all, I believe that you are an egotistical and inexperienced young writer, and that our "local talent" is 
100% better than you said it was. Anyway, you should be proud of the "local talent." You're a student at NSU, aren't 
you? 

David Johnson 



Dear Scott Jolley, 

I'm glad you are jolly about the play and a very jolly sole (sic). And you could not do any better yourself. I 
wish you would stop writting (sic). That was not very nice and if you tear this up Mary Poppins will put it back 
together. 
Sinserly (sic), 
Chris Melder 

P.S. Bah Humbug to you and a bad Christmas. 
| Dear Mr. H. Scott Jolley, 

I am only 1 1 years old, but I know plenty about being in a play. I don't think you know what you're talking 
i about. Personally I don't think you've seen the play, you've just heard rumors. I'm very disappointed. VERY! I'm 
j sorry I have to break it to you this way, but you are sort of a poor critic. Thanks a lot! 
J Yours untruly, 
[ Jana Whitehead 

Dear "Mr. Scrooge", 

Number one, you have no right to be a judge on our show. We may not be professionals, but we try hard. 
Number two, I think that even if you had these thoughts you should have kept them to yourself. 
Number three, you hurt some feelings. I think you owe us an apology. 
Yours truly, 
Melissa James 

Dear Mr. Scrooge, 

Bah Humbug! The reason I put dear Mr. Scrooge is you act like him. 
You Don't Know Anything About Plays At All!! 
Not your friend, 
j Jennifer Ingram 

Dear Mr. H. Scott Jolley, 

We have been working on this play for about 3 or 4 weeks and sometimes until midnight, usually 2 times a 
day. I don't appreciate the things you said, and I am sure many others don't also. Many viewers thought the prefor- 
■nance (sic) was very good, and you are very cruel to say these things, especially since you haven't ever worked in 
something like this. 
Sincerely, 

Jill A Whitehead (Phantom) 
Dear Mr. H. Scott Jolley, 

You yourself are "local talent" and you bogged down a great performance. I'm not being conceited because 
K's not just me who says this. I know a lady who came back to see it again. What really gets me steamed is that you 
Printed it as a fact and not an opinion. 
Yours truly, 

Belinda Crachit or Leslie Jacob 
^Mr. H. Scott Jolley, 

We have been working on this play for more than a month for long hours. Everyone else thought it was a very 
1 8ood program. You are crazy to say that. 
'Ours truly, 

PSf Bernard (Tiny Tim) 
\ S. Bah Humbug on you!!! 

kearSir, 

Consitering (sic) that you are only a college freshman you really don't know what the heck you are talking 
about. We have worked long and hard hours on this to make a good review for you. 
s »ncerely, 
Christina 

^•S. Sorry about calling you just a freshman because I'm just in 6th grade. 
keaxH. Scott Jolley, 

We do not slow down the show (YOU DO). I am very disappointed in you. VERY!!!! You are mean! If you 
^° not have anything to say nice, do not say anything at all! 
l * our unhappy friend 
w^T. T »na Cedars 



Dear H. Scott Jolley, 

Bah Humbug to your review on the Dickens Christmas Carol Show. We certainly do not appreciate your 
remark, "the 'local talent' bogged it down a bit." We happen to know what 'local talent' means. It means CHIL- 
DREN! It wouldn't look right if we had an adult to play the part of Tiny Tim, would it? If you write us back you'll 
probably tell us we should get used to bad reviews. I don't care! 
Mad Local Talent, 
Tiffany Roberson 

Dear H. Scott Jolley, 

You are unkind to think that the children bogged (whatever that means) the show down, and I'd like to see you 
do better. We worked very hard on this play. 
Your worst friend, 
Kyle Breedlove 
P.S. Bah Humbug 



DearH. Scott Jolley, 

You had no business putting that we slowed the play down. We tried to do our best to do this as good as we 
could. 

Your worst friend, 
Jeremy Melder 

Dear Mr. H. Scott Jolley, 

We Are Not Getting Paid! ! ! 

The actors (professional) told us we were Great! ! ! and the parents, friends also said so. I think if you worked 
as hard as we did you would have been hurt if somebody put it in the newspaper that they thought you did terrible. 

Tina Johnson 

I 




Its 
Christmas 
y*know! 



. If you think 

being a Christian is 
inconvenient today, 

just look back 1500 years. 

If you're ready to make the time and commitment that being a Christian sometimes requires, 
the Episcopal Church invites you to come and join us in the worship and fellowship of Jesus Christ. 

The Episcopal Church 




TRINITY PARISH CHURCH (EPISCOPAL) 
533 Second Street,' Natchitoches 

Telephone 352-31 13 affer 2:dt) PM or 352-7054, mornings -evenings 
Sunday Service 10:30 AM, with van pickup at Caddo, Bossier, 
Prudhomme, and Boozeman Dorms 
Sunday luncheons free for students, with van return to campus. 
Personal counseling available by appointment. 
Father Richard Taylor, Rector 



PAGE 6 






CURRENT SAUCE 


DECEMBER 6, 1988 


CAMPUS LINI 
































1 



Catholic Students 

Father Tom Jezak of Holy Cross 
Catholic Church will celebrate a 
Candelight Mass in the President's 
Room — Student Union on Tuesday, 
December 6 at 7 p.m. All students, 
faculty, staff and friends are invited. 
The mass is sponsored by NS U Catho- 
lic Students Organization. 

Sigma Kappa 

The sisters of Sigma Kappa 
would like to thank everyone who 
helped participate in the singing of 
Christmas carols last week at the 
Heritage Manor Nursing Home. 

Congratulations Delta Mu Chap- 
ter on winning second place in the 
window painting contest. 

Good luck on finals to everyone 
and Merry Christmas! 

Current Sauce 

There will no Current Sauce 
meeting today because of upcoming 
finals. The next meeting will be 
Monday, January 9, 1989, at 5 p.m. in 
225 Kyser. 

Staffers are reminded to attend 
the Christmas party at Editor Sonya 
Rigaud's house Wednesday at 6:30 
p.m. 

Kappa Alpha 

Kappa Alpha Order would like 
to congratulate several members for 
such a successful semester in the 
chapter. 

Our flag football team this 
semester for a 10-1 season. They 
were Greek champions as well as 
overall league champions. Congratu- 
lations also to our volleyball team 
with a Greek championship. 

Scholastically , Milton Constran- 



sitch received the Kappa Alpha Order 
Freshman ScholarshipCitation Award 
by maintaining a 4.0 grade point aver- 
age for his first semester as a pledge. 
This is a top honor in Kappa Alpha 
Order. 

Also Kappa Alpha would like to 
congratulate their new officers. They 
are: Bobby Cockrell, president; Butch 
Poteet, vice-president; Damian Dom- 
ingue, recording secretary; RangiLim, 
corresponding secretary; ShaneSmith, 
historian; Stephan Erath, treasurer; 
David Wolfe, parlimentarian; and 
Darryl Heck, sergeant-at-arms. And 
special thanks to past-presidentRandy 
Crow and his outstanding staff for 
such a successful and promising year 
for Kappa Alpha Order. 



ISEP 

The deadline for application to 
the ISEP program has been set for 
February 1, 1988. 

PhiMu 

Phi Mu would like to thank 
Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigma, Theta 
Chi and Tau Kappa Epsilon for then- 
outstanding participation in our 
Thanksgiving Phi Mu "Stock the 
Pots". 209 canned goods were col- 
lected and donated to the Natchito- 
ches Food Bank. Tau Kappa Epsilon 
donated 68 cans and received a plaque 
for collecting the most cans. 

Congratulations to our new offi- 
cers: president, Marlene Canfield; 
vice-president, Liz Borictte; record- 
ing secretary, Kristine Kennedy; cor- 
responding secretary, Susan Mullins; 
provisional membership director, 



Holley Methvin; treasurer, Stacey 
Kay; parlimentarian, Dana Liner, 
Panhellenic delegate, Katie Whitten 
and membership director, Andra 
Fuller. 

We wish our Alumnae well — 
new members include: Brenda Kay 
Bums, Melissa Canales, Chrissy 
Dunavent, Pam Perkins, Karen Tay- 
lor and Kelly Taylor. 

Phi Mu would like to wish ev- 
eryone a safe and happy holidays! 



NORTHWESTERN— On 
January 27, 1989, in the A. A. Freder- 
icks Fine Arts Auditorium, 19 NSU 
coeds will compete for the coveted 
title of Miss Lady of the Bracelet 
1989. Highlighting the event will be 
Miss Patricia Brant, Miss Louisiana 
1987. An accomplished ventriloquist, 
Miss Brant will perform her act that 
she presented at the Miss Louisiana 
Pageant and at the Miss America 
Pageant. 

The LOB committee is excited 
about having Miss Liz Swaine, a co- 
anchor for KTBS-TV channel 3 in 
Shreveport, as the mistress of cere- 
monies. Miss Swaine has served as 
emcee for several beauty pageants 
and will articulate the LOB program 
for that evening. 

Since it is celebrating the thirti- 
eth anniversary of the pageant, the 
LOB committee is very excited about 
the pageant this year. "It's going to be 
a real good show," said LOB chair- 
person Kim Wilson. "Our theme this 
year, 'Puttin' on theRitz,' lends itself 
to a more Broadway style of produc- 
tion and the show will not only be fun, 
but also enjoyable to watch." 



NSU Who's Who chosen 



NATCHITOCHES— Twenty- 
nine students at Northwestern State 
University have been selected for 
inclusion in the 1989 edition of Who's 
Who Among Students in American 
Universities and Colleges, an annual 
directory which recognizes them as 
national collegiate leaders. 

Northwestern 's nominating 
committee of faculty members and 
the editors of the publication selected 
the students on the basis of their aca- 
demic achievement, service to the 
community, leadership in extracur- 
ricular activities and potential for 
continued success. 

The 29 students from Northwest- 
em join an elite group of students 
selected from more than 1 ,400 institu- 
tions of higher education in all 50 
states, the District of Columbia and 
several foreign nations. 

Outstanding students have been 
honored in the annual directory direc- 
tory since it was first published in 
1934. 



Students named this year from 
Northwestern for inclusion in Who's 
Who Among Students in American 
Universities and Colleges are: Mar- 
iam T. Brown, senior, general psy- 
chology, New Orleans; Elaine 
Burleigh, senior, nursing, Opelousas; 
Melissa K. Canales, senior, mathe- 
matics education, Opelousas; Silvia 
Claud, senior, elementary teaching, 
Shreveport; Randall Crow, senior, 
business administration, Little Rock, 
Ark. 

Lynn D. Every, senior, nursing, 
Natchitoches; Latisha Anne Fair, 
senior, history, Natchitoches; Carole 
Hampshire, graduate student, history, 
Pineville; Kelley D. Henderson, sen- 
ior, elementary teaching, Fort Polk; 
Jill Horton, senior, elementary teach- 
ing, Many; David LaVere, graduate 
student, history, Baton Rouge. 

Patrick A. Leblanc, senior.nurs- 
ing, Shreveport; Aubra Lee, graduate 
student, history, Natchitoches; Shwu- 
Fen Lee, senior, computer informa- 



tion services, San Pedro, Sulu; Tessia 
Carla Lee, senior, nursing, Alexan- 
dria; Leah C. Luck, senior, English 
education, Natchitoches; Mary K. 
Mayo, senior, nursing, Shreveport; 
Mary Middlebrooks, graduate student, 
nursing, Shreveport; Leonard Parker 
Jr., junior, physical education, Baton 
Rouge. 

Gail F. Rabinowitz, senior, nurs- 
ing, Shreveport; Claire Cooper Re- 
bounce, graduate student, nursing, 
Bossier City; Kelley Robertson, jun- 
ior, business administration, South 
Charlseton, W. Va.; Cynthia R. Ross, 
senior, general psychology, Anacoco; 
Camille Shelf o Jr., senior, special 
education, Winnfield; Kellie Shotwell, 
senior, English education, Texas City, 
Tex.,; Carole Lynn Smith, senior, 
psychology, Baton Rouge; Laura 
Powell Strahan, senior, elementary 
teaching, Marthaville; and Rhonda 
Verzwvelt, senior, social science 
jducation, Alexandria. 



Idaho, ..continued 
from page 3 

touchdown pass to Jake, upping the 
score to 28-3 following Doyle's PAT 
at the 2:53 mark in the first quarter. 

The Demons began their search 
for the summit as they managed to hit 
paydirt in their next two possessions. 
Stoker threw scoring strikes of 20 and 
15 yards to DeWitt and Al Edwards, 
respectively to bring the Demons to 
within 11 at 28-17. 

Both teams exchanged touch- 
downs before the first-half shootout 
ended. The Demons went into half time 
with a renewed hope, trailing 35-24. 

The "freeze then turned against 
Idaho in the third quarter when North- 
western defensive end busted th t>ugh 
the Vandal line and leveled John 
Friesz. The gun it-at-will quarter- 
back suffered a severe ankle injury 
and was done for the day. The De- 
mons, who hadn't managed to muster 
up any semblanceofpreoSureonFriesz 
all day, now had a new outlook. 

"They finally le*. go of me," 
complained Thissel of Idaho's hold- 
ing theatrics. "I lined up a little wider 
to get some room to do the things I 
wanted to do." 

Following a 23 yard field goal 
by Idaho's Doyle, Hodnett drove home 
a 53 yarder with just under two min- 
utes left in the third quarter. That 
kick, the longest in Demon history, 
put the score at 38-27. 

The Demons could have com- 
pleted their m ission and won the game, 
but they proved to be their own worst 
enemy in a time they didn't need any. 



The Demons were flagged for 72 yards 
worth of penalties in the second-half. 
They all seemed to occur at the wrong 
time, too. 

In the final quarter, Stoker 
scrambled his way for an apparent 
touchdown, but a clipping call on 
center Jeff Steers nullified the score. 

"The penalties killed us," pro- 
claimed Lockhart. "What made them 
(Idaho) so good was our offense 
(making mistakes)". 



The last gasp for the Demons 
came with two minutes left and the 
Demons with the ball on the Vandal 7. 
The Vandals shut down the run on 
three plays, setting up a fourth and 
goal on the Idaho 4. 

Goodwin called for the option, 
andStokerobliged.runningwideright 
in hopes of finding success. How- 
ever, Stoker was sacked from behind. 
The end of the game for the Demons. 
The end to a dream, also. 











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CLASS OF 1989. 






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A< 

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WISH 

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JANUARY 17, 1989 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 
OF LOUISIANA 



VOL 77, NO. 19 



;h & 

Ex- 

nd 



. But 
panies 
11-paid 
it 

srve 

irkets, 

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ire is 



Wancho leaves SID position for Texas post 




Tom Wancho 



By H. SCOTT JOLLEY 
News Editor 

Tom Wancho will soon leave 
his post as Sports Information Direc- 
tor at Northwestern to become the 
first Director of Public Awareness 
and Communications for Special 
Olympics in Austin, Texas. 

While Wancho, who has been 
promoting NSU sports for six years, 
has enjoyed his time spent with the 
Demons, he is looking forward to his 
hew job. "It's the first time in the 
nation that there has been a position 
like this in Special Olympics," he said. 

"Texas is the biggest state in the 
country for Special Olympics and it's 
my job to make the entire state aware 
of what's going on." According to 
Wancho, Special Olympics differs 
from the international Olympics in 
that it is held almost every year with 



special events and activities that are 
continuously taking place. "We'dlike 
to make it as big as the regular Olym- 
pics, at least in the area of recogni- 
tion," Wancho said. 

Among the main objectives of 
his new position are promotional ac- 
tivities and news releases, something 
at which Wancho should excel. Dur- 
ing his term at Northwestern, he gained 
local and national attention for his 
media guides for the Demons and 
Lady Demons basketball teams. 

Wancho's first time in the me- 
dia spotlight was when he featured the 
1986 Northwestern basketball team 
in a Natchitoches graveyard with the 
title "Resurrected." The guide used 
macabre jokes and puns in its listings; 
for example, many of the players' 
statistics were on tombstones. 

After the guide was published, 



several television stations, mainly 
from Shreveport, mentioned 
Wancho's bizarre approach to publi- 
cizing his team. The 1986 media 
guide was also featured in Sports Il- 
lustrated, as was his next media guide 
for the Lady Demons. 

The 1987 media guide became 
the subject of much controversy when 
it was published — the Lady Demons 
wore bunny ears and cotton tails on 
the cover of the guid^, which had the 
tide "These Girls Can Play, Boy." 
That statement, along with suggestive 
stat listings ("Bust 36, Waist 24, 
Hips: yes.") and a centerfold of the 
fully-clothed team, brought com- 
plaints of sexism in the Sports Infor- 
mation. 

Although Wancho was blasted 
by USA Today, The Baton Rouge 
Morning Advocate, The Shreveport 



Times and other newspapers, he does 
not believe that the guide had a nega- 
tive effect. "It's a credit to myself and 
the office," said Wancho, who was 
defended by numerous people on 
campus, including several Lady 
Demons and NSU head football coach 
Sam Goodwin. "Look at other col- 
leges, Notre Dame and the like. They 
have bigger publications staffs and 
more resources, but we did this. In no 
way would they be able to do what 
I've done. No other SID has had two 
programs in Sports Illustrated." 

Wancho's new job begins on 
February 1 , giving him plenty of time 
to say goodbye to his friends here at 
Northwestern. "Working with NSU's 
coaches on a daily basis has been 
pretty rewarding," he said, adding 
"their families are my family." He 
said that he has enjoyed working with 



the people in the Sports Information 
office, especially "Rhenda Cedars, the 
secretary. She's like a mother to me, 
she worries about me all the time." 

Perhaps the person Wancho will 
miss most is Coach Goodwin, who he 
described as "an outstanding human 
being. If I ever had a daughter," said 
Wancho with a smile, "I'd want her to 
marry someone like Coach Goodwin." 

Wancho's replacement will be 
Doug Ireland, a 1987 graduate of 
Northwestern with extensive media 
experience, including stints as Sports 
Editor of the Current Sauce and the 
Alexandria Town Talk. He will be 
assisted by, in Wancho's words, "the 
ever-popular Bruce Groen," who 
served as Assistant Sports Informa- 
tion Director under Wancho. 



Admissions and Recruiting gains new director 



NTMENT 

rs pniomtY 

HX ONLY. 

S, LA. 71457 
\T. 9 3 

1988 



NATCHITOCHES— Dr. Sally 
Hunt, associate professor of home 
economicsandamemberoftheNorth- 
western State University faculty since 
1977, has been appointed acting di- 
rector of NSU's Office of Admissions 
and Recruiting. 

Dr. Hunt's appointment, which 
becomes effective immediately', was 
announced this week by Northwest- 
em president Dr. Robeit A. Alost. 

She succeeds Mrs. Georgia 
Beasley, who resigned in December 
to accept the position of coordinator 
of teacher evaluation with the Office 
of Teacher Internships at Louisiana 
State University in Baton Rouge. 
Dr. Hunt received the Doctor of 



Philosophy degree in home econom- 
ics education from Texas Women's 
University. She earned the Master of 
Science degree in home economics 
education from NSU and the Bache- 
lor of Science degree in vocational 
home economics education from the 
University of Oklahoma. 

In the Spring of 1988, Dr. Hunt 
was awarded an honorary member- 
ship in the Louisiana Association of 
the Future Homemakers of America, 
an honor which recognized her contri- 
butions and outstanding services to 
secondary home economics educa- 
tion. 

For the past several years, she 
has provided leadership for partici- 



pating high school home economics 
students in District III if the Louisiana 
Association of the FHA by coordinat- 
ing annual meetings for more than 
1,000 students from throughout the 
area. 

Dr. Hunt has also made signifi- 
cant contributions to secondary home 
economics education by providing in- 
service training for teachers in the 
area. She has been active in a project 
to establish a telecommunications 
network for home economics teach- 
ers to facilitate the exchange of in- 
structional materials and teaching 
strategies. 

She recently completed a re- 
search project with implications for 



improving the instructional program 
in parenthood education, a project 
designed to determine the effective- 
ness of the parenthood education, a 
project designed to determine the 
effectiveness of the Parenthood Edu- 
cation Curriculum Guide which she 
developed in 1983. 

Dr. Hunt also directed the 1988 
.sex Equity project poster, which fea- 
tured former NSU star and New Or- 
leans Saints quarterback Bobby Hebert 
and his two daughters, promoting 
parenthood education in Louisiana 
high schools. 

Dr. Hunt's other honors include 
being nominated for Northwestem's 



1988 Distinguished Faculty Award 
and being selected in 1987 to receive 
an honorary membership in District III M 
of the Louisiana Association of the 3 
FHA. 

She has served a two-year term as |J 
president of the Beta Kappa chapter of | 
Delta Kappa Gamma, the international 
professional sorority for women in 
education. 

Dr. Hunt, who was the NSU 
Department of Home Economics' out- 
standing faculty member in 1986, is a 
past president of the Central District of 
the Louisiana Home Economics Asso- 
ciation. 




Dr. Sally Hunt 



Financial Aid office 
introduces new form 




By SHANNON J. GREER 
Staff Writer 



In addition to the Application 
for Federal Student Aid, the Financial 
Aid office is offering a new, updated 
form for students who wish to apply 
or Pell Grants and other types of 
ederal student aid including student 
loans and College Work Study. 

The new form is called the ACT 
family Financial Statement and is 
•tocessed by the Americar College 
Testing Financial Aid Service. By 
"sing the updated form, students may 
"ow apply for a student loan and aPell 
Grant through one application. 

Northwestern Financial Aid 
Sector Terry Faust said, "We feel in 
financial Aid that introducing this 
n ew form will help our students in 
toany ways." 

One advantage of the ACT 
Family Financial Statement is that the 
Northwestern Financial Aid Office 
*iU be sent a financial aid report within 
'0 working days and the office can 
*ton processing a student's aid much 
^lier than if he uses the federal form 
Another advantage is that a stu- 
knt who uses the ACT form only 
"^ds to file that one application to 
a Pply for grants, College Work Study, 
^d loans. 

A student using the Application 
for Federal Student Aid is required to 
^bmit a second application for a stu- 
fentloan. 

A fee of seven dollars is paid to 
^CT for processing the Family Fi- 
nancial Statement 

For students applying for a Pell 
Gr ant only, the 1989-90 federal stu- 



dent aid application is available. This 
is the same form students have tradi- 
tionally used. Students are encour- 
aged to pick up the form of their 
choice now at the Financial Aid Of- 
fice. 

Faust said, "It is recommended 
that students encourage their parents 
to prepare their 1988 10-40 Federal 
Income Tax Form promptly in order 
that they may fill out the financial aid 
form as soon as possible." 

Married and single independent 
students should also fill out their tax 
forms immediately. 

"The ACT Family Financial 
Statement is used in most colleges and 
universities throughout the South and 
Southwest," said Faust. "It is the 
primary application form atMcNeese, 
USL, LSU, Louisiana Tech, South- 
eastern, and Nichols State." 

Students who prefer the Appli- 
cation for Federal Student Aid are 
encouraged to continue to use this 
form, especially if they only desire a 
Pell Grant. 

"However," said Faust, "we 
encourage students applying for Pell 
Grants, student loans, and College 
Work Study to use the ACT Family 
Financial Statement because of its 
many advantages to our students and 
to NSU." 

There are various h; nd-outs 
available in the Financial Aid office 
explaining both forms. 

Students needing assistance in 
completing either of these forms are 
encouraged to stop by the Financial 
Aid office located in Roy Hall, Room 
109 from 8 a.m to 4:30 p.m. Monday 
through Friday. 



Northwestern Flight Team needs funds to fly 



NATCHITOCHES— North- 
western State University's intercolle- 
giate flight team has launched a fund- 
raising project to support its participa- 
tion in the National Intercollegiate 
Flying Association's National Safety 
and Flight Evaluation Conference to 
be conducted in May in North Dakota. 

The Northwestern Flight Team 
has qualified for the second time in 
the past four years to compete in the 
National SAFECON. Northwestern 
earned the right to compete for na- 
tional honors by finishing fourth 
overall at the NTFA's Region IV 
SAFECON competition last fall at 
Southwest Texas Junior College in 
Uvalde, Tex. 

Northwestem's first trip to the 
National SAFECON was in April of 



1986. That year, NSU's Mike Turk of 
Lewisville, Ark., who was a junior 
aviation science major, won top indi- 
vidual pilot honor to lead the North- 
western Flight Team to a fourth-place 
overalll finish at the national champi- 
onships. 

The Northwestern Flight Team 
is sponsored by the Division of Avia- 
tion Science in the department of 
Industrial Technology. It is solely 
supported by contributions and mo- 
nies raise by flight team members. 

"It is these cash donations and 
other contributions that make it pos- 
sible for Northwestem's flight team 
to compete in regional and national 
competitions," stated Larry Varnado, 
coordinator of the Division of Avia- 
tion Science at Northwestern. 



He added, "We estimate our 
expenses to attend the National 
SAFECON will be some $5,000. The 
Northwestern Flight Team will do its 
best to honorably represent Louisiana 
aviation in the upcoming NTFA na- 
tional championships." 

Anyone wishing to make a 
donation to support the Northwestern 
Flight Team's participation in May at 
the NIFA's National SAFECON 
competition should make their check 
payable to the NSU Foundation-NSU 
Flight Team Account and mail it to 
the Office of External Affairs, Alumni 
Center, Northwestern State Univer- 
sity, Natchitoches, La. 71497. 

For further information, contact 
Larry Varnado, coordinator of the 




Division of Aviation ScienceatNSU, 
(318) 357-5102; the NSU Right 
Operations Office at 357-3209, or the 
Office of External Affairs at 357-44 14. 

Members of the Northwestern 
Flight Team are Doug Sellars of 
Morgan City; Robert Dallas Jones of 
Natchitoches; Scott Waskom of 
Natchitoches, who received a medal 
forplacing first in the power-off land- 
ings event at the Region IV meet; 
Toby Brazzel of Melrose; Scott 
Bergeron of Tioga, a double medals 
regional winner who placed second in 
message drop and fourth in visual 
flight rules navigation; Bill Finton of 
Coushatta; FJ. Delphin of Natchez, 
and flight team coach and advisor Bill 
Finton of Coushatta. 

NSU Flight Team members 
present a plaque to Waymon 
Shields (third from left), an 
employee of SkyQuest Inc., 
for his assistance in raising 
funds which helped send the 
NSU Flight Team to the 1988 
Region IV Safety and Flight 
Evaluation Conference 
(SAFECON) conducted last 
fall in Uvalde, Texas. The 
NSU Flight Team has quali- 
fied to compete in the National 
Intercollegiate Flying 
Association's national Cham- 
pionships in May in North 
Dakota. Members, from left, 
are Scott Bergeron of Tioga, 
Doug Sellers of Morgan City, 
team advisor and coach David 
Perry, Robert Jones and Scott 
Waskom, both of Natchito- 
ches. 



PAGE 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



JANUARY 17, 1989 



NEWS 



EDI 



Swaine, 

Brant to 
appear at 

pageant 

NORTHWESTERN-The 1989 
Lady of the Bracelet Pageant, to be 
held on Friday, January 27, will fea- 
ture two celebrities from Louisiana. 

Liz Swaine, an anchorperson 
from KTBS-TV Channel 3 in Shre- 
veport, will be the Mistress of Cere- 
monies for the pageant, which will be 
celebrating its thirtieth anniversary 
with the theme "30 Years of Puttrn* on 
the Ritz." Along with Al Pierce, Ms. 
Swaine is theanchor of the 5, 6, and 10 
o'clock broadcasts, which recently 
were rated number one in the Shre- 
veport area. 

Appearing with Ms. Swaine will 
be Patricia Brant, Miss Louisiana 
1987. While holding that title, Miss 
Brant was named First Runner-Up 
and Preliminary Talent Winner at the 
1987 Miss America Pageant, finish- 
ing higher than any other Miss Louisi- 
ana in the pageant's history. At the 
LOB pageant, she will perform her 
award-winning ventriloquism act, 
which she has been doing for 1 5 years 
in places like Las Vegas and other 
national conventions. 




Liz Swaine 



Patricia Brant 



Spring intramurals events scheduled 



DIVISION OF LEISURE 
ACTIVITIES— Shoot, holler and 
follow will be the theme of the first 
Intramural sports competition of 1 989. 
This year's basketball season prom- 
ises to be more exciting than ever with 
the addition of a three point line. Team 
Basketball, the first major money sport 
of the spring, begins on Monday, Jan. 
23, at 5 p.m. There will be a manda- 
tory Team Captains meeting Wednes- 
day, Jan. 25 at 7 p.m. in room 1 14 of 
the Intramural/Recreation Building, a 
representative from each team must 
be present. The Jamboree will be held 
on Thursday, Jan. 26. 

Basketball special events begin 
at the charity strip. Prelims for the 
Foul Shooting and Hot Shot Contest 
begin on Thursday, Jan. 26 and con- 
tinue through Wednesday, Feb. 15. 
Participants may shoot anytime 
Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. 
to 9 p.m. and on Fridays from 8 a.m. to 
5 p.m. Participants will have the op- 
portunity to better their score with 
additional attempts, each additional 
attempt is 250, participants may try as 
many times as times as they wish. The 
top 10% will qualify for the semi 
finals on Wednesday the 15th for the 
Hot Shot Contest and Thursday the 
16th for the Foul Shooting Contest. 
The top three participants will ad- 
vance to the finals to be held at half time 
of Demon Basketball games. The first 
place winner will receive $25 and the 
second place winner will receive $15. 

Basketball- Entry deadline for 
all teams is for this money sport is 
Monday, Jan. 23. Round Robin league 
play with a single elimination play off 
will be scheduled. The top two teams 
in each league consist of 5 players. 
Games will be played from Monday 
through Thursday in the Intramural 
and P.E. Majors Gym from 5 p.m. to 
9 p.m. There will be three leagues for 
men and women, Greek, Dormitory 
and Open. A mandatory team captains 
meeting will be held Wednesday, Jan. 
25 at 7 p.m. in room 114 of the Intra- 
mural/Recreation Building. A repre- 
sentative from each team must attend 
or the team will not be scheduled for 



New system speaks 



competition (a person may only rep- 
resent one team). Basketball Jambo- 
ree is scheduled for Thursday, Jan. 26, 
any team that would like to participate 
in the Jamboree should inform the 
Intramural Office when they turn in 
their entry card. A forfeiture fee of 
$10 per team will be charged; if the 
team does not forfeit any games the 
$10 fee will be refunded at seasons 
end. Teams must request a refund 
before the end of the semester. 

Team Racquetball- Entry dead- 
line for all teams in this money sport 
is Monday, March 6. All students, 
faculty and staff are eligible to partici- 
pate. There will be Greek, Dormitory 
and Open leagues for both men and 
women. A team shall consist of 4 
participants, a number 1 singles, a 
number 2 singles, and a doubles team. 
Team Racquetball will be held at 
Ackel's Warehouse Tuesday, March 
7, and Wednesday, March 8. Times to 
be arranged. 

Track Meet- Entry deadline for 
all teams in this money sport is Mon- 
day, March 20. All students, faculty 
and staff are eligible to participate. 
There will be Greed, Dormitory and 
Open leagues for both men and 
women. A team shall consist of a 
minimum of six participants. Partici- 
pants are limited to 3 running events 
or 3 field events in any combination 
up to 4 events. Intramural Track events 
included: 60 meter dash, 60 meter low 
hurdles, 100 meter dash, 400 meter 
dash, 400 meter relay, 800 meter run, 
200 meter dash, 1600 meter relay, 
long jump, high jump and shot put. 
The track meet will be held Wednes- 
day, March 22, at the Northwestern 
Track Complex, at 3:30 p.m. 

Softball-Entry deadline for all 
teams in this money sport is Friday, 
March 24. Round Robin league play 
with a single elimination play off will 
be scheduled. The two top teams in 
each league will play off to determine 
the league championship. Ateam shall 
consist of 10 players. Games will be 
Monday through Thursday on the 
ROTC and Intramural Fields. There 



will be three leagues for men and 
women, Greek, Dormitory and Open. 
A mandatory team captains meeting 
will be held Wednesday, March 29, at 
7 p.m. in room 1 14 of the Intramural/ 
Recreation Building. A representa- 
tive from each team must attend or the 
team will not be scheduled for compe- 
tition ( a person may only represent 
one team). Softball Jamboree is sched- 
uled for the Jamboree should inform 
the Intramural Office when they turn 
in their entry card. A forfeiture fee of 
$ 1 0.00 per team will be charged; if the 
team does not forfeit any games the 
$ 1 0.00 fee will be refunded at seasons 
end. Teams must request a refund 
before the end of the semester. 

Team Golf- Entry deadline for 
this money sport is Monday, April 24. 
All students, faculty and staff are eli- 
gible to participate. There will be 
Greek, Dormitory and Open leagues 
for both men and women. Teams may 
consist of up to 4 members. Team 
Golf will be held at the Northwestern 
Recreation Complex Tuesday, April 
25 , and Wednesday, April 26. Time to 
be arranged. 

The winners of Racquetball, 
Golf and Softball will have the oppor- 
tunity to represent Northwestern in 
the Spring State Intramural Tourna- 
ment to be held in Shreveport April 
28-30. 

Leisure Activities special events 
are designed to meet the broad needs 
of all students. Activities are recrea-' 
tional in nature and intended to be 
more flexible in structure and rules 
than our competitive based programs. 

The programs are scheduled as 
follows: Foul Shooting, January 26, 
Prelims begin; Basketball Jamboree, 
January 26; Hot Shot, January 26, 
Prelims begin; Slam Dunk, February 
1 ; Basketball Challenge, February 13; 
Olympics of the Mind, February 20; 
1 -on- 1 Basketball, February 22; 3-on- 
3 Basketball, February 27; 3 Man Golf 
Scramble, March 20; Superstar Com- 
petition, March 28; Softball Jambo- 
ree, March 30; Co-Rec Softball, April 
3, and Softball Challenge, April 10. 



Dormitories receive alarming new addition 



By MICHELLE WEEGO 
Managing Editor 

During the semester break, a 
new alarm system was installed in all 
dormitories on Northwestern 's cam- 
pus. The $26,000 Motorola system 
contains two independent systems 
which trigger a sound alarm and a 
radio transmitted voice when an alarm- 
activated door has been opened. 

"Every dorm has a different 



system," Paula Burke, Varnado head 
resident said. "When someone breaks 
into an activated door, the sound alarm 
will trigger, but also, a computer acti- 
vated voice will be transmitted imme- 
diately to the campus security. The 
voice will give the door and building 
number of the break-in." 

"This alarm system will allow 
us to know of a break-in within five 
seconds," said campus police chief 
Ricky Williams. 



"It seems to be working very 
well so far," Burke said. "It will pro- 
mote a more secure and safer cam- 
pus." 

The change in alarm systems 
has also meant a change in radio fre- 
quencies for campus security. Previ- 
ously, the campus police used the same 
radio frequency as the Natchitoches 
Police Department. 



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By BRAE 
Staff Writ 
Pu 

govemmei 
of the few 
Ta 

"Northwes 
University 
Nc 

to and fron 
state on bu 
To 

sign shouk 
I'd 

complained 
probably n 
Bu 

just like Nc 
to Northwe 
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to be, satis 
Northweste 



Lai 

By BRAD 

Staff Write 
HO, I 
all your Ch 
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Adv 



S 

Ad\ 




JANUARY 17, 1989 



CURRENT SAUCE 



PAGE 3 




EDITORIAL 



1-49 road sign needs change 

By BRAD BODENHEIMER 

Staff Writer 

Public relations — one of the most important aspects of any business entity, be it a corporation, state 
government, or even a university. Most everyone, I'm sure, will agree that good P.R. can be, and oftentimes is, one 
of the few things that can make or break one of these entities. 

Take, for instance, the sign on Interstate 49 identifying the exit for Northwestern. Instead of reading 
"Northwestern State University," it simply reads "NSU." Other schools' signs read "Northeast Louisiana 
University," "Louisiana Tech University" and "Southeastern Louisiana University." 

Now, I'm sure most of you are aware that 1-49 was just recently opened to traffic. Many of us use it to travel 
to and from home and school, but many other people not associated with the university use it while traversing the 
state on business, pleasure or whatever. 

To those people not from around this area, NSU could very well stand for "Nicholls State University." The 
sign should spell out Northwestern's fill name, if not for public relations, then just for plain pride. 

I'd like to think this is not Northwestern's fault I realize mat both Natchitoches and Northwestern 
complained when the interstate was first opened that there was no sign at all for the Natchitoches exit. The state was 
probably rushed to get the sign up as soon as possible, so that no more unwary motorists would miss the exit. 

But after all this time, we need a new sign. Northwestern should take the initiative in requesting the sign 
just like Northeast's and Tech's. This is a time to be a stickler for details, just when public relations are so important 
to Northwestern. 

Sure, the sign we have now serves its purpose. But I don't believe the university wants to be, or can afford 
to be, satisfied with mere function. Perhaps this, one of the smallest little details, will serve as a spark for 
Northwestern to begin paying attention to more of the little things, and not so little things, that the public notices. 



Late Christmas presents a surprise 

By BRAD BODENHEIMER 
Staff Writer 

HO, HO, HO! Merry Christmas! ! What? Is it a tittle late for that, you think? Thought you'd already received 
all your Christmas presents, huh?! 

Well, for those of us who live in the dorms here, particularly Rapides, the university decided to surprise us with 
a Utile present when we returned from the semester break, yes, tiny tittle things, little improvements, which we all 
noticed. No, nothing big, not very important things, but improvements nonetheless just to make things right. 

First of all, and I guess most importantly, we have hot water in the showers! Yes, new shower units were 
installed in some places, along with burned out lights being replaced and our doors being painted. Little things. And 
just to add a touch of class, we got those little pink air fresheners placed in the urinals. (Sorry, ladies, but this is more 
important than you think!) 

Ahhh, but you don't live on campus, you say! Not to worry, you weren't left out. Have you noticed, yet, that 
while driving on campus none of your tires have been absorbed by a pothole? Don't worry anymore about loose 
fenders because all those potholes were filled in. Surprised? Me, too! 

Someof youmightthinkthatnoneof this isabig deal, and individuallylguessthey'renoLButyoumustrealize 
what this represents. Justby fixing the little things, the university is showing that the students are beginning to come 
first again, how long that lasts still remains to be seen. 

So I'd like to commend, for whatever it's worth, all those responsible for these actions, including all the 
workers who actually made it happen. Of course I realize that these little tasks just might be done every year at this 
time, but this is the first time I've noticed it I, for one, am glad, though, that someone is starting to remember that 
we are not here for the university; rather, the university is here for us. 



Fearless Reporter Finds Incriminating Evidence in 
Bookstore Trash: Mouse Expected to Win Pulitzer 



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— , , — ; — • 

Current Sauce Meeting 
Today at 5 p.m. 
Rm. 225 Kyser Hall 



SGA President questions writer 

Dear Editor, 

I am writing in response to the editorial written by Mr. Brad Bodenheimer, strangely titled Local festival 
positive aspect of Natchitoches, in which Mr. Bodenheimer so kindly points out that the SGA has been in violation 
of Article 10, Section 2 of the Student Government Constitution which states that the minutes of each meeting should 
be published in the Current Sauce. 

I would personally like to thank Mr. Bodenheimer for being such a great watchdog for the students rights, and 
for being such a great constitutional scholar. I would also like to point out to Mr. Bodenheimer that the complete 
sentence in the SGA Constitution which he is so fond of quoting reads, "A representative from the Current Sauce 
shall attend all Student Senate meetings, and the minutes of each meeting shall be printed in the Current Sauce." 

I'm sure Mr. Bodenheimer was brimming with enthusiasm to write an article about the SGa and its failure to 
follow the Constitution. But why did Mr. Bodenheimer fail to mention the Current Sauce's failure to follow that 
same Constitution? 

The point of this letter is not to justify the SGA's noncompliance. I freely admit we screwed up. But the point 
I'm trying to make here is that people who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones. 

I'm also not trying to pick a fight with the Current Sauce. I very strongly believe that if the SGA and Current 
Sauce work together there is no limit to the good things we can do for Northwestern. Let's bury the hatchet and work 
together, shall we? 

Sincerely, 
Michael McHale, 

President 




URRENT QUOTES 



Vhat is your New Year's Resolution ? 





Erskine Cook, Jr. 
English 

Senior, Alexandria 

"To devote a lot 
more time to my academic 
studies and pull my GPA 
up." 



Laura Ainsworth Craig 
Pre-Pharmacy 
Sophomore, Pine ville 

"To build a better re- 
lationship with my parents. " 






Chris Carter 
Physical Education 
Senior, Winnfield 

"My New Year's 
Resolution is to not make 
any more New Year's Reso- 
lutions." 



Reginald Williams 
Language Arts 
Sophomore, New Orleans 

'To study harder and 
be nice to all people regard- 
less of age, sex, religion," 



Marty Branham 
Aviation 

Freshman, Merryville 

"My New Year's 
Resolutions were to make 
better grades and become 
an active in Theta Chi." 




Judy Boyette 
English Education 
Sophomore, Dodson 

"My New Year's 
Resolutions were to improve 
my GPA and make lots of 
friends." 



Current Sauce 



Spring '89 




UJJ9 \ 



!-N EVANS 
ing Manager 



Circulation} 
Distribution 



SCOTT MILLS 
Advertising Assistant 



SONYA RIGAUD 

Editor 

MICHELLE WEEGO 
Managing Editor 

BRAD BODENHEIMER BETH BOWMAN 
SHANNON J. GREER LAURIE LeBLANC 
ELIZABETH McDAVID ANNE MILLER 
BILL SCHNEIDER CAROLINE WARD 
Staff Writers 

TIM JOHNSON RANDY JONES 
GLEN MOORMAN ROBERT ROUGEAU 
Photographers 



TOM WHITEHEAD 
Adviser 




News EMnri 



EVAN TAYLOR 
Cartoonist 



KAREN ENGEROf 
SGA Reporter 



CINDY ROSS 
Assistant to the Editor 




Tlie Current Sauce is published weekly during the fall and 
Spring semestersby the students of Northwesrern State University of 
toufctana. it k nor associated with any of the Unt'vsrsify's depart- 
ments and fe financed independent^. 

The Curtent Sauce Is based fn the Office of Student Pubfica- 
ftom located in Kyser HaR, The office of the editorial staff te 225H, 
telephone ©1 8)357-5456. The adviser's office fe 103 Kyser Hail, tele- 
phone 357-52 13, 

^^plhe moling address for the Current Sauce is P.O. Box &306, 
NSU, Natchitoches, fcA 7U97. 

AS coftespondence, including fetter* to the editor is wef- 
come. Materia! submitted for consideration must be mailed to the 
above address or brought to the office. 

■\ The deadline for all advertisement and copy is 3 p.m. each 
Friday, inclusion of any and aft material f$ left to the discretion of the 
editor. 

Utterstolheedltorsrxjuld be typed(doubie-spaced), signed 
and should include a telephone number where the writer can be 
reached. Ho anonymous tetters will be printed. 

CutrentSauce subscription rates ore Sf? per academic year 
(23 issues) or $6 per semester {14 Issues). The paper is entered as 
second-class mail at; Natchitoches. LA. The USPS number 1$ 140- 
660. 



PAGE 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



JANUARY 17, 1989 



NEWS 



Broadway hit to be performed at NSU 



NATCHITOCHES— Music 
Theatre Associates' national touring 
company will present the hit Broad- 
way musical The Mystery of Edwin 
Drood Thursday, February 2, at 7:30 
p.m. in the Fine Arts Auditorium of 
the A.A. Fredericks Creative and 
Performing Arts Center. 

The show, which was awarded 
"Best Musical" honors for 1985 by 
New York theatre critics, is appearing 
at Northwestern under the co-spon- 
sorship of the University's Cultural 
Events Series and the Student Activi- 
ties. 

General admission tickets are 
$8 for adults and $5 for non-NSU 
students. They will go on sale Mon- 
day, January 30, in the office of the 
Department of Music and Theatre Arts. 

Full-time students ofNorthwest- 
em and the Louisiana School for Math, 
Science and the Arts will be admitted 
to the performance without admission 
charge, but students must pick up free 
tickets with a valid student identifica- 
tion card at the NSU Theatre and 
Theatre Department office during the 
week of the performance. 

The Mystery of Edwin Drood is 
a lively, madcap murder mystery and 
the only musical in theatre history that 



lets the audience vote on the ending. 

Suggested by an unfinished 
Charles Dickens novel, this ingenious 
musical leaves it up to the audience to 
choose the murderer in a popularity — 
or non-popularity — contest. 

The professional actors in the 
musical's cast are prepared to per- 
form any and all of the possible solu- 
tions the audience might select, with 
the various endings already written by 
author Rupert Holmes. 

According to NSU Cultural 
Events Series chairman Tony Smith, 
who saw the musical in New York, 
there is a different ending at every 
performance because the audience 
picks up where Dickens left off. 

The Mystery of Edwin Drood is 
the first stage musical written by 
Holmes, who is best known as the 
composer of the hit tune "Escape (The 
Pina Colada Song)." 

His musical won five Tony 
Awards, including Best Musical. It 
also received the Drama Desk and 
Outer Critics Circle Awards for Best 
Musical, and was the first Broadway 
musical in history receive the rarely 
presented Edgar Award for Best Play 
from the Mystery Writers of America. 

The Mystery of Edwin Drood 



combines the twists and turns of a 
good whodunit with the high-spirited 
fun of an English Music Hal